Ray tracing in F1 22 is not worth the penalty to performance

6/28/2022 11:39:00 PM

Gorgeous yes, performant no.

Type_Other, Channel_Gaming_Hardware

F1 22 looks great with ray tracing but be prepared for major performance drops with everything enabled.

Gorgeous yes, performant no.

Unsurprisingly, it's the ray-traced reflections that are the worst offender when it comes to killing your frame rate. This is usually the case, as rendering shiny materials, and how they reflect the light from objects around them, is a very intensive operation. Even more so if you have many bounces, meaning a reflection will be seen in the reflection of another object, and so on and so fourth to a set number of bounces total. 

Sadly, reflections are also one of the more visually impactful effects of the four. At the very least ray-traced reflections are the most noticeable while you're actually driving around a track at 200 mph. Yet I still can't stomach the frame rate drop required to run them.

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Ummm, that completely depends on the gpu. Using in-game bench, all settings ultra high including RT 3440x1440 on 5900x w/3090 min 71 avg 83 without DLSS. DLSS on quality min 111 avg 129. That is on Bahrain at dusk with lots of lights and reflections. So plenty playable. Just turn dlss/fsr on then Interesting Wasn't RTS developed to free up resources elsewhere for better performance and better visuals? 🤔

I thought in your review you said that the ray tracing wasn't noticeable and pointless because of being in a racing game? 🤔 You sure? RT on high running at 1440p on a 3070 and getting a solid 110fps. runs at 70fps+ with DLSS , how is that not good enough ?

F1 22 review - the best F1 game yet can't quite match last year's modelCodemasters' F1 series has another fine outing - and finally adds VR - but elsewhere the additions are slim. The Eurogamer review

F1 22 review F1 22 is the most convincing and exhaustive simulation of the sport so far. Check out our review: back pain sim when It take 10 minutes of talking and the game playing for you to start a race in this one too? All I need is a whisper to the car through the mic function so I can Coach it through the corners. 😂😂😂

Review: F1 22 adds as much as it takes away | VGCCodemasters and EA’s latest is another winner, even if it doesn’t reinvent the wheel

F1 22 game review: A worthy upgrade, despite glamorisationGAME REVIEW: F12022 is the 13th successive official F1 game created by Codemasters, but it's the first since the $1.2 billion buyout by EA SPORTS 🤑 So what's new? Find out 👇 You really haven't sold it to me. Sounds like a lot of utterly irrelevant tat (customisable wallpaper/clothes etc, really?) and an alright racing aspect, but nothing to make me sit up and go 'WOW what a game' Thirteen years of Bugmasters producing a mediocre game sometimes unplayable at launch title and everyone pays for a game just to sit and wait for the update....EA have in my opinion made better sports games so let's see what next year's or 2024 title will be like. It would be good if I could play it

F1 22 review: EA's return to series sets up new solid foundation F1 22 is a must buy for die-hard F1 fans, and an essential racer for the more casual gamer as EA Sports makes its return to the series.

Torquing Point: British Grand Prix preview and a look at F1 22On this week's episode of TorquingPoint, HenryValantine and samcooper_ look ahead to Silverstone as well as a preview of the new F122game

(opens in new tab) Unsurprisingly, it's the ray-traced reflections that are the worst offender when it comes to killing your frame rate.Played on Xbox Series X and PC Availability: Out July 1 on PS4, PS5, Xbox One, Xbox S/X and PC F1 22 isn't exactly a bold new era for Codemasters' long-running series, and a familiar racer it most certainly is.See all prices (8 found) F1 is properly back in vogue thanks to the Hamilton/Verstappen controversy of last year's finale, Netflix's Drive to Survive docuseries, and closer racing thanks to sweeping rule changes.Codemasters are trumpeting as the latest big addition to the series.

This is usually the case, as rendering shiny materials, and how they reflect the light from objects around them, is a very intensive operation. Even more so if you have many bounces, meaning a reflection will be seen in the reflection of another object, and so on and so fourth to a set number of bounces total. F1 22 reflects that, for better but mostly for worse, with its new F1 Life feature that lets you kit out your avatar with fresh threads while decorating your pad with gaudy artwork on the walls and a supercar on display in the living room.  Sadly, reflections are also one of the more visually impactful effects of the four. So why does F1 22 start off by focusing on soft furnishings? Well. At the very least ray-traced reflections are the most noticeable while you're actually driving around a track at 200 mph. The AI puts up a decent illusion of a fight, once you find the sweetspot with its difficulty slider, offering robust yet respectful fights on-track. Yet I still can't stomach the frame rate drop required to run them.” Of course, over time players will be able to unlock new furniture and avatar customisation options as part of the returning Podium Pass, the game’s ‘battle pass’ system which lets players earn XP through challenges and collect rewards along the way.

