Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker, Tv & Radio

Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker

Jodie Whittaker drops huge revelation about her Doctor Who future

‘That might be a massive exclusive that I’m not supposed to say!’

23.1.2020

Jodie Whittaker drops huge revelation about her Doctor Who future

‘That might be a massive exclusive that I’m not supposed to say!’

The 20 greatest TV theme songs of all time 1/20 20) The Wire (“Way Down in the Hole” by Tom Waits) (2002-2008) A rotating cast of musicians were tasked with covering Tom Waits’ formidable dirge “Way Down in the Hole” for The Wire’s theme, including Steve Earle and The Blind Boys of Alabama. No one beat Waits at his own game, though, the gravelly voiced king of the gutters used for the prolific drama’s second series. Regardless of who was singing, the message would remain the same: “When you walk through the garden / You gotta watch your back.” 2/20 19) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (“Unbreakable” by The Gregory Brothers and Mike Britt) (2015-2019) Having the YouTube-famous Gregory Brothers, responsible for viral hit “Bedroom Intruder”, remix a news report of the show’s protagonist being rescued from an underground cult for the theme song is unbelievably strange, but also brilliant. The warped, breakneck burst of bubblegum ridiculousness that it became is truly uncharted grounds, tearing down walls separating television, streaming services and video platforms in a very catchy fashion. Netflix 3/20 18) Twin Peaks (“Twin Peaks Theme” by Angelo Badalamenti) (1990-2017) That they reused this theme for the recent Twin Peaks revival, an uncompromising, phantasmagoric trip through the mind of David Lynch, is intentionally and deliciously jarring, and that’s only because Badalementi’s theme so perfectly embodied the kitschy, nostalgia-drenched warmth of the original Nineties series, a simpler time. With ominous shadows lurking just beneath the beautiful crescendos, though, maybe Twin Peaks was never what it seemed. 4/20 17) The Twilight Zone (“Main Title Theme” by Marius Constant) (1959-1964) The Twilight Zone, an anthology series that was light-years ahead of the curve, had a stellar soundtrack predating an impressive and abundant pantheon of great horror scores, spooking us way before we had Halloween or The Exorcist. It’s a bit of Frankenstein’s Monster, consisting of a number of promotional pieces haphazardly spliced together, but from the messy birth is a tense, ethereal and insanely influential hair-raiser. Getty 5/20 16) Toast of London (“Take My Hand” by Matt Berry) (2012- ) As sung by co-creator and lead actor Matt Berry, one of the most under-appreciated and multifaceted talents of the decade, “Take My Hand” is rousing and poignant. Toast of London, a gloriously abstract, untamed animal of a comedy, is often punctuated by unexpected bursts of Berry’s singing, though no other performance quite reaches the loveliness of this theme – an emotional anchor in a sea of weirdness. press image from Lis Clucas/Kuba Wieczorek/Channel 4 6/20 15) The Sopranos (“Woke Up This Morning (Chosen One Mix)” by Alabama 3) (1999-2007) Alabama 3, an alternative rock band from Brixton, provides the theme song to a show that consistently outdoes itself with its music choices (see also: the series’ final few minutes). “Woke Up This Morning (Chosen One Mix)” is greasy and sleazy and Tom Waits-ish, a swamp of ominous synths and guitar licks, dipping into the weirder and artsier tendencies that The Sopranos would often divulge in. HBO 7/20 14) The Simpsons (“The Simpsons Theme” by Danny Elfman) (1989- ) With each title sequence, The Simpsons continually finds news way for America’s favourite family to come together on their couch, although the soundtrack to these journeys remains an unchanging monument. Honestly, “The Simpsons Theme” has transcended iconic status and is essentially a holy text by this point; excluding it from this list would have been sacrilegious. Shout out to Lisa who always knocks her sax solo out of the park. 8/20 13) Postman Pat (“Postman Pat & His Black and White Cat” by Bryan Daly) (1981-2006) This sleepy little lullaby of a theme song recalls the sensation of first waking in the morning, enthused by the feeling that everything is okay in the world. Bryan Daly’s almost whispered vocals speak of a heart-warming, enviously simple life for our hero Pat and his black and white cat; “Pat feels he’s a really happy man.” It’s a doorway to a world that, no matter the age, you would be happy to settle into. Woodland Animations 9/20 12) The Office UK (“Handbags and Gladrags” arranged by Big George) (2001-2003) What Gervais and Merchant’s version of The Office does so well is to embrace the humanity of everyday life, at-times hilarious, at-times pathetic. “Handbags and Gladrags”, originally written by Mike D’Abo of Manfred Mann but repurposed here by Big George, is unashamedly sombre and hungover. It sounds like that contrasting look of persistence to achieve better things and resigned acceptance on the face of every Monday morning commuter. BBC 10/20 11) M*A*S*H (“Suicide is