Not ready to stop working from home? Top tips to beat office anxiety

76% of office workers do not wish to return to the office full-time.

1/19/2022 4:20:00 PM

With the government announcing the end of WFH guidance, it's time for many to go back to the office - but many are understandably anxious about the prospect.

76% of office workers do not wish to return to the office full-time.

, and an inability to separate work and leisure – which is having an impact on mental health.Returning to the office may have some benefits – not least the increased human contact and levels of interaction. Also, many people won’t have a choice in the matter. If the bosses say you have to go back, you have to go back.

So, what can you do if you’re feeling particularly anxious about returning to the office?Employee wellbeing experts, Oak Engage and behavioural psychologist at Durham University, Dr Mario Weick, have shared their top tips on beating that return to work anxiety, and above all improving happiness as the world starts to open up again.

Read more: Metro »

Politics live: Ministers prepare for release of 'stomach churning' Sue Gray report after end of police's partygate investigation

Politics Hub brings you the latest political news, insight and analysis from the Sky News team in Westminster. Boris Johnson is waiting for the publication of the Sue Gray report after the police investigation into partygate concluded. Read more >>

No way… why work from an office? To line up the Tory real state office owners?

Pilot gives top tips to overcome fear of flying in viral TikTokHarrison Murray’s TikTok videos get hundreds of thousands of views

Save £40 a year by switching off electronics - top energy-guzzling appliances in UK namedENERGY experts have shared how Britons can save £40 a year by switching off their electronics which are normally on standby. The top energy-guzzling appliances for hiking energy bills have also been named.

‘Impacts your breathing’: ‘Top tips’ for avoiding mould in homes when doing laundry insideA CLEANING expert has shared 'top tips' for how to avoid mould growth in homes when doing laundry indoors. The expert explained how the damp can impact 'your breathing'.

The biggest makeup trends for 2022, according to top makeup artistsJumpstart on the ones to watch.

Tuesday morning UK news briefing: Today's top headlines from The TelegraphYour 5am headlines from The Telegraph's news team

'Extremely rude': Top restaurant hits back at woman's one-star reviewA RESTAURANT manager hit back at a woman who whinged she was charged a £60 no-show fee after failing to turn up for her booking.

much longer hours , and an inability to separate work and leisure – which is having an impact on mental health. Returning to the office may have some benefits – not least the increased human contact and levels of interaction. Also, many people won’t have a choice in the matter. If the bosses say you have to go back, you have to go back. So, what can you do if you’re feeling particularly anxious about returning to the office? Employee wellbeing experts, Oak Engage and behavioural psychologist at Durham University, Dr Mario Weick, have shared their top tips on beating that return to work anxiety, and above all improving happiness as the world starts to open up again. Know what support is available to you It’s important to know what policies and procedures are in place at your company and your rights to working during the pandemic and beyond. ‘People should familiarise themselves with the latest health and safety measures put in place during the pandemic,’ says Mario. ‘Knowing what exactly is happening can increase one’s sense of control, which in turn reduces anxiety.’ Routine, routine, routine The pandemic has meant that everyone isn’t used to their normal routine, including work schedules and sleep patterns. So, make sure you get back into the swing of things and give yourself time to adapt. Mario comments: ‘Routines are powerful devices that help us stay on track. Routines can boost happiness and wellbeing because they make it easier to achieve our goals. During the pandemic, many of us found it difficult to maintain a healthy sleep routine. Disturbances of the circadian rhythm often go hand in hand with feeling down or anxious. ‘Re-establishing our day and night routines can be a way to reset our biological body clock and return to our pre-pandemic self.’ Be kind to yourself and others Be kind to your mind and body. Exercise is key for tackling stress and even going for a 15 minute walk can reduce anxiety. But remember to take it easy and don’t put too many expectations on yourself and your exercise routine. ‘Self-compassion is an antidote to anxiety and depression,’ adds Mario. ‘Self-compassion implies being less self-critical and more kind and understanding toward oneself. ‘People who are self-compassionate reach out to others when they are feeling down or are having a hard time. ‘Taking a moment to reflect and label one’s thoughts as “useful” or “not useful” before letting them go can be a way to beat self-criticism.’ On exercising, Mario adds: ‘There is ample evidence that physical activity boosts wellbeing. Now is a great time to enjoy the outdoors and perhaps explore ways to commute to work that involve cycling or walking.’ Focus on the positives ‘It can also help to focus on the benefits of going back to work,’ says Mario. ‘For example, the workplace can provide an opportunity to connect with other people. Being physically present may help others who have struggled with isolation during the pandemic. ‘One thing that the pandemic has taught us is the pleasure of simple things such as seeing friends or being outside and enjoying nature. Perhaps the pandemic has also given us new perspectives on work that will ultimately benefit our work/life balance.’ If you feel you need more support, ask your GP or another health professional for support. There are also some charities that can offer help and advice including Mind and Samaritans. More: