100 same-sex couples get married in Mexico City mass wedding

6/27/2022 6:15:00 PM

Mexico City hosted a mass wedding ceremony for gay couples as part of celebrations for Pride Month.

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Mexico City hosted a mass wedding ceremony for gay couples as part of celebrations for Pride Month.

The capital of Mexico hosted a mass wedding ceremony for gay couples as part of celebrations for Pride Month.

There is an ever-present fear of being rejected or attacked in Guerrero, a state where same-sex relationships are not widely accepted and one of five in Mexico where same-sex marriage is still not allowed.Their ability to wed is considered one of the LGBT community’s greatest recent achievements in Mexico. It is now possible in 27 of Mexico’s 32 states and has been twice upheld by the Supreme Court.

Mexico, Brazil and Argentina top Latin America in the number of same-sex marriages.“I feel nervous,” said Villalobos, a 30-year-old computer science major, as Marcelo held her hand.Villalobos met Marcelo, a native of the beach town, there. Marcelo, a 29-year-old shop employee, said her acceptance of her sexual orientation was not as traumatic as Villalobos’, but she still did not come out as pansexual until she was 24. She said she had been aided by the Mexico City organization Cuenta Conmigo, — Count on Me — which provides educational and psychological support.

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? '')))' It's a LGBTQ unfriendly misclassification; the misconception from the 1960's regarding the theory of homosexuality's cause! It's a 'SLUR', an erroneous classifications towards homosexuals' or preference of same sex relationships or LGBTQ liking... Unfriendly LGBT issue! I hope they repent before the Lord returns. There's no air conditioning down there.

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After two-year hiatus, Mexico City conducts mass ceremony for same-sex couplesHundreds of Mexican same-sex couples married on Friday, marking the first time that the annual mass ceremony in Mexico City ahead of its Pride parade has taken place after being cancelled for two years due to the pandemic. 🤮🤮🤮 快格瓦拉了 🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮

Mass same-sex wedding in Mexico challenges discriminationTheir ability to wed is considered one of the LGBT community’s greatest recent achievements in Mexico. It is now possible in 27 of Mexico’s 32 states and has been twice upheld by the Supreme Court. 🤮 Sweet! 😍😍😍

By Associated Press Even after five years of living together in the Pacific resort city of Acapulco, something as simple as holding hands or sharing a kiss in public is unthinkable for Dayanny Marcelo and Mayela Villalobos.Save Story Save this story for later.ahead of Sunday's march.Uvalde, Tex.

There is an ever-present fear of being rejected or attacked in Guerrero, a state where same-sex relationships are not widely accepted and one of five in Mexico where same-sex marriage is still not allowed. But this week they traveled the 235 miles (380 kilometers) to Mexico’s capital, where the city government hosted a mass wedding for same-sex couples as part of celebrations of LGBT Pride Month. Demanding rights for (and decrying violence against) Mexico’s queer community, the event saw some 250,000 people take to the historic Paseo de la Reforma Avenue, according to the Government of Mexico City. Under a tent set up in the plaza of the capital’s civil registry, along with about 100 other same-sex couples, Villalobos and Marcelo sealed their union Friday with a kiss while the wedding march played in the background. There was also live music and two performance stages. Their ability to wed is considered one of the LGBT community’s greatest recent achievements in Mexico. Photographed by Pedro Lollet 1/17 El Ángel de la Independencia was the starting point for the march, which littered the most symbolic street in Mexico’s capital with rainbows. It is now possible in 27 of Mexico’s 32 states and has been twice upheld by the Supreme Court. They were “unable to locate any victims or witnesses,” Officer Kathryn Winters, a spokeswoman and LGBTQ liaison for the department, said in an email to The Washington Post.

Couples of the same sex attend a mass wedding ceremony organized by city authorities as part of the LGBTQ pride month celebrations, in Mexico City, Friday, June 24, 2022. The heat didn't stop more than 7,000 runners from hitting the pavement, running four miles through the park to celebrate Pride Weekend. Fernando Llano / AP Mexico, Brazil and Argentina top Latin America in the number of same-sex marriages. Mariaurora Mota, a leader of the Mexican LGBTTTI+ Coalition, said the movement still is working to guarantee in all of Mexico the right to change one’s identity, have access to health care and social security and to let transsexual minors change their gender on their birth certificates. Walking around Mexico City a day before their wedding, Marcelo and Villalobos confessed to feeling strange holding hands in the city streets. On Friday, in Tompkins Square Park and made its way to the Stonewall Inn. Displays of affection between same-sex couples in the capital are commonplace, but it was difficult to shed their inhibititions. Regardless, the San Francisco Police Department does not use tear gas to disperse crowds.

“I feel nervous,” said Villalobos, a 30-year-old computer science major, as Marcelo held her hand. Villalobos grew up in the northern state of Coahuila in a conservative Christian community. It was announced Saturday that Planned Parenthood will lead the parade. She always felt an “internal struggle,” because she knew she had a different sexual orientation, but feared her family would reject her. “I always cried because I wanted to be normal,” she said. She came out to her mother when she was 23.  To find a list of Pride-related street closures this weekend,.

She thought that moving to Acapulco in 2017 with a young niece would give her more freedom. Villalobos met Marcelo, a native of the beach town, there. Marcelo, a 29-year-old shop employee, said her acceptance of her sexual orientation was not as traumatic as Villalobos’, but she still did not come out as pansexual until she was 24. She said she had been aided by the Mexico City organization Cuenta Conmigo, — Count on Me — which provides educational and psychological support. Walking around the capital this week with massive rainbow flags hanging from public buildings and smaller ones flapping in front of many businesses, Villalobos could not help but compare it to her native state and her present home in Guerrero.

“In the same country the people are very open and in another (place) ... the people are close-minded, with messages of hate toward the community,” she said. A same-sex couple in the esplanade of the General Directorate of the Civil Registry of Mexico City, during a collective wedding in the framework of the International LGBTTTIQA Pride Day in recognition of the rights of diverse coexistence communities in Mexico.

Gerardo Vieyra / AP Elihú Rendón, a 28-year-old administrative employee for a ride-sharing application, and Javier Vega Candia, a 26-year-old theater teacher, grew up in Mexico City and coming out for them was not so complicated. “We’re in a city where they’re opening all of the rights and possibilities to us, including doing this communal LGBT wedding,” said Vega Candia as he held out Rendon’s hand to show off a ring he had given him shortly before they moved in together. When they walk through the city’s streets they don’t hesitate to express affection, sometimes hugging and dancing in a crosswalk while traffic was stopped. “I’m happy to have been born in this city thinking that we have these rights and not in another country where we could be killed,” Vega Candia said. Villalobos and Marcelo do not expect much in their daily lives to change when they return to Acapulco as a married couple.

But Marcelo said that with the marriage certificate, she will try to get Villalobos included on the health insurance she receives through her employer. “With a marriage certificate it is easier,” Marcelo said. “If something happens to me or something happens to her, we’ll have proof that we’re together.” Associated Press .