Painless” by Johnny Mandel) (1972-1983) The lyrics to “Suicide is Painless”, omitted from the television title sequence but so married to the melody that they hang over it like a ghost, are heart-wrenching. They draw out the tragic, underlying nature of M*A*S*H, a comedy at heart, with their absence only highlighting the repression of this sadness. It’s unique and unprecedented in the sense that, each time it plays, it forces you to reconsider what it is you are about to see. REX/TM & copyright 20th Century Fox. 11/20 10) Knight Rider (“Knight Rider Theme” by Stu Phillips and Glen A. Larson) (1982-1986) The “Knight Rider Theme”, composed of pulsating, tensile synths and ticking programmed drums, is a very Eighties, Blade Runner-esque prediction of what the future would sound like: apocalyptic, sleek and synthetic. A bit like KITT itself, it’s nowhere near being timeless in that sense, but it’s undoubtedly cool even as a product of its time. REX FEATURES 12/20 9) It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia (“Temptation Sensation” by Heinz Kiessling) (2005- ) The It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia title sequence is all about ingenious contrasts. The episode titles often hilariously contradict the prior few minutes (see: “I’m gonna save my Dad!” into “Mac Kills His Dad), the shots of nighttime Philadelphia prove it’s not actually “always sunny”, and, best of all, the theme song hints at a certain lusciousness and grace. This, of course, is never the case. That “Temptation Sensation” is public domain makes it even more perfect. 13/20 8) Happy Days (“Happy Days” by Pratt & McClain) (1974-1984) Faced with declining ratings, Happy Days doubled down on the feel-good factor and comedy aspects for the third series. This new theme song, replacing the equally recognisable “Rock Around the Clock”, follows suit, borrowing the same idea of making the most of the time we have but blowing it out to its most cheery, broad and archetypal potential. Paramount/REX 14/20 7) Friends (“I’ll Be There For You” by The Rembrandts) (1994-2004) The Rembrandts got it pretty spot on – no matter what you do to escape it, this song will always be there. A bit like an over-eager best friend, the track brings a certain comfort, a sense of normality and is boundlessly, almost annoyingly joyful. You can’t help but love it unconditionally. sky 15/20 6) The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (“Yo Home to Bel Air” by The Fresh Prince) (1990-1996) Never before has a backstory been so endlessly recitable. Pop maestro Quincy Jones collaborated with renowned 80s hip hop duo DJ Jazzy Jeff and the The Fresh Prince, who happened to be starring in the show, to create a genuine cultural touchstone in just 15 minutes. Much like his character, Will Smith makes everything he does look completely effortless, including writing a theme song for the ages. NBC Productions 16/20 5) Doctor Who (“Doctor Who Theme Music” by Ron Grainer) (1963- ) The fact that this theme still evokes the excitement of stepping into new worlds almost 60 years on is telling. Composed in the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Ron Grainer and Delia Derbyshire’s otherworldly masterpiece has let loose the imaginations (and nightmares) of children for decades, itself a small but sturdy vessel that transcends time and space. BBC 17/20 4) Dad’s Army (“Who Do You Think You Are Kidding, Mr Hitler?” by Bud Flanagan) (1968-1977) Distinctly unimposing and charming yet equipped with a biting sense of self-depreciation and an unmatched persistence, the theme for Dad’s Army perfectly captures British spirit. In fact, dismissing Hitler’s reign as a “little game” may be one of the most devastatingly British blows ever landed. Bud Flanagan, a vaudevillian comic in his own right, outdid himself. Rex Features 18/20 3) Curb Your Enthusiasm (“Frolic” by Luciano Michelini) (2000- ) Just beating out Seinfeld’s iconic slap bass is the hilariously cocksure clown march that soundtracks Larry David’s second masterpiece, Curb Your Enthusiasm. “There was something circus-y about it,” he once explained. “It tells the audience: don’t take this seriously.” It’s near-impossible to hear it without picturing a slow zoom into his helpless face, forever mocking his inability to understand a world that goes right over his bald, emblematic head. HBO 19/20 2) Cheers (“Where Everybody Knows Your Name” by Gary Portnoy) (1982-1993) The quintessential theme song, almost unanimously agreed upon as the greatest of all time. Gary Portnoy’s “Where Everybody Knows Your Name” is that warm rush you feel stepping in from the cold or, more aptly, a much-needed beer after a long day. A deep exhalation of a programme, Cheers was that sense of relief for so many people, and the theme couldn’t have captured or acknowledged that more perfectly. 20/20 1) Batman (“Batman Theme” by Neal Hefti) (1966-1968) From the giddy, opening horn flourish to the driving guitar, the chorus of “Batman”’s to the hits of brass choreographed to our hero punching out crooks, you’d be hard pressed to find a better-known superhero theme. Although the franchise would return to darker places, the unabashed campness here harks back to the innocence of watching cartoons on weekend mornings. 