‘I owe it to the kids’: coin found by detectorist dad sold for £648,000

‘I owe it to the kids’: coin found by detectorist dad sold for £648,000

Devon, Archaeology

1/24/2022 7:46:00 PM

‘I owe it to the kids’: coin found by detectorist dad sold for £648,000

Devon family makes a fortune from 13th-century gold coin discovered thanks to return to an old hobby

Michael Leigh-Mallory, 52, found the Henry III gold penny buried 10cm deep on farmland in the Devon village of Hemyock shortly after taking up his old hobby again. Not realising what it was, he posted a picture of the coin on social media, where it was spotted by the

He will split the proceeds of the find with the landowner and plans to use his windfall to help fund the future education of his children, history-loving 13-year-old Emily, who has ambitions of studying archaeology at university, and Harry, 10.“It is quite surreal really,” he said. “I’m just a normal guy who lives in

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I met Michael yesterday by chance when he visited The Tower with his family. What a fantastic story and real nice guy that deserves this amazing luck. He told me farmers are queuing up to offer him to search in their fields….I bet they are! You owe it to the tax collector too! I know we all probably might have heard about Bitcoin but don't know how it works, I tried it in a week ago by a man who recommended me to Dpurplewomanfx on Twitter she guides me through and i made a return of $10500 after a week of trading, connect with her Dpurplewomanfx

Gold coin found in Devon field fetches £540,000A detectorist stumbled on the 13th Century coin which is one of only eight known to exist. That’s mine that lost it

A Royal treasure but will you be coining it in with new 50p?A new set of 50p pieces will be put into circulation while Royal anniversary gold sovereigns will also be released in limited numbers. reality ... 2 yrs+ world reeling from devastation of covid. This.. shows exactly how out of touch ~archaic this whole monarchy thing is. Council of the European Union: STOP THE DEPORTATION OF POLITICAL REFUGEE OLEG ALIEV FROM FINLAND! OLEG ALIEV Oleg_Aliyev - Sign the Petition! via Change

A Royal treasure but will you be coining it in with new 50p?A new set of 50p pieces will be put into circulation while Royal anniversary gold sovereigns will also be released in limited numbers.

Why are old post boxes suddenly going missing?It is thought stolen letterboxes are being sold to unscrupulous collectors, possibly around the world. BBC, do your research! GR means it’s from George V! If it was George VI it would be GviR! People collect them🤗

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UK taxpayers to pay former Post Office workers up to £1bn compensationPost Office says it can’t afford bill owed to those wrongly convicted of theft due to defective Horizon IT system 👇🏼⚠️WATCH OUT!!⚠️👇🏼 👇🏼⚠️WATCH OUT!!!⚠️👇🏼

Mon 24 Jan 2022 16.01 GMT First published on Mon 24 Jan 2022 13.42 GMT A metal detectorist who gave up his hobby when he started a family, only to return to it when his children were old enough to nag him into taking them out detecting with him, has been rewarded with one of the most extraordinary finds – a fine example of England’s oldest gold coin, which has sold for a record-breaking £648,000 at auction. Michael Leigh-Mallory, 52, found the Henry III gold penny buried 10cm deep on farmland in the Devon village of Hemyock shortly after taking up his old hobby again. Not realising what it was, he posted a picture of the coin on social media, where it was spotted by the auctioneers Spink in London . He will split the proceeds of the find with the landowner and plans to use his windfall to help fund the future education of his children, history-loving 13-year-old Emily, who has ambitions of studying archaeology at university, and Harry, 10. On Monday, Leigh-Mallory made a pilgrimage to to pay his respects and offer thanks for his good fortune. “It is quite surreal really,” he said. “I’m just a normal guy who lives in with his family, so this really is a life-changing sum of money which will go towards their futures. Michael Leigh-Mallory and family. Photograph: BNPS “Emily and Harry are very much a part of this story. I used to be a keen metal detectorist but once I had a family the detector ended up getting buried in a cupboard. One day my wife said to me: ‘You realise you promised you’d take the kids metal detecting.’ So, I said: ‘Right, kids, we’re going detecting.’ We found an Elizabethan coin, which they were so excited by. It really ignited my passion so I invested in a new detector. “The day after it arrived I went out into this field. It was a bright, sunny day and within 15 minutes I found the coin. I knew it was gold but I had no idea how important it was.” Leigh-Mallory, a retired ecologist from Cullompton, added: “Both of my kids are very passionate about history. Emily has joined a local archaeology society and may study it at university, so the money could go towards that. “Had it not been for a promise I made to my children to go out searching, I do not believe this gold coin would ever have been found. The fine margin between discovery and loss makes this result all the more remarkable. I really owe it to them for having found the coin in the first place, as they were my inspiration to go out prospecting.” Describing the moment he found the treasure, Leigh-Mallory said: “My trowel exposed the coin. The sun was shining over my shoulder and it glistened. My heart jumped; I thought: ‘This is gold.’ As I picked it up the sun glinted on the king and my heart seemed to stop.” Leigh-Mallory said he would continue metal detecting, though did not expect to find anything as valuable again. “But it’s not about money. It’s about finding connections to our past.” The penny found by Leigh-Mallory was struck in about 1257 by the king’s goldsmith, William of Gloucester, with precious metal imported from north Africa. Featuring a portrait of the bearded and crowned Henry III on his throne, about 52,000 of the coins were minted. It became apparent they were financially unviable because the value of the coin was less than its weight in gold and almost all were melted down. Leigh-Mallory’s is only the eighth known example. Detail of the coin. Photograph: Spink & Son/BNPS The coin he found is thought to have belonged to John de Hyden, a former lord of the manor. Six months before the coin was introduced, De Hyden paid 120 grams of gold to the king to avoid jury service and public office. He later served in a military campaign in Wales, for which he may have received some of the gold pennies. Gregory Edmund, a senior numismatist at Spink, said: “Not only does this stand as the most valuable single coin find in British history, but also the most valuable medieval English coin ever sold at auction.” It achieved a hammer price of £540,000, with extra fees taking the final figure to £648,000. Edmund said: “It was bought by an anonymous private collector in the United Kingdom who intends to place the coin on loan to a public institution or museum. “The sale itself was very unusual because the buyer was there to bid in person. He loved that this fascinating story had unraveled from a chance discovery by a metal detector.” Topics