Senate Vote to Support Roe v. Wade, Abortion Access Falls Short

5/12/2022 12:11:00 AM

A bill seeking to incorporate Roe v. Wade abortion access into federal law failed to pass a Senate vote to overcome a filibuster on Wednesday.

JUST IN: What appears to be the first of several efforts in Congress to preserve Roe v. Wade abortion access through federal law failed to pass a Senate vote to overcome a filibuster.

A bill seeking to incorporate Roe v. Wade abortion access into federal law failed to pass a Senate vote to overcome a filibuster on Wednesday.

draft Supreme Court opinion to overturn the Roe decision that many had believed to be settled law.Make informed decisions with the FT Keep abreast of significant corporate, financial and political developments around the world.Make informed decisions with the FT Keep abreast of significant corporate, financial and political developments around the world.smithinamerica Tue 10 May 2022 07.

The outcome of the conservative-majority court's actual ruling, expected this summer, is sure to reverberate around the country and on the campaign trail ahead of the fall midterm elections that will determine which party controls Congress.Security was tight at the Capitol where Vice President Kamala Harris presided, and it has been bolstered across the street at the Supreme Court after protesters turned out in force last week following the leaked draft.Choose your subscription Try full digital access and see why over 1 million readers subscribe to the FT 1 € for 4 weeks.Scores of House Democratic lawmakers marched protest-style to the Senate and briefly watched from the visitor galleries.Harris can provide a tie-breaking vote in the 50-50 split Senate, but that was beside the point on Wednesday.One conservative Democrat, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, voted with the Republicans, saying he supported keeping Roe v.Every child has a right to life.

Wade but believed the current bill was too broad.Over several days, Democratic senators delivered speeches contending that undoing abortion access would mean great harm, not only for women but for all Americans planning families and futures.During a Senate committee hearing Tuesday, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen was questioned about the potential impact of an abortion ban on the American economy.Sen.Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev.” The national day of prayer last Thursday was anything but a solemn occasion outside the supreme court in Washington, where hours earlier an unscalable , reminiscent of the one that surrounded the US Capitol after the January 6 insurrection.

, said that most American women have only known a world where abortion access was guaranteed but could face a future with fewer rights than their mothers or grandmothers.“That means women will not have the same control over their lives and bodies as men do, and that’s wrong,” she said in the run-up to Wednesday’s vote.Few Republican senators spoke in favor of ending abortion access, but they embraced the filibuster to block the bill from advancing.Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, an architect of the effort to install conservative justices on the Supreme Court — including three during the Trump era — has sought to downplay the outcome of any potential changes in federal abortion policy.“This issue will be dealt with at the state level,” McConnell said.Liberal states would become sanctuaries for women seeking abortions and saturated with providers; conservative states would turn into deserts that ban the procedure and criminalise doctors who provide it.

Some other Republicans, including Sen.John Thune of South Dakota, argue that the House-passed bill is more extreme than Roe, and would expand abortion access beyond what is already the law.About half the states already have approved laws that would further restrict or ban abortions, including some trigger laws that would take effect once the court rules.Polls show that most Americans want to preserve access to abortion in the earlier stages of pregnancy, but views are more nuanced and mixed when it comes to later-term abortions.States and the Department of Justice are waging court battles over the right to abortion that the Supreme Court outlined in Roe v.” The supreme court’s draft majority opinion, written by Samuel Alito and circulated on 10 February, on Monday.

Wade.But in 1992, Planned Parenthood v.Casey, a key case that was less widely known, paved the way for some abortion restrictions - as long as they didn't meet the definition of an "undue burden." With help from Florida State law professor Mary Ziegler, we break it down in this LXplanation.The draft court ruling on a case from Mississippi suggested the majority of conservative justices are prepared to end the federal right to abortion, leaving it to the states to decide.Some such laws ban abortions almost completely while others would outlaw it after six or 15 weeks.