1/20 20) The Wire (“Way Down in the Hole” by Tom Waits) (2002-2008) A rotating cast of musicians were tasked with covering Tom Waits’ formidable dirge “Way Down in the Hole” for The Wire’s theme, including Steve Earle and The Blind Boys of Alabama. No one beat Waits at his own game, though, the gravelly voiced king of the gutters used for the prolific drama’s second series. Regardless of who was singing, the message would remain the same: “When you walk through the garden / You gotta watch your back.” 2/20 19) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (“Unbreakable” by The Gregory Brothers and Mike Britt) (2015-2019) Having the YouTube-famous Gregory Brothers, responsible for viral hit “Bedroom Intruder”, remix a news report of the show’s protagonist being rescued from an underground cult for the theme song is unbelievably strange, but also brilliant. The warped, breakneck burst of bubblegum ridiculousness that it became is truly uncharted grounds, tearing down walls separating television, streaming services and video platforms in a very catchy fashion. Netflix 3/20 18) Twin Peaks (“Twin Peaks Theme” by Angelo Badalamenti) (1990-2017) That they reused this theme for the recent Twin Peaks revival, an uncompromising, phantasmagoric trip through the mind of David Lynch, is intentionally and deliciously jarring, and that’s only because Badalementi’s theme so perfectly embodied the kitschy, nostalgia-drenched warmth of the original Nineties series, a simpler time. With ominous shadows lurking just beneath the beautiful crescendos, though, maybe Twin Peaks was never what it seemed. 4/20 17) The Twilight Zone (“Main Title Theme” by Marius Constant) (1959-1964) The Twilight Zone, an anthology series that was light-years ahead of the curve, had a stellar soundtrack predating an impressive and abundant pantheon of great horror scores, spooking us way before we had Halloween or The Exorcist. It’s a bit of Frankenstein’s Monster, consisting of a number of promotional pieces haphazardly spliced together, but from the messy birth is a tense, ethereal and insanely influential hair-raiser. Getty 5/20 16) Toast of London (“Take My Hand” by Matt Berry) (2012- ) As sung by co-creator and lead actor Matt Berry, one of the most under-appreciated and multifaceted talents of the decade, “Take My Hand” is rousing and poignant. Toast of London, a gloriously abstract, untamed animal of a comedy, is often punctuated by unexpected bursts of Berry’s singing, though no other performance quite reaches the loveliness of this theme – an emotional anchor in a sea of weirdness. press image from Lis Clucas/Kuba Wieczorek/Channel 4 6/20 15) The Sopranos (“Woke Up This Morning (Chosen One Mix)” by Alabama 3) (1999-2007) Alabama 3, an alternative rock band from Brixton, provides the theme song to a show that consistently outdoes itself with its music choices (see also: the series’ final few minutes). “Woke Up This Morning (Chosen One Mix)” is greasy and sleazy and Tom Waits-ish, a swamp of ominous synths and guitar licks, dipping into the weirder and artsier tendencies that The Sopranos would often divulge in. HBO 7/20 14) The Simpsons (“The Simpsons Theme” by Danny Elfman) (1989- ) With each title sequence, The Simpsons continually finds news way for America’s favourite family to come together on their couch, although the soundtrack to these journeys remains an unchanging monument. Honestly, “The Simpsons Theme” has transcended iconic status and is essentially a holy text by this point; excluding it from this list would have been sacrilegious. Shout out to Lisa who always knocks her sax solo out of the park. 8/20 13) Postman Pat (“Postman Pat & His Black and White Cat” by Bryan Daly) (1981-2006) This sleepy little lullaby of a theme song recalls the sensation of first waking in the morning, enthused by the feeling that everything is okay in the world. Bryan Daly’s almost whispered vocals speak of a heart-warming, enviously simple life for our hero Pat and his black and white cat; “Pat feels he’s a really happy man.” It’s a doorway to a world that, no matter the age, you would be happy to settle into. Woodland Animations 9/20 12) The Office UK (“Handbags and Gladrags” arranged by Big George) (2001-2003) What Gervais and Merchant’s version of The Office does so well is to embrace the humanity of everyday life, at-times hilarious, at-times pathetic. “Handbags and Gladrags”, originally written by Mike D’Abo of Manfred Mann but repurposed here by Big George, is unashamedly sombre and hungover. It sounds like that contrasting look of persistence to achieve better things and resigned acceptance on the face of every Monday morning commuter. BBC 10/20 11) M*A*S*H (“Suicide is Painless” by Johnny Mandel) (1972-1983) The lyrics to “Suicide is Painless”, omitted from the television title sequence but so married to the melody that they hang over it like a ghost, are heart-wrenching. They draw out the tragic, underlying nature of M*A*S*H, a comedy at heart, with their absence only highlighting the repression of this