Why the witch-hunt victims of early modern Britain have come back to haunt us

10/24/2021 12:25:00 PM

Why the witch-hunt victims of early modern Britain have come back to haunt us

Scotland, Germany

Why the witch-hunt victims of early modern Britain have come back to haunt us

The women killed as witches centuries ago are starting to receive justice. But let’s not glamorise the murder of innocents

A contemporary engraving shows the burning of three alleged witches in Derenburg, Germany.of 28 Fashion insiders are already falling for Ssōne, the London label that specialises in socially-conscious, environmentally friendly statement pieces, each of which comes with facts about its provenance.It’s a dilemma: the same ill effects can be caused by too much or too little water A happy, healthy plant which has had exactly the right amount of watering.Biden just met a guy named Brandon and everyone said the same thing The romanticisation of Goldberg could arguably be down to fantasy – being attracted to someone problematic without consequence.

Photograph: Alamy A contemporary engraving shows the burning of three alleged witches in Derenburg, Germany. Photograph: Alamy Sun 24 Oct 2021 10. Silks are coloured with eco-reactive dye (less damaging than regular versions), and its packaging uses zero plastic.15 BST L ilias Addie’s body was piled into a wooden box and buried beneath a half-tonne sandstone slab on the foreshore where a dark North Sea laps the Fife coast.15 BST B eginners, I get it. More than a hundred years later, she was exhumed by opportunistic Victorian gravediggers and her bones – unusually large for a woman living in the early 18th century – were later put on show at the Empire exhibition in Glasgow. Join the club the sustainable way with All Blues, which handcrafts its designs in Stockholm from recycled sterling silver. Her simple coffin was carved into a wooden walking stick – engraved “Lilias Addie, 1704” – which ended up in the collection of Andrew Carnegie, then the richest man in the world.” Back in 2019, he took to Twitter to hit back at passionate, Joe-loving fans.

It was no sort of burial, but from the perspective of the thousands of women accused of, and executed for, witchcraft in early modern Britain, Lilias’s fate had a degree of dignity. 13 of 28 All of Rave Review's big personality patchwork coats – a firm street-styler favourite – are made using upcycled garments, resolutely proving that second-hand doesn't mean second-best. Yet perhaps the biggest paradox of them all is when it comes to wilting leaves, which can rather unhelpfully be a sign either of overwatering or of underwatering, making dealing with them a perplexing problem. “Most women were burned, rather than buried, their identities erased by authorities and families out of fear and shame,” says Claire Mitchell QC, who is campaigning for a legal pardon for, and monument to, the estimated 2,558 Scots who were executed in the brutal centuries of femicide after Scotland’s 1563 Witchcraft Act (the same year England enacted its own bloody statute). She adds: “This lack of historical record makes it harder as a society to have the reckoning with history that we dearly need to have. Collections are designed with a small carbon footprint in mind.” If it’s a case of cultural amnesia, it’s hiding in plain sight. Plants are made up largely of water. Halloween 2021 and online fast-fashion retailers are jolly with “witchy inspo”: cross-fusions of witch costumes and bunny girl outfits; miniature pointed hats worn at a jaunty angle, with a lipglossed pout. 15 of 28 The Duchess of Sussex is a fan - and you will be too once you hear the roll call of Veja's sustainable and ethical credentials.” “For some women, they see a person that is broken, and that failed to be loved at some point in their lives and can deeply empathise with him,” she said.

Meanwhile, designer Viktor & Rolf riffs on “wicked witches” in its haute couture shows (raven-winged leathers and laser eyes); trends on social media (an interior and lifestyle aesthetic centred on dark interiors, gemstones and, oddly, bread-baking); and influencers including the Modern Witch peddle a novel iteration of magical capitalism (spell-casting for business curse-removal, anyone?). Digital reconstruction of the face of Lilias Addie. It has also purchased 195 tons of wild rubber, to preserve 120,000 hectares of the Amazon rainforest, since 2004. This is the classic wilted appearance we all associate with drought stress. Photograph: Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, University of Dundee/BBC Radio Scotland/PA Our cultural reappraisal of the European witch-hunts began in the 1960s, when second wave feminists reinterpreted these pogroms as patriarchy’s “original sin”: brutal, three-century campaigns that destroyed ancient female practices and means of income, from traditional midwifery to the ale business (once dominated by ale women, who wore pointed hats to signify their trade and kept cats to chase rodents away). For Marxist theorist Silvia Federici, author of the seminal Caliban and the Witch , the witch-hunts were the last volley in the defeat of artisan peasants and the rise of capitalist wage labour. Its RefScale tracks its environmental footprint - adding up the pounds of carbon dioxide emitted, gallons of water used and pounds of waste generated - so that the company can then offset those resources. Here was women’s “great historic defeat”, on whose burning stakes the bourgeois ideals of dependent, domestic womanhood were forged. Yet these roots need a mixture of both water and air in the soil to keep healthy. It doesn’t stop there.

