‘There was a lot of magnolia’: a couple’s revamped flat shows renting needn’t mean bad design

1/29/2022 12:51:00 PM

‘There was a lot of magnolia’: a couple’s revamped flat shows renting needn’t mean bad design

Homes, Art

‘There was a lot of magnolia’: a couple’s revamped flat shows renting needn’t mean bad design

A pair of vintage furniture dealers have transformed their flat with paint, fixtures and art – all with their landlady’s approval

Sat 29 Jan 2022 08., only for her to gently reply that she loved him as a friend.The couple were tired of spending £1,000 a month on rent alone (Picture: Mercury Press) Fed up of renting while their friends jumped on the property ladder, couple Joe Carter and Ruby Gove, both 28, decided to do something a bit different.Kym Marsh will continue to co-host with Gethin, and Kimberley Walsh and Sara Cox are also set to become permanent members of the team.

00 GMT P eriod features were conspicuously absent from Becky Nolan and Barny Read’s flat-hunting wishlist. The couple, who run the Peanut Vendor , a 20th-century design store in east London, were living in a Victorian flat but decided a more modern space would better showcase their collections of abstract art and esoteric furniture. She posed as an au pair for a woman named Miranda Priestley (Victoria Ekanoye) – no, not the ruthless magazine editor from The Devil Wears Prada , but a murderous drug trafficker. “We were ready for a change from bay windows and wonky walls; we wanted to try an art gallery-style white box,” Read says. ‘We didn’t want to stop seeing people and going places but it’s so difficult to have a life at the same time as saving. They found a two-bedroom flat built in the 1990s to rent and were hooked by its two small terraces, front and back. Ultimately, the events that followed led to the detective leaving the island for the second time. The flat itself was uninspiring. BBC’s Head of Daytime & Early Peak Carla-Maria Lawson said of the move: “Telling stories that authentically reflect the concerns and interests of viewers from across the whole of the UK has played a huge part in the incredible success of Morning Live and the move to our new home in Manchester will give us scope to give voice to an even wider range of communities.

“It was nondescript and a bit tired, with lots of magnolia,” Nolan recalls. Originally based in Jamaica, Florence joined Miranda and her family on a trip back to Saint Marie, but their stay at a farm led to the death of owner Harley Joseph (Ben Onwukwe). To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video The makeover took a lot of time, money (£8,000 just on the renovations, to be exact), and effort, but it’s oh so worth it – especially because the couple now save over £730 a month on bills and rent. But a quick peep under the beige carpets revealed a concrete screed floor: “We thought that had potential,” Read says. Becky and Barny: ‘We had big ideas about being minimalist, having a lot of empty white space. Neville and Commissioner Selwyn Patterson (Don Warrington) were quick to prioritise Florence's safety, while the woman herself delved further into the case and discovered just how dangerous Miranda really was.’ Photograph: Rachael Smith With their landlady’s approval, they painted the walls brilliant white, resin-coated the concrete floor and removed and stored the existing fittings, “so we can reinstate them when we leave”. The van cost just £5k (Picture: Mercury Press & Media Ltd) ‘It was such a new process for the both of us – we had no idea what we were doing. They swapped faux Victorian metal door handles for vintage Bakelite ones, fussy curtains for crisp white linen, and replaced pendant lights with mid-century glass designs. Harley had proof of this too, which explained why Miranda had taken the lives of both men.

These “sit flush against the ceiling to maximise the sense of height and give continuity to each room,” Read says. Whether it’s sculpture or a painting, we like to have some huge things that mess with the sense of scale Becky Nolan The couple’s landlady had been planning to replace the kitchen and bathroom floors, so the couple were able to steer her towards terracotta quarry tiles, which match the tiles on the canal-side terrace. To everyone's relief, Florence had thought ahead. ‘It was terrifying to put the windows in because we were basically just cutting a hole in our future home. But there have been compromises. “There were limits to what we could do,” Nolan says. As a gunshot rang out, we saw that Florence had fired it, hitting Miranda in the arm before arresting her for all three murders. “We just have to live with kitchen and bathroom fittinngs that wouldn’t be our choice. Adjusting to the smaller space was a challenge, but Joe and Ruby have no regrets.

” When they moved in, the plan was to create an uncluttered look. Mayor Catherine Bordey (Elizabeth Bourgine) suggested that staying on the island might not be what was best for the young woman after all, referencing"difficult memories" for Florence after her fiancé Patrice was killed in season eight. “We had big ideas about being minimalist, having a lot of empty white space,” Nolan recalls with a laugh. “But we are natural collectors: we love art and are always finding new pieces. In turn, Neville told Florence she had"made this island a home" for him, and declared how much he was going to miss her. ‘Before the move we were paying £1,000 a month just on rent.” The canalside terrace off the living room, with a 70s safari-style chair. Photograph: Rachael Smith Much of it is surprisingly large for a small flat, such as a big abstract painting that sits alongside a low-slung 1970s sofa by Vico Magistretti, or an amorphic ceramic sculpture in the small hallway. While we recover from all the drama, not to mention the loss of fan-favourite Jobert, we're left wondering what's in store for those left behind.

