Syrian protesters call for Assad's downfall as economic crisis deepens

6/12/2020 10:54:00 PM

Syrian protesters call for Assad's downfall as economic crisis deepens

Syria, Bashar Al-Assad

Syria n protesters call for Assad's downfall as economic crisis deepens

Marches held on streets of Sweida amid soaring food prices and disillusion with corruption

A town in regime-controlled Syria is set for fresh protests this weekend as a burgeoning economic crisis engulfing even Bashar al-Assad’s most loyal supporters is now posing the biggest challenge to his grip on the country in years.Virgin Atlantic has become the latest airline to leave a vapour trail of furious customers who are now being told they will have to wait up to four months to receive refunds for cancelled flights.The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said 41,481 people had died in hospitals, care homes and the wider community after testing positive for coronavirus in the UK as of 5pm on Thursday, up by 202 from 41,279 the day before.Prince William has said the return of the Premier League will "provide the nation with a much needed relief" when matches kick off again next week.

Food is now more expensive than at any other time during the nine-year conflict, triggering scenes reminiscent of the Arab spring protests of 2011 on the streets of the nominally government-loyal town of Sweida this week. “We don’t want to live, we want to die in dignity,” and “He who starves his people is a traitor,” protesters chanted as they marched for consecutive days in the southern city, calling for the president’s downfall. Ryanair, easyJet and British Airways initially bore the brunt of consumer ire, but Virgin Atlantic customers have this week accused the company of not processing refunds in order to prop up the company. Another march is scheduled for Saturday. Overall, a total of 6,434,713 tests have been carried out and 292,950 cases have been confirmed positive. Assad is currently struggling on multiple fronts, including the threat of the coronavirus, a feud with Syria’s richest man, his cousin Rami Makhlouf, and balancing the divergent interests of his backers in Moscow and Tehran. The airline’s social media channels are bearing the brunt of anger as well. The president’s biggest problem by far, however, is the financial turmoil next door in Lebanon, which has helped send the Syrian economy into meltdown. "You’ll provide the nation with a much needed relief and boost for their mental health seeing some football back again so it’s really good news.

New US sanctions against his regime that come into force next week could be potentially devastating. Syria’s currency has already nosedived in recent months, falling this week to a record 3,500 pounds to the dollar on the black market, compared with 700 at the beginning of the year. As a result, the cost of living has soared and basics such as flour, sugar, rice and medicine are increasingly hard to find. More than 80% of the country now lives below the poverty line, while the children of regime officials show off sports cars, jewellery and technological gadgets on their Instagram accounts. On Thursday, Assad sacked his prime minister, Imad Khamis, in an attempt to mollify growing public anger, but even in Assadist strongholds such as the coastal city of Latakia people are becoming bolder in their criticism of regime corruption. The north London club stars joked about them beating his team Aston Villa in the 2015 FA Cup Final, with William replying: “I wondered how long it would take before you brought that up.

Public figures including MPs, business leaders and members of the army have all openly criticised government policy in recent weeks. “When your kids are hungry, you don’t think of strongmen, you don’t think of what Russia wants, you don’t worry about geopolitics. You blame the person who is in charge. And I see it happening on a daily basis, from people way up in the regime all the way [down] to the average loyalist,” said the activist Shueb Rifai. “Assad’s biggest risk is no longer what Putin wants, or what Iran wants, or what regional powers are scheming. I think there’s going to be, sadly, a lot of repercussions from this in society, not just in football, in terms of people’s mental health.

It is his own people, sitting in a pressure cooker.” Meanwhile, in north-western Idlib province, the last part of the country controlled by Sunni opposition groups, the currency collapse has caused the price of bread to spike by 60%, triggering demonstrations against Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), the dominant jihadist group in the area. While the Turkish lira has been in circulation in rebel areas for years, HTS’s civilian wing announced on Thursday that it will begin paying salaries in the Turkish currency to insulate the local population from the Syrian pound’s continued fall. Despite a ceasefire brokered by Ankara and Moscow, this week also saw Russian warplanes carry out the first airstrikes on Idlib and the surrounding area in three months, in which at least three people were killed. The push to retake Idlib at the beginning of this year caused the worst displacement crisis of Syria’s war to date, driving 1 million people from their homes to already overcrowded camps on the Turkish border.

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Good Riddance. AlistairBurtUK Syrian people live in hell cause of your intervention in their civil war. Hypocrisy. I'm sure they do. Ask Iran and Russia. Assad is a puppet. Defeated by the Dollar after all? Bet they don’t last long.. Worst moustache ever Holy shit, after what the bastad did last time. That is real bravery.

Guardian worried about Israel He took it well last time. The economic crisis deepens because we isolate Syria after we supported a terrorist uprising there.

UK coronavirus live: economy slumps as Boris Johnson faces calls for inquiry into health crisisBritish economy sees biggest monthly slump on record while families of coronavirus victims call for inquiry into government handling of pandemic Не круто.. When you have a habitual liar as a leader with blood on his hands, any enquiry into the many failures will go nowhere and at best Johnson will blame everyone else or hide behind his numerous sycophants Health enquiry? What about the £60,000 blood money promised by MattHancock to the families of dead frontline staff especially foreign workers or was this yet another lie?