Ray-traced shadows (opens in new tab) Ray-traced shadows are some of the least immediately noticeable while actually playing F1 22. They're very different beasts, demanding a more lairy approach to driving and always inviting you to throw the rear end out in an act of bravado. It's not very interactive, though; you can only flick between rooms with left and right, rather than walk around your new abode, and the cosmetic options are pretty limited. In theory, ray-traced shadows allow for much wider range of shadow, from soft to hard, than otherwise possible with traditional rendering. It's not easy to see this in the images above, but scroll down to the pictures of the Williams in Brazil and you can see the strong shadow lines beneath the nose of the car in the image with ray-traced shadows enabled. The supercars work well enough, and while they're not going to be troubling the likes of Assetto Corsa and Gran Turismo when it comes to how they feel I've been impressed with how Codemasters - and, more specifically, handling guru David Greco - have adapted a game that's historically had a very different focus. For what it's worth, ray-traced shadows have a much smaller impact on performance than reflections or ambient occlusion. Still, you can see the attraction. Yet it's still a lot of performance to lose over some fairly minor improvements to the overall image. As a foundation for wherever Codemasters wants to take them next it's promising stuff, but most importantly as a temporary distraction from the single-seaters they more than do the trick. The most interesting part of the new F1 Life mode is the addition of supercars, which can be driven in time trials or a series of 40 special ‘Pirelli Hot Laps’ challenges.

Ray-traced ambient occlusion (opens in new tab) Ambient occlusion (AO) is most noticeable when in cockpit view, namely across the steering wheel and gloves. It's a subtle difference between ray-traced AO and traditional AO, but overall the ray-traced cockpit appears less flat than the traditionally rendered one. F1 22's cars are faithful to a new flavour of car that are at present - the gorgeous aesthetics of that Ferrari aside - not a particularly endearing bunch. Supercars can be driven in Time Trial or in 'Pirelli Hot Laps' challenges, of which there are 40, scattered throughout career mode or accessible via their own menu to tackle in three difficulty tiers. The finely-meshed carbon and cloth appear to react more as you'd expect them to in the lighting conditions with ray-traced AO enabled. Ray-traced transparent reflections (opens in new tab) Ray-traced transparent reflections apply to objects that both reflect and refract light. There's a lot to manage in a modern F1 car, which you're free to do yourself or instead call upon assistance with the likes of ERS and DRS deployment. Say, a visor, in the context of Formula One, but more often you'll see this in windows and the like. They're comparatively slow and unwieldy and you'd surely have already bought Assetto Corsa if you wanted to drive these things. Naturally, there are new additions to fit the F1 2022 season.

It's another effect that has only a marginal overall impact on the game's visuals, yet does sap quite a bit of performance. There's a new stiffness to them as they clatter along kerbs (not enough to give you the back pains suffered by the likes of Sir Lewis after Baku's grand prix, but enough to give you an ache in your hands after a mid-length race) while you can feel that extra weight in low-speed cornering. Still, it's actually one of the least impactful ray-traced effects in F1 22. That's not me saying to turn it on, however. It's impressive, but placed in direct contrast to last year's offering it never feels quite as engaging and underlines the suspicion that this new generation of F1 car has presented a field of - to borrow a purely technical term - shitboxes. It's the F1 you're here for and, frankly, the supercars' inclusion only highlights why F1 exists. A lot to lose for so little gained. Below: Here's a look at all those settings again but this time from an exterior shot. The relationship between the two has been strengthened further with driver ratings that will now reflect real-life events (and that make for some fun viewing on the F1's official YouTube channel as the drivers learn their scores for the first time). This time there’s no story mode at all, meaning solo players will have to make do with the existing Career mode, the 40 Pirelli Hot Laps supercar challenges and the regular daily challenges designed to give XP for the Podium Pass unlockables.

The William's exposed carbon does look beautiful in-game. 'My Team' returns, allowing you to start a new F1 team from scratch, acting as owner, team principal and driver, all at once and doing everything from driving to allowing your second driver some extra sim time. Image . In-game graphics now properly match those of the real broadcast - though arguably the best option is being able to swap out David Croft for Alex Jacques on comms.