“Whether it’s sculpture or a painting, we like to have some huge things that mess with the sense of scale,” Nolan says. “It actually makes the room feel bigger.” With its white walls and focus on art and sculpture, the flat does have a contemplative, gallery-like atmosphere, but tactile rugs and warm woods prevent it from feeling sterile. The couple’s choice of pieces to sell at the Peanut Vendor is just as carefully thought out. “When we’re looking for stock, we ask ourselves if we would have this in our home,” Read says.

In a crowded market of mid-century design dealers, the couple are constantly striving to find unexpected and challenging pieces, from a post-modern Italian armchair with a red leather sunburst motif to chunky wooden chairs. “These one-off pieces always seem to sell quickly,” Nolan says. They source many of their pieces at trade-only fairs in France, where dealers gather from across Europe. “We go to flea markets too, if there’s time. We used to go for a lot of Scandinavian design; now we’re into Italian modern and post-modern pieces.

” Their thoughtful edit has attracted an appreciative following among influential interior designers such as Kelly Wearstler and Faye Toogood, who snap up vintage pieces to bring depth to their projects. Becky’s pottery studio in the guest bedrooom. Photograph: Rachael Smith The Peanut Vendor name comes from an old Cuban jazz song. “We just liked it and didn’t want anything that tied us down to a particular genre or era,” says Read. Starting the business, in 2008, was a leap of faith for the couple, who were then just a year into their relationship .

“We began with a small shop and spent time looking at what other dealers were doing,” Read says. “We saw that many just had a basic holding page website. I think our big strength was to have a proper online shop from the start.” In the early days, they had to bolster their finances by working in pubs. “It took us about four years to really learn the business side,” Nolan says.

In 2015 they upgraded to a large showroom. It’s open by appointment, which frees them up for buying trips in France and Italy. “We’ve had no problem selling over the past two years, but it’s been harder to buy stock and, with Brexit, it’s also more of a challenge,” Read says. “Now we need to arrange shipping, permits and paperwork, which many of our dealers just aren’t set up for. It’s will make everything more complicated, and expensive.

” On a more positive note, Nolan has used the lockdowns to become an accomplished ceramicist. “A friend bought me a course at .

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Was this a paid advert for their business? Because as far as I know no Landlord stipulates what furniture you put in your rented accommodation. But the white coloured walls were absolutely amazing, and so unusual

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Sat 29 Jan 2022 08., only for her to gently reply that she loved him as a friend.The couple were tired of spending £1,000 a month on rent alone (Picture: Mercury Press) Fed up of renting while their friends jumped on the property ladder, couple Joe Carter and Ruby Gove, both 28, decided to do something a bit different.Kym Marsh will continue to co-host with Gethin, and Kimberley Walsh and Sara Cox are also set to become permanent members of the team.

00 GMT P eriod features were conspicuously absent from Becky Nolan and Barny Read’s flat-hunting wishlist. The couple, who run the Peanut Vendor , a 20th-century design store in east London, were living in a Victorian flat but decided a more modern space would better showcase their collections of abstract art and esoteric furniture. She posed as an au pair for a woman named Miranda Priestley (Victoria Ekanoye) – no, not the ruthless magazine editor from The Devil Wears Prada , but a murderous drug trafficker. “We were ready for a change from bay windows and wonky walls; we wanted to try an art gallery-style white box,” Read says. ‘We didn’t want to stop seeing people and going places but it’s so difficult to have a life at the same time as saving. They found a two-bedroom flat built in the 1990s to rent and were hooked by its two small terraces, front and back. Ultimately, the events that followed led to the detective leaving the island for the second time. The flat itself was uninspiring. BBC’s Head of Daytime & Early Peak Carla-Maria Lawson said of the move: “Telling stories that authentically reflect the concerns and interests of viewers from across the whole of the UK has played a huge part in the incredible success of Morning Live and the move to our new home in Manchester will give us scope to give voice to an even wider range of communities.

