'Partygate allegations have exposed the true Boris': Readers on the week's biggest stories

From the ‘partygate’ allegations to the crisis in Ukraine, find out what our readers were talking about this week

Vladimir Putin, Boris Johnson

1/28/2022 8:48:00 PM

🗣️ 'We need to find another leader, so who is going to stand up to the plate?' From the ‘partygate’ allegations to the crisis in Ukraine , Telegraph readers have their say on this week's biggest stories 👇

From the ‘partygate’ allegations to the crisis in Ukraine , find out what our readers were talking about this week

This could be the moment the establishment finally takes down Boris Johnson Camilla Tominey assessed the 'partygate' scandal so far and concluded that aspects of the situation, such as Ms Gray’s desire to have the report published in full, suggest that there is only so much power the most powerful man in the country can wield. Our readers expressed their disappointment over the scandal and discussed whether Boris Johnson could and should survive 'partygate'.

'Good judgement at the top looks severely lacking' @Adam Smith:"Boris Johnson should stay, for now. It is up to the public to announce his time is up, not political enemies who would have happily overturned the 2016 Brexit vote (in which I voted to remain) and the 2019 General Election result.

Read more: The Telegraph »

Woman's Hour - Michelle Kholos Brooks, Monica McWilliams, Mandy Garner, Cecilia Floren, Sophie Willan - BBC Sounds

The women who tasted Adolf Hitler’s food. Read more >>

Peston: Boris Johnson slammed over ‘Partygate’ by Labour frontbencher - ‘Taking the mickeyBORIS JOHNSON has been slammed by a Labour frontbencher who claimed the public is 'bored' by the wait for the Sue Gray report into the alleged lockdown parties.

Boris Johnson Accused Of Leading 'Zombie Government' Distracted By Partygate RowDowning Street has been forced to deny the prime minister is paralysed by ongoing controversy. He looks always paralysed. With government.

Partygate report 'should have minimal reference to potential crimes'In an extraordinary shift, it has emerged that police have told the Cabinet Office the long-awaited report should feature 'minimal reference' to the most serious lockdown breaches. THIS should be your headline along with 8 or 9 side stories! We've waited for this report, and now that corruption has squashed the report about PARTYGATE, to NOT INCLUDE ANYTHING ABOUT PARTYGATE, THIS should be today's HUGE breaking story, and you put 1 medium sized story out Has nobody bothered to Google or Wiki the fact that Cressida Dick and Boris Johnson went to the same Oxford college? 2/2 times and is an outright liar. This is seen on tele/internet children and young people see it and rightfully say 'why should we follow the law when the people that made them don't?' Tories are the party for the family and the rule of law...Rhubarb.

Sue Gray: why do we fetishise older women in positions of authority?Her name has spawned thousands of memes, but would society be so patronising if a man was in charge of the Downing Street partygate investigation, asks Claire Cohen? Apart from BrokenBarnet

We don’t need Sue Gray’s report to tell us that Britain is run by a liar | Jonathan FreedlandThe Met police delay of the partygate report will only deepen the public feeling that those in authority cannot be trusted, says Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland So why are people asking for it? Dangerous times TeaJunkie1 If Britain is run by a liar, who is responsible for The Guardian's disgusting efforts to get that liar elected in 2019?🤨🤮

Covid news live: Johnson vows to fight on despite lockdown party outrage; Moderna begins trial of Omicron-specific booster shotBritish PM braces for “partygate” report as England scraps indoor mask requirements and vaccine passports; Moderna follows Pfizer in launching trial to target Omicron Moderna may be starting to test an Omicron vaccine but BioNTech went into production earlier this month. Keep up.