Whatever the Supreme Court says this summer, it will almost guarantee a new phase of political fighting in Congress over abortion policy, filibuster rules and the most basic rights to health care, privacy and protecting the unborn.Before Wednesday's vote, White House deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said the administration's position has been clear:"We will defend women’s constitutional rights recognized in Roe v.Wade.” In recent years, abortion debates have come to a political draw in Congress.Bills would come up for votes — to expand or limit services — only to fail along party lines or be stripped out of broader legislative packages.Republicans in Louisiana are even considering a bill that would allow prosecutors to charge those having abortions with homicide.

In the House, where Democrats have the majority, lawmakers approved the abortion-rights Women’s Health Protection Act last year on a largely party line vote after the Supreme Court first signaled it was considering the issue by allowing a Texas law’s ban to take effect.But the bill has languished in the Senate, evenly split with bare Democratic control because of Harris’ ability to cast a tie-breaking vote.Wednesday's failure renewed calls to change Senate rules to do away with the high-bar filibuster threshold, at least on this issue.The two Republican senators who support abortion access — Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who faces her own reelection in November, and Susan Collins of Maine — were also no votes, having proposed their own more tailored approach to counter the Supreme Court’s potential action.Both of the Republican senators, who voted to confirm most of former President Donald Trump’s justices, are in talks over alternatives.This is likely to be especially difficult for women in poverty, often including women of colour, and lead to a sharp climb in unsafe abortions.

But Democrats have largely panned the Collins-Murkowski effort as insufficient' "I plan to continue working with my colleagues on legislation to maintain – not expand or restrict – the current legal framework for abortion rights in this country,” Collins said in a statement.Pressure is building on those two senators to join most Democrats in changing the filibuster rules, but that appears unlikely.Five years ago, it was McConnell who changed Senate rules to selectively do away with the filibuster to confirm Trump’s justices after blocking Barack Obama’s choice of Merrick Garland to fill a Supreme Court vacancy at the start of the 2016 presidential campaign, leaving the seat open for Trump to fill after he won the White House.Both parties face enormous pressure to convince voters they are doing all they can — the Democrats working to preserve abortion access, the Republicans to limit or end it — with the fall elections coming up.The congressional campaign committees are fundraising off the abortion issue, and working furiously to energize voters who are already primed to engage.Photograph: Allison Bailey/NurPhoto/REX/Shutterstock.

Associated Press writers Mary Clare Jalonick, Kevin Freking, Darlene Superville and Farnoush Amiri in Washington and David Sharp in Maine contributed to this report.Copyright AP - Associated Press.

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Why don’t they try crafting a compromise bill that would get some GOP to vote for it EnemyOfThePeople must have the sads! First sentence was misleading, the Dems knew it would not pass.

Roe vs Wade reversal would be ‘very damaging’ for economy, warns Yellen\n\t\t\tKeep abreast of significant corporate, financial and political developments around the world.\n\t\t\tStay informed and spot emerging risks and opportunities with independent global reporting, expert\n\t\t\tcommentary and analysis you can trust.\n\t\t More little mouths to feed. Heartless Yellen SecYellen IngrahamAngle RepCarlos GovRonDeSantis marcorubio SenTomCotton look at my boobs😘

How would the repeal of Roe vs Wade shape abortion access in the US?\n\t\t\tKeep abreast of significant corporate, financial and political developments around the world.\n\t\t\tStay informed and spot emerging risks and opportunities with independent global reporting, expert\n\t\t\tcommentary and analysis you can trust.\n\t\t look at my boobs😘

Divided States of America: Roe v Wade is ‘precursor to larger struggles’The demise of the 1973 ruling could drive the biggest wedge yet between what appears to be two irreconcilable nations Otherwise known as the end of the Republican Party. I disagree. The 'larger struggles' are already here, this Roe v Wade business is an overheated attempt to cover up the disastrous Storms that REALLY ENGULF US that the Media and Leadership will not face with courage, character, or truth. 80% of 🇺🇸 support Reproductive Rights. Even more support emergency care for women with life-threatening pregnancy complications. We can win this fight by sharing one simple message. A non-viable embryo CANNOT have more rights than the woman carrying it.

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