Hartmut Hegeler, an activist German pastor, wants his nation to come to terms with the estimated 25,000 women murdered in its particularly bloody 1500-1782 witch persecution. 17 of 28 This New Zealand sneaker brand's mantra - 'Light on your feet, easy on the planet,' - tells you all you need to know. Hegeler feels that pop culture’s fascination with witchiness – seen in the resurgent popularity in central and northern Europe of the spring Walpurgis night festival , where witches are ceremonially burned at the stake – is not a route to restoring murdered women’s dignity. “These convicted people could not have committed the crimes they are accused of,” Hegeler says, “flying on a broom for bedevilment, causing harm by magic to weather and fornicating with the devil. It also takes its carbon footprint seriously - good news for a shoe label - and is a 100% carbon-neutral business. This damage paradoxically hampers the plant’s ability to absorb water, leading it to display the symptoms of drought stress. We must recognise injustice in the past, otherwise we will not recognise injustice today.” He has called on European countries to pardon women executed for witchcraft, out of superstition, suppression, brute thievery and spite, and to erect memorials to them, as Cologne and Leipzig have done. It has a vegetarian lunch scheme for staff, with produce sourced from local producers via Farmdrop, the office itself runs on green energy and it even uses toilet paper from Who Gives A Crap, a charity who donates 50% of its profits to improving sanitation in the developing world. According to , “certain acts, even though they may be violent or harmful to someone else, can be seen as acceptable if it can be somehow justified.

Mitchell and her co-campaigner Zoe Venditozzi want also to see a shift away from witches’ spiritual exceptionalism – dark arts, herby hubble-bubble and magical seer-ing – to a more historically accurate reframing of those persecuted as witches. Most houseplant deaths, judging by the sorry specimens people show me, are from overwatering, usually the result of this confusing catch-22. “These were mostly just women who were leading their lives,” says Venditozzi, a secondary school teacher in north-east Fife, “and for whatever reason they got accused of witchcraft… They could have been you or I. All its fabrications also meet the Oeko-Tex Standard 100, the highest certifiable standard for ensuring responsible use of chemicals during the fabric construction.” Lilias was accused of casting curses on children, according to a preserved cache of Scottish court documents, by a woman named Jean Bizet, who owed money to the accused. Lilias’s unusual physical features – her preternaturally long limbs and pronounced overbite – possibly sealed her fate. Its organic cotton jersey was developed and is made in Melbourne with 95% certified-organic fibres, which biodegrade and are produced without pesticides, it donates past season samples to a company that turns them into cleaning rags and its paper and cardboard packaging is 100% recyclable and biodegradable. There are two ways to spot whether a plant needs a drink. Her watery burial beneath a stone, the documents reveal, was designed to stop her body being “revenired”, or returned to life from the dead, by the devil. For fans who have already bolted through season three of the hit Netflix series, you’ll see Badgley back on screens after the streaming platform announced a renewal for season four.

She wasn’t burned at the stake, as she died in prison. They're made out of Italian Econyl, a 100% regenerated nylon fibre created from fishing nets and other types of nylon waste, which is woven in Lombardy, Italy. Popular history also elides the executed who were men: 15% of the Scots victims and 10% of the estimated 800 who perished by drowning or at the stake between 1603 and 1735 in England’s witch trials, Mitchell notes. If you need further confirmation, pick up the plant to feel its weight. Venditozzi cites an erected memorial to the dead of the witch hunts of Orkney that sums up the everywoman- (and indeed everyman-) ness of the victims. Each pair of zero-waste E. It reads, simply: “They wur cheust folk” (they were just folk). “That’s how we should properly think of these people,” she says.V jeans, however, is made from two pairs of discarded jeans that would otherwise end up in landfill and are produced in a five-mile radius between Dalston and Walthamstow.

“As just folk like you and me.” Walpurgis night celebrations in Erfurt, central Germany. That 'something old' is previously worn Levi's jeans that are hand-picked and hand-cut in limited quantities. Photograph: Jens Meyer/AP Across the world, a campaign for a cultural reckoning, for a candid look at those children’s book characters and campy costumes, for monuments and due apologies, gathers pace. In Catalonia, 150 history professors are signatories to a petition No . 24 of 28 Everlane, the San Francisco-based start-up that proves sustainable clothes don't have to cost the earth, has a simple mission statement: 'radial transparency'.