La verdad es que el rey Felipe está más guapo con barba

UK coronavirus live: Boris Johnson insists economy can bounce back after being 'badly hit'PM also tells protesters ‘the only responsible course of action is to stay away’; first ministers of Scotland and Wales call for Brexit extension Hmm I’m not convinced He sounds so much like Trump now it's hard to tell where Trump ends and Boris Begins. Yeah sure it will Boris🙄

Prince William says Premier League will 'provide nation with much needed relief'The Duke of Cambridge spoke to Arsenal manager Mikel Arteta and some players on a virtual call about the impact the coronavirus crisis has had on their mental health Is that so important, I'm getting tired of this shit nowadays, we defend this country because the cops are stupid

'I was falsely accused of burning the union jack'Why did people accuse this Black Lives Matter protester of desecrating a war memorial? Was he also falsely accused of claiming the UK invented racism? Stop protesting it’s all wrong you are all being used 🥴 torrance racist lady full video

Protester ‘in coma’ after Confederate monument hits his head while being pulled downVirginia protester ‘placed in coma’ after Confederate monument hits him on head while being pulled down If it hit them on the head the adage 'No sense No feeling' springs to mind

Protester 'seriously injured' after torn down Confederate monument hits themFootage of the incident shows the statue give way after being pulled by protesters 😭😭 'It's 'karma,' heh-heh' said the 'non-racist.' Ha ha I hope he could breathe

A town in regime-controlled Syria is set for fresh protests this weekend as a burgeoning economic crisis engulfing even Bashar al-Assad’s most loyal supporters is now posing the biggest challenge to his grip on the country in years.Virgin Atlantic has become the latest airline to leave a vapour trail of furious customers who are now being told they will have to wait up to four months to receive refunds for cancelled flights.The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said 41,481 people had died in hospitals, care homes and the wider community after testing positive for coronavirus in the UK as of 5pm on Thursday, up by 202 from 41,279 the day before.Prince William has said the return of the Premier League will "provide the nation with a much needed relief" when matches kick off again next week.

Food is now more expensive than at any other time during the nine-year conflict, triggering scenes reminiscent of the Arab spring protests of 2011 on the streets of the nominally government-loyal town of Sweida this week. “We don’t want to live, we want to die in dignity,” and “He who starves his people is a traitor,” protesters chanted as they marched for consecutive days in the southern city, calling for the president’s downfall. Ryanair, easyJet and British Airways initially bore the brunt of consumer ire, but Virgin Atlantic customers have this week accused the company of not processing refunds in order to prop up the company. Another march is scheduled for Saturday. Overall, a total of 6,434,713 tests have been carried out and 292,950 cases have been confirmed positive. Assad is currently struggling on multiple fronts, including the threat of the coronavirus, a feud with Syria’s richest man, his cousin Rami Makhlouf, and balancing the divergent interests of his backers in Moscow and Tehran. The airline’s social media channels are bearing the brunt of anger as well. The president’s biggest problem by far, however, is the financial turmoil next door in Lebanon, which has helped send the Syrian economy into meltdown. "You’ll provide the nation with a much needed relief and boost for their mental health seeing some football back again so it’s really good news.

New US sanctions against his regime that come into force next week could be potentially devastating. Syria’s currency has already nosedived in recent months, falling this week to a record 3,500 pounds to the dollar on the black market, compared with 700 at the beginning of the year. As a result, the cost of living has soared and basics such as flour, sugar, rice and medicine are increasingly hard to find. More than 80% of the country now lives below the poverty line, while the children of regime officials show off sports cars, jewellery and technological gadgets on their Instagram accounts. On Thursday, Assad sacked his prime minister, Imad Khamis, in an attempt to mollify growing public anger, but even in Assadist strongholds such as the coastal city of Latakia people are becoming bolder in their criticism of regime corruption. The north London club stars joked about them beating his team Aston Villa in the 2015 FA Cup Final, with William replying: “I wondered how long it would take before you brought that up.

Public figures including MPs, business leaders and members of the army have all openly criticised government policy in recent weeks. “When your kids are hungry, you don’t think of strongmen, you don’t think of what Russia wants, you don’t worry about geopolitics. You blame the person who is in charge. And I see it happening on a daily basis, from people way up in the regime all the way [down] to the average loyalist,” said the activist Shueb Rifai. “Assad’s biggest risk is no longer what Putin wants, or what Iran wants, or what regional powers are scheming. I think there’s going to be, sadly, a lot of repercussions from this in society, not just in football, in terms of people’s mental health.

It is his own people, sitting in a pressure cooker.” Meanwhile, in north-western Idlib province, the last part of the country controlled by Sunni opposition groups, the currency collapse has caused the price of bread to spike by 60%, triggering demonstrations against Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), the dominant jihadist group in the area. While the Turkish lira has been in circulation in rebel areas for years, HTS’s civilian wing announced on Thursday that it will begin paying salaries in the Turkish currency to insulate the local population from the Syrian pound’s continued fall. Despite a ceasefire brokered by Ankara and Moscow, this week also saw Russian warplanes carry out the first airstrikes on Idlib and the surrounding area in three months, in which at least three people were killed. The push to retake Idlib at the beginning of this year caused the worst displacement crisis of Syria’s war to date, driving 1 million people from their homes to already overcrowded camps on the Turkish border.

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