On Tuesday, it was reported that Sue Gray’s report into the alleged Covid rule-breaking parties in Downing Street was to be published imminently. The 'partygate' report was expected to be released as soon as Wednesday, but remains in limbo as legal checks delay its publication. Telegraph readers looked ahead to what the report's findings could ultimately mean for Boris Johnson’s premiership. Elsewhere, the crisis in Ukraine was a big topic of conversation this week, as the dispute with Russia continued to heighten. Our readers focused the discussion on the West’s involvement in the crisis, as Boris Johnson confirmed on Tuesday that the UK would contribute to Nato deployments in the event of a Russian invasion. Read on to find out what our readers had to say about these stories and the week's biggest talking points. Get‌ ‌involved‌ ‌in‌ ‌future‌ ‌round-ups‌ ‌by‌ ‌joining‌ ‌the‌ ‌Telegraph‌ ‌Community‌ ‌Facebook‌ ‌group.‌ This could be the moment the establishment finally takes down Boris Johnson Camilla Tominey assessed the 'partygate' scandal so far and concluded that aspects of the situation, such as Ms Gray’s desire to have the report published in full, suggest that there is only so much power the most powerful man in the country can wield. Our readers expressed their disappointment over the scandal and discussed whether Boris Johnson could and should survive 'partygate'. 'We need to find another leader' @Gwyn Jones: "I was a big supporter of Boris Johnson; that changed when it became apparent that he had lied to Parliament and the people, who took him at his word and trusted him with their votes. "'Partygate' was the catalyst that exposed the true Mr Johnson, a man who thinks rules and laws are for other people. When one’s integrity is lost, trust is lost. We need to find another leader, so who is going to stand up to the plate?" 'Good judgement at the top looks severely lacking' @Adam Smith: "There's much mediocrity in Westminster. One would hope for good judgement at the top, but that looks severely lacking. It seems evident that there is a lot of sweating over this impending report, and attempts to redact parts of it. The suggestion that the appointment of a new Prime Minister would require a general election for a mandate is absolute desperation." 'Boris Johnson should stay, for now' @Alex Thomson: "I would happily see Boris Johnson held to account for his handling of the Covid crisis and lockdowns. That won’t happen within the context of this current process. The people manoeuvring to bring him down are up to their necks in the devastation that lockdowns have caused and would probably happily resume them tomorrow. "Boris Johnson should stay, for now. It is up to the public to announce his time is up, not political enemies who would have happily overturned the 2016 Brexit vote (in which I voted to remain) and the 2019 General Election result. "If Boris Johnson does go down for lockdown breaches then every single MP, civil servant, public health official, clinician and journalist who did likewise should also lose their jobs." Ukraine exposes just how weak the humiliated West has become In summarising the stances taken by Western countries in the handling of the Ukraine crisis, our columnist Sherelle Jacobs believes that the US and Europe risk tipping into a death spiral of humiliation and decline. Our readers took to the comments section to voice what they think has made the West so weak. 'Democracy is worth fighting for - but I don’t know anywhere that has one' @Ima Claret: "I do think that liberal democracy is worth fighting for but I don't know anywhere that has one. Why America is always held up as a shining example of a perfect state is beyond me - you have to be a billionaire to be President, there isn't universal suffrage and the separation of powers is non-existent. "As with the UK, the system is ruled by the increasingly mega rich at the expense of a stable, hard working middle and working class. Crime and the criminal classes are flourishing. As for 'freedoms', Covid has shown how easy it is for 'democracies' to take these away for years without any appeal by its own citizens, most of whom acquiesce weakly. "Here in Western Australia the state government has announced an extension of draconian rules which prevent its own citizens returning to their homes, not just from abroad but from other areas of Australia. This has now been going on for two years and counting, separating families and causing immense hardship." 'The West can do nothing more than make empty threats' @Jon Burton: "It's been on the cards for a long time and it looks increasingly as if Vladimir Putin will march into another of his neighbouring countries and take what he wants. Sadly, the West can only look on, but it will most likely do nothing more than make a lot of empty threats and utter a lot of sanctimonious platitudes. "That won't worry Russia one iota - whilst the West is busy wallowing in self-recrimination, wokeness, saving the planet, trying to control nature and all the other nonsense that only the decadent and smug thinks important, Russia has ambitions and it will simply march on, unopposed. "Countries that no longer care about affairs beyond their own borders will eventually go into decline and lose their influence and purpose. The cards have been on the table for a long time." 'Outsourcing industrial activity was a huge error' @Mavis Giggleswade: "Outsourcing industrial activity to China and other Asian nations because of their lower labour costs was a huge error. It offset our carbon emissions and salved out guilty imperial consciences. It also made China rich, powerful and able to bully the rest of the world. "Our national organisations are staffed by apologists for something, anything and everything. Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping watch on, open mouthed and incredulous." Our Moscow correspondent, Nataliya Vasilyeva, and senior foreign correspondent, Roland Oliphant, answer your questions on the Ukraine crisis, here. All Covid tests for fully-vaccinated travellers ditched Boris Johnson confirmed that holidaymakers who are fully vaccinated will no longer have to take any Covid tests for travel abroad. Our readers agreed in believing that this is a positive step in the right direction, but some were still weary of how this could affect the spread of the virus. 'All the what ifs completely spoil the idea' @Victoria Louise: "I don’t want to go abroad yet. Most politicians are still too volatile and the rules are changing too much and too often. What a nightmare if one of your group tests positive before or during your trip. What a nightmare if the rules change between booking and going away. What a nightmare if there’s an outbreak at your destination shortly before or during your stay. All the what ifs completely spoil the idea. "I am starting to look at where to go in a few years time. Anywhere crazy like Australia, Canada and most of Europe are off the cards. But Mexico, Croatia and Cape Verde are looking promising at the moment."' 'The only thing that had an iota of sense were the tests' @Barry Martin Langley: "This is ridiculous logic. You can still spread Covid jabbed or unjabbed. The only thing that had an iota of sense were the tests. Totally and utterly nonsensical thinking. It is following the same pattern of stupid decision-making throughout this pandemic." 'A move in the right direction' @Suzanne Kuhn: "A move in the right direction but, as usual, no detail to help travel agents field the volume of calls as to what defines 'vaccinated'. Never was so much harm done to outbound and inbound travel for so little." American liberal elites are waking up to the benefits of Brexit Nigel Gardiner highlighted this week that previous US Brexit opponents, such as the Washington Post and New York Times, are now seeing the positives of Britain's exit from the EU, especially during the current Ukraine crisis. Telegraph readers discuss their thoughts on Britain’s stance "as a pillar of freedom in Europe". 'Britain is freer now to make significant contributions to international affairs' @ Paul Green: "It is no coincidence that Britain is freer now to make significant contributions to international affairs. That always was one of the main points of Brexit. Leavers did not want our foreign policy to be submerged in the feeble, negative, self absorbed policies of the EU. Brexit was never only about GDP." 'The EU’s silence over the Ukraine crisis is deafening' @Philippa Squeak: "Just confirms the US has no idea about politics inside or outside the US. "The EU’s silence over the Ukraine crisis is deafening, from Germany and France in particular. We ignored Barack Obama’s meddling just before the referendum and Joe Biden's dislike of the UK is completely misguided. "The best thing this country has done is leave the EU, and that is what Remainers still can’t accept." 'Brexiteers are proud of our country and our globalist approach' @Moirelyn Jewula: "No one knows better than us how one incursion into a foreign country leads to more and more countries being overtaken. Again history plays its vital role in understanding what has happened in the past has the potential to be repeated. "The EU’s approach of 'let sleeping dogs lie', pretending that nothing is going to happen and anyway if it does, it’s not our problem, echoes the mantra of see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. Fortunately, we have such excellent Intelligence Services that we understand how Vladimir Putin’s mind works. "Brexiteers are proud of our country and our globalist approach, but they desired to be rid of the EU’s shackles." There will be no great rush back to the office – commuting is just too miserable With many office workers returning to their desks this week, Lucy Burton argued that commuting is just too miserable with overpriced, overcrowded trains and high omicron cases. Telegraph readers took to the comments to share whether they will be returning to the office or not. 'Commuting puts a nice barrier between home and work' @Fred Smith: "Commuting can be a great way to add incidental exercise and socialising to your day. It is also time to think and/or do something a bit different like read a book. My commute is a mixture of walking and a short train journey. It has never felt like a waste of time and puts a nice barrier between home and work. I’m looking forward to going back to it." 'Most people live outside London and get in their cars to commute' @Ollie Versarmy: "This seems to be an entirely train-orientated article, aimed at the London-centric commuter. Millions of people do not live or work in London or another big city. Most live outside London and get in their cars to commute 5, 10 or 20 miles each way to their office. Public transport is either unavailable or so slow and distant from their start or end points that it is irrelevant. Remote working for these commuters is a benefit in so many ways, both to the employee and the employer. "For those that care about such things, just think of the 'carbon footprint' of commuting by road. The Government will keep pushing the benefits of public transport, while leaving most of the population no choice but to use their cars." 'Working from home has enabled me to get my head down' @Susan Slater: "After a huge investment in IT and equipment to enable staff to work from home, few employers are going to demand all staff return to the office full time. As for those who consider home workers lazy, I have found my personal output far greater while working from home by being able to get my head down without all the interruptions and chit-chat of the office." Find out what current stories are getting our readers talking by visiting the Telegraph Community Hub Now it's your turn: what stories from the week got you talking? Let us know in the comments section below