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Not going to lie, I thought this article was going to be a lot more spooky and far less ‘woke’ which one of y’all in sandals wrote this? One of my distant relatives on my mother's side Jane Wenham was convicted of being a witch because she was an elderly woman who begged for some straw... Many people accused of being witches were poor and cost the parish money to support. Jane Wenham was 70 and lived alone.

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A contemporary engraving shows the burning of three alleged witches in Derenburg, Germany.of 28 Fashion insiders are already falling for Ssōne, the London label that specialises in socially-conscious, environmentally friendly statement pieces, each of which comes with facts about its provenance.It’s a dilemma: the same ill effects can be caused by too much or too little water A happy, healthy plant which has had exactly the right amount of watering.Biden just met a guy named Brandon and everyone said the same thing The romanticisation of Goldberg could arguably be down to fantasy – being attracted to someone problematic without consequence.

Photograph: Alamy A contemporary engraving shows the burning of three alleged witches in Derenburg, Germany. Photograph: Alamy Sun 24 Oct 2021 10. Silks are coloured with eco-reactive dye (less damaging than regular versions), and its packaging uses zero plastic.15 BST L ilias Addie’s body was piled into a wooden box and buried beneath a half-tonne sandstone slab on the foreshore where a dark North Sea laps the Fife coast.15 BST B eginners, I get it. More than a hundred years later, she was exhumed by opportunistic Victorian gravediggers and her bones – unusually large for a woman living in the early 18th century – were later put on show at the Empire exhibition in Glasgow. Join the club the sustainable way with All Blues, which handcrafts its designs in Stockholm from recycled sterling silver. Her simple coffin was carved into a wooden walking stick – engraved “Lilias Addie, 1704” – which ended up in the collection of Andrew Carnegie, then the richest man in the world.” Back in 2019, he took to Twitter to hit back at passionate, Joe-loving fans.

It was no sort of burial, but from the perspective of the thousands of women accused of, and executed for, witchcraft in early modern Britain, Lilias’s fate had a degree of dignity. 13 of 28 All of Rave Review's big personality patchwork coats – a firm street-styler favourite – are made using upcycled garments, resolutely proving that second-hand doesn't mean second-best. Yet perhaps the biggest paradox of them all is when it comes to wilting leaves, which can rather unhelpfully be a sign either of overwatering or of underwatering, making dealing with them a perplexing problem. “Most women were burned, rather than buried, their identities erased by authorities and families out of fear and shame,” says Claire Mitchell QC, who is campaigning for a legal pardon for, and monument to, the estimated 2,558 Scots who were executed in the brutal centuries of femicide after Scotland’s 1563 Witchcraft Act (the same year England enacted its own bloody statute). She adds: “This lack of historical record makes it harder as a society to have the reckoning with history that we dearly need to have. Collections are designed with a small carbon footprint in mind.” If it’s a case of cultural amnesia, it’s hiding in plain sight. Plants are made up largely of water. Halloween 2021 and online fast-fashion retailers are jolly with “witchy inspo”: cross-fusions of witch costumes and bunny girl outfits; miniature pointed hats worn at a jaunty angle, with a lipglossed pout. 15 of 28 The Duchess of Sussex is a fan - and you will be too once you hear the roll call of Veja's sustainable and ethical credentials.” “For some women, they see a person that is broken, and that failed to be loved at some point in their lives and can deeply empathise with him,” she said.

Meanwhile, designer Viktor & Rolf riffs on “wicked witches” in its haute couture shows (raven-winged leathers and laser eyes); trends on social media (an interior and lifestyle aesthetic centred on dark interiors, gemstones and, oddly, bread-baking); and influencers including the Modern Witch peddle a novel iteration of magical capitalism (spell-casting for business curse-removal, anyone?). Digital reconstruction of the face of Lilias Addie. It has also purchased 195 tons of wild rubber, to preserve 120,000 hectares of the Amazon rainforest, since 2004. This is the classic wilted appearance we all associate with drought stress. Photograph: Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, University of Dundee/BBC Radio Scotland/PA Our cultural reappraisal of the European witch-hunts began in the 1960s, when second wave feminists reinterpreted these pogroms as patriarchy’s “original sin”: brutal, three-century campaigns that destroyed ancient female practices and means of income, from traditional midwifery to the ale business (once dominated by ale women, who wore pointed hats to signify their trade and kept cats to chase rodents away). For Marxist theorist Silvia Federici, author of the seminal Caliban and the Witch , the witch-hunts were the last volley in the defeat of artisan peasants and the rise of capitalist wage labour. Its RefScale tracks its environmental footprint - adding up the pounds of carbon dioxide emitted, gallons of water used and pounds of waste generated - so that the company can then offset those resources. Here was women’s “great historic defeat”, on whose burning stakes the bourgeois ideals of dependent, domestic womanhood were forged. Yet these roots need a mixture of both water and air in the soil to keep healthy. It doesn’t stop there.

Hartmut Hegeler, an activist German pastor, wants his nation to come to terms with the estimated 25,000 women murdered in its particularly bloody 1500-1782 witch persecution. 17 of 28 This New Zealand sneaker brand's mantra - 'Light on your feet, easy on the planet,' - tells you all you need to know. Hegeler feels that pop culture’s fascination with witchiness – seen in the resurgent popularity in central and northern Europe of the spring Walpurgis night festival , where witches are ceremonially burned at the stake – is not a route to restoring murdered women’s dignity. “These convicted people could not have committed the crimes they are accused of,” Hegeler says, “flying on a broom for bedevilment, causing harm by magic to weather and fornicating with the devil. It also takes its carbon footprint seriously - good news for a shoe label - and is a 100% carbon-neutral business. This damage paradoxically hampers the plant’s ability to absorb water, leading it to display the symptoms of drought stress. We must recognise injustice in the past, otherwise we will not recognise injustice today.” He has called on European countries to pardon women executed for witchcraft, out of superstition, suppression, brute thievery and spite, and to erect memorials to them, as Cologne and Leipzig have done. It has a vegetarian lunch scheme for staff, with produce sourced from local producers via Farmdrop, the office itself runs on green energy and it even uses toilet paper from Who Gives A Crap, a charity who donates 50% of its profits to improving sanitation in the developing world. According to , “certain acts, even though they may be violent or harmful to someone else, can be seen as acceptable if it can be somehow justified.

Mitchell and her co-campaigner Zoe Venditozzi want also to see a shift away from witches’ spiritual exceptionalism – dark arts, herby hubble-bubble and magical seer-ing – to a more historically accurate reframing of those persecuted as witches. Most houseplant deaths, judging by the sorry specimens people show me, are from overwatering, usually the result of this confusing catch-22. “These were mostly just women who were leading their lives,” says Venditozzi, a secondary school teacher in north-east Fife, “and for whatever reason they got accused of witchcraft… They could have been you or I. All its fabrications also meet the Oeko-Tex Standard 100, the highest certifiable standard for ensuring responsible use of chemicals during the fabric construction.” Lilias was accused of casting curses on children, according to a preserved cache of Scottish court documents, by a woman named Jean Bizet, who owed money to the accused. Lilias’s unusual physical features – her preternaturally long limbs and pronounced overbite – possibly sealed her fate. Its organic cotton jersey was developed and is made in Melbourne with 95% certified-organic fibres, which biodegrade and are produced without pesticides, it donates past season samples to a company that turns them into cleaning rags and its paper and cardboard packaging is 100% recyclable and biodegradable. There are two ways to spot whether a plant needs a drink. Her watery burial beneath a stone, the documents reveal, was designed to stop her body being “revenired”, or returned to life from the dead, by the devil. For fans who have already bolted through season three of the hit Netflix series, you’ll see Badgley back on screens after the streaming platform announced a renewal for season four.

She wasn’t burned at the stake, as she died in prison. They're made out of Italian Econyl, a 100% regenerated nylon fibre created from fishing nets and other types of nylon waste, which is woven in Lombardy, Italy. Popular history also elides the executed who were men: 15% of the Scots victims and 10% of the estimated 800 who perished by drowning or at the stake between 1603 and 1735 in England’s witch trials, Mitchell notes. If you need further confirmation, pick up the plant to feel its weight. Venditozzi cites an erected memorial to the dead of the witch hunts of Orkney that sums up the everywoman- (and indeed everyman-) ness of the victims. Each pair of zero-waste E. It reads, simply: “They wur cheust folk” (they were just folk). “That’s how we should properly think of these people,” she says.V jeans, however, is made from two pairs of discarded jeans that would otherwise end up in landfill and are produced in a five-mile radius between Dalston and Walthamstow.

“As just folk like you and me.” Walpurgis night celebrations in Erfurt, central Germany. That 'something old' is previously worn Levi's jeans that are hand-picked and hand-cut in limited quantities. Photograph: Jens Meyer/AP Across the world, a campaign for a cultural reckoning, for a candid look at those children’s book characters and campy costumes, for monuments and due apologies, gathers pace. In Catalonia, 150 history professors are signatories to a petition No . 24 of 28 Everlane, the San Francisco-based start-up that proves sustainable clothes don't have to cost the earth, has a simple mission statement: 'radial transparency'.