sadness. It’s unique and unprecedented in the sense that, each time it plays, it forces you to reconsider what it is you are about to see. REX/TM & copyright 20th Century Fox. 11/20 10) Knight Rider (“Knight Rider Theme” by Stu Phillips and Glen A. Larson) (1982-1986) The “Knight Rider Theme”, composed of pulsating, tensile synths and ticking programmed drums, is a very Eighties, Blade Runner-esque prediction of what the future would sound like: apocalyptic, sleek and synthetic. A bit like KITT itself, it’s nowhere near being timeless in that sense, but it’s undoubtedly cool even as a product of its time. REX FEATURES 12/20 9) It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia (“Temptation Sensation” by Heinz Kiessling) (2005- ) The It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia title sequence is all about ingenious contrasts. The episode titles often hilariously contradict the prior few minutes (see: “I’m gonna save my Dad!” into “Mac Kills His Dad), the shots of nighttime Philadelphia prove it’s not actually “always sunny”, and, best of all, the theme song hints at a certain lusciousness and grace. This, of course, is never the case. That “Temptation Sensation” is public domain makes it even more perfect. 13/20 8) Happy Days (“Happy Days” by Pratt & McClain) (1974-1984) Faced with declining ratings, Happy Days doubled down on the feel-good factor and comedy aspects for the third series. This new theme song, replacing the equally recognisable “Rock Around the Clock”, follows suit, borrowing the same idea of making the most of the time we have but blowing it out to its most cheery, broad and archetypal potential. Paramount/REX 14/20 7) Friends (“I’ll Be There For You” by The Rembrandts) (1994-2004) The Rembrandts got it pretty spot on – no matter what you do to escape it, this song will always be there. A bit like an over-eager best friend, the track brings a certain comfort, a sense of normality and is boundlessly, almost annoyingly joyful. You can’t help but love it unconditionally. sky 15/20 6) The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (“Yo Home to Bel Air” by The Fresh Prince) (1990-1996) Never before has a backstory been so endlessly recitable. Pop maestro Quincy Jones collaborated with renowned 80s hip hop duo DJ Jazzy Jeff and the The Fresh Prince, who happened to be starring in the show, to create a genuine cultural touchstone in just 15 minutes. Much like his character, Will Smith makes everything he does look completely effortless, including writing a theme song for the ages. NBC Productions 16/20 5) Doctor Who (“Doctor Who Theme Music” by Ron Grainer) (1963- ) The fact that this theme still evokes the excitement of stepping into new worlds almost 60 years on is telling. Composed in the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Ron Grainer and Delia Derbyshire’s otherworldly masterpiece has let loose the imaginations (and nightmares) of children for decades, itself a small but sturdy vessel that transcends time and space. BBC 17/20 4) Dad’s Army (“Who Do You Think You Are Kidding, Mr Hitler?” by Bud Flanagan) (1968-1977) Distinctly unimposing and charming yet equipped with a biting sense of self-depreciation and an unmatched persistence, the theme for Dad’s Army perfectly captures British spirit. In fact, dismissing Hitler’s reign as a “little game” may be one of the most devastatingly British blows ever landed. Bud Flanagan, a vaudevillian comic in his own right, outdid himself. Rex Features 18/20 3) Curb Your Enthusiasm (“Frolic” by Luciano Michelini) (2000- ) Just beating out Seinfeld’s iconic slap bass is the hilariously cocksure clown march that soundtracks Larry David’s second masterpiece, Curb Your Enthusiasm. “There was something circus-y about it,” he once explained. “It tells the audience: don’t take this seriously.” It’s near-impossible to hear it without picturing a slow zoom into his helpless face, forever mocking his inability to understand a world that goes right over his bald, emblematic head. HBO 19/20 2) Cheers (“Where Everybody Knows Your Name” by Gary Portnoy) (1982-1993) The quintessential theme song, almost unanimously agreed upon as the greatest of all time. Gary Portnoy’s “Where Everybody Knows Your Name” is that warm rush you feel stepping in from the cold or, more aptly, a much-needed beer after a long day. A deep exhalation of a programme, Cheers was that sense of relief for so many people, and the theme couldn’t have captured or acknowledged that more perfectly. 20/20 1) Batman (“Batman Theme” by Neal Hefti) (1966-1968) From the giddy, opening horn flourish to the driving guitar, the chorus of “Batman”’s to the hits of brass choreographed to our hero punching out crooks, you’d be hard pressed to find a better-known superhero theme. Although the franchise would return to darker places, the unabashed campness here harks back to the innocence of watching cartoons on weekend mornings. She added: “I absolutely adore [being in the show]. At some point, these shoes are going to be handed on, but it’s not yet. I’m clinging on tight.” Doctor Who continues Sundays on BBC One. More about Read more: The Independent

