GOP state senator walks back comments on Nazi history in schools

1/11/2022 11:41:00 AM

GOP state senator walks back comments on Nazi history in schools

Us Education, Nazism

GOP state senator walks back comments on Nazi history in schools

Scott Baldwin faced backlash after his comments during a hearing on Senate Bill 167, which would ban ‘concepts that divide’ in schools

SB 167 was filed in recent weeks in response to the fierce debates that have emerged across Indiana Photograph: Michael Conroy/AP SB 167 was filed in recent weeks in response to the fierce debates that have emerged across Indiana Photograph: Michael Conroy/AP Tue 11 Jan 2022 08.Image caption, "Weird and stressful," says 18-year-old Dyfan Dyfan, 18, from Trevor, a student at Ysgol Dinas Bran, said: "It feels weird to be back with more restrictions.Tom White Image caption, Ralph White's wife Lynn suggested two miles a day might be more realistic than 10 A great-grandfather is marking 10 years of living with cancer with a 10-day walking challenge just weeks after having a major operation.: 1:01, 10 Jan 2022 A GIRL fled after being followed by two men in a white van in an alleged attempted “abduction”.

00 GMT Last modified on Tue 11 Jan 2022 08.03 GMT An Indiana state senator has backtracked on his remarks that teachers must be impartial when discussing nazism in classrooms after he sparked widespread backlash. "It's quite stressful - [we] didn't sit exams last year or the year before - so not only is there the stress of preparing for them but the stress of thinking, 'Am I ready to sit down in a room for two hours and just get on with it?' I've not been in that environment ever in my life. During a state senate committee hearing last week about Senate Bill 167, a proposed bill that would ban “concepts that divide” , Republican Senator Scott Baldwin, who co-wrote the bill, said teachers should remain unprejudiced when teaching lessons about fascism and nazism. Mr White, from Walney Island, Barrow-in-Furness, said he felt "so lucky to be alive". “Marxism, nazism, fascism … I have no problem with the education system providing instruction on the existence of those ‘isms’,” Baldwin said, adding, “I believe we’ve gone too far when we take a position … We need to be impartial." She said Covid had flipped her life upside down.” He went on to say that teachers should “just provide the facts” and that he is “not sure it’s right for us to determine how that child should think and that’s where I’m trying to provide the guardrails”. “Can people please keep their eyes open.

Read more Baldwin has since walked back on his remarks." Mr Hatch admitted it was that uncertainty that poses the biggest challenge to schools. Image source, Image caption, Ralph White said he wanted to spend another 10 years with his family He had originally suggested to his wife he could walk 10 miles a day to reflect his 10 years living with cancer and the 10 days since being discharged. In an email to the Indianapolis Star last Thursday, he said that his intention with the bill was to make sure teachers are being impartial when discussing and teaching “legitimate political groups”. “When I was drafting this bill, my intent with regard to ‘political affiliation’ was to cover political parties within the legal American political system,” Baldwin said . "The difficulty in planning for this term has been the uncertainty - whether we're planning for a full lockdown, for blended learning, knowing how many staff we've got in but also the amount of restrictions we're going to have to put in place. “In my comments during committee, I was thinking more about the big picture and trying to say that we should not tell kids what to think about politics. "This is my second major cancer and you look and you see kids of five, six, seven, eight who aren't gonna live for another couple of years because of it," he said.” He went on to denounce the aforementioned ideologies, saying, “nazism, Marxism and fascism are a stain on our world history and should be regarded as such, and I failed to adequately articulate that in my comments during the meeting." Image caption, Uncertainty and disruption has affected pupils and staff, says head teacher Mark Hatch However the restrictions have had an impact on the pupils' education, he says.

I believe that kids should learn about these horrible events in history so that we don’t experience them again in humanity.” SB 167 was filed in recent weeks in response to the fierce debates that have emerged across Indiana and the rest of the country in the past year regarding the ways schools should teach children about racism, history and other subject matters. "Their education has been disrupted through being in the same classroom, having supply teachers, having lockdowns, blended learning," he said. "I feel very lucky that I can still carry on with a fairly normal life and I haven't got to worry about looking for a toilet," he joked. The bill