“It was nondescript and a bit tired, with lots of magnolia,” Nolan recalls. Originally based in Jamaica, Florence joined Miranda and her family on a trip back to Saint Marie, but their stay at a farm led to the death of owner Harley Joseph (Ben Onwukwe). To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video The makeover took a lot of time, money (£8,000 just on the renovations, to be exact), and effort, but it’s oh so worth it – especially because the couple now save over £730 a month on bills and rent. But a quick peep under the beige carpets revealed a concrete screed floor: “We thought that had potential,” Read says. Becky and Barny: ‘We had big ideas about being minimalist, having a lot of empty white space. Neville and Commissioner Selwyn Patterson (Don Warrington) were quick to prioritise Florence's safety, while the woman herself delved further into the case and discovered just how dangerous Miranda really was.’ Photograph: Rachael Smith With their landlady’s approval, they painted the walls brilliant white, resin-coated the concrete floor and removed and stored the existing fittings, “so we can reinstate them when we leave”. The van cost just £5k (Picture: Mercury Press & Media Ltd) ‘It was such a new process for the both of us – we had no idea what we were doing. They swapped faux Victorian metal door handles for vintage Bakelite ones, fussy curtains for crisp white linen, and replaced pendant lights with mid-century glass designs. Harley had proof of this too, which explained why Miranda had taken the lives of both men.

These “sit flush against the ceiling to maximise the sense of height and give continuity to each room,” Read says. Whether it’s sculpture or a painting, we like to have some huge things that mess with the sense of scale Becky Nolan The couple’s landlady had been planning to replace the kitchen and bathroom floors, so the couple were able to steer her towards terracotta quarry tiles, which match the tiles on the canal-side terrace. To everyone's relief, Florence had thought ahead. ‘It was terrifying to put the windows in because we were basically just cutting a hole in our future home. But there have been compromises. “There were limits to what we could do,” Nolan says. As a gunshot rang out, we saw that Florence had fired it, hitting Miranda in the arm before arresting her for all three murders. “We just have to live with kitchen and bathroom fittinngs that wouldn’t be our choice. Adjusting to the smaller space was a challenge, but Joe and Ruby have no regrets.

” When they moved in, the plan was to create an uncluttered look. Mayor Catherine Bordey (Elizabeth Bourgine) suggested that staying on the island might not be what was best for the young woman after all, referencing"difficult memories" for Florence after her fiancé Patrice was killed in season eight. “We had big ideas about being minimalist, having a lot of empty white space,” Nolan recalls with a laugh. “But we are natural collectors: we love art and are always finding new pieces. In turn, Neville told Florence she had"made this island a home" for him, and declared how much he was going to miss her. ‘Before the move we were paying £1,000 a month just on rent.” The canalside terrace off the living room, with a 70s safari-style chair. Photograph: Rachael Smith Much of it is surprisingly large for a small flat, such as a big abstract painting that sits alongside a low-slung 1970s sofa by Vico Magistretti, or an amorphic ceramic sculpture in the small hallway. While we recover from all the drama, not to mention the loss of fan-favourite Jobert, we're left wondering what's in store for those left behind.

“Whether it’s sculpture or a painting, we like to have some huge things that mess with the sense of scale,” Nolan says. “It actually makes the room feel bigger.” With its white walls and focus on art and sculpture, the flat does have a contemplative, gallery-like atmosphere, but tactile rugs and warm woods prevent it from feeling sterile. The couple’s choice of pieces to sell at the Peanut Vendor is just as carefully thought out. “When we’re looking for stock, we ask ourselves if we would have this in our home,” Read says.

In a crowded market of mid-century design dealers, the couple are constantly striving to find unexpected and challenging pieces, from a post-modern Italian armchair with a red leather sunburst motif to chunky wooden chairs. “These one-off pieces always seem to sell quickly,” Nolan says. They source many of their pieces at trade-only fairs in France, where dealers gather from across Europe. “We go to flea markets too, if there’s time. We used to go for a lot of Scandinavian design; now we’re into Italian modern and post-modern pieces.

” Their thoughtful edit has attracted an appreciative following among influential interior designers such as Kelly Wearstler and Faye Toogood, who snap up vintage pieces to bring depth to their projects. Becky’s pottery studio in the guest bedrooom. Photograph: Rachael Smith The Peanut Vendor name comes from an old Cuban jazz song. “We just liked it and didn’t want anything that tied us down to a particular genre or era,” says Read. Starting the business, in 2008, was a leap of faith for the couple, who were then just a year into their relationship .

“We began with a small shop and spent time looking at what other dealers were doing,” Read says. “We saw that many just had a basic holding page website. I think our big strength was to have a proper online shop from the start.” In the early days, they had to bolster their finances by working in pubs. “It took us about four years to really learn the business side,” Nolan says.

In 2015 they upgraded to a large showroom. It’s open by appointment, which frees them up for buying trips in France and Italy. “We’ve had no problem selling over the past two years, but it’s been harder to buy stock and, with Brexit, it’s also more of a challenge,” Read says. “Now we need to arrange shipping, permits and paperwork, which many of our dealers just aren’t set up for. It’s will make everything more complicated, and expensive.

” On a more positive note, Nolan has used the lockdowns to become an accomplished ceramicist. “A friend bought me a course at .