👍🏻 Next Dr Who to be transgender with gender fluidity.....name of show changed to Dr Who? Climate change garbage stories, the writers have killed the Doctor not Jodie Whittaker.. Whittaker’s portrayal of the Doctor has been praised by fans... Rotten Tomatoes Season Eleven - 24% Season Twelve - 14% (So far)

shes great, but the preachy stories lines especially that cringe worthy climate change speech, the writers have let her down and the companion actors, just cant act, is just awful. Get WOKE go broke! very good She's saying a transgender Dalek? It's the worst DoctorWho season ever rip and to delete user ratings on RottenTomatoes will not make it any better.

Nerds!

What happens when we're too old to be 'useful'?Can we afford to pay pensions, given the huge demographic challenge of our ageing population? Join the the House of Lords. We vote to leave the EU? We teach others what community services makes social cohesion work.

Victoria Derbyshire's Bafta-winning show to be axed in BBC cutsBroadcaster needs to make huge savings as it picks up tab for over-75s licence fee It was boring and stale, and a bit too Wokey Racism !!! Cut the licence fee as well then BBC 😡😡 great show that

Susie Dent: 'I didn't guess' Countdown star on Rachel Riley's 'surprise' baby revelationSUSIE DENT, who is a firm favourite on Countdown, has opened up about her co-star Rachel Riley after the mathematician recently gave birth to her first child last year. How old is this, she had her kid weeks ago

Nine dead and four missing as storm Gloria batters SpainHigh winds, heavy rain, snowfall and huge waves lash eastern regions Omg God help us OMG 😰

Brexit LIVE: Sorry Boris, this is on OUR terms! EU sends UK warning over trade talksTHE EU has warned Boris Johnson future trade talks will be on their terms as the trade bloc prepares to thrash out its future agreement with the UK. Of course it will be. Watch him bend and sell us short, just like he achieved with NI. The EU is going to have a difficult time getting a trade deal with the UK with that start. One of their biggest export markets is leaving. The UK economy is equal to 17 of their poorer states. They will be that much weaker. The UK is the worlds 4th largest importer of goods.

Your definitive guide to medical grade and cosmeceutical skincare (plus the difference between the two)To help to provide some level of clarity, we asked the experts to define what they mean by some of the commonly used terms, so you know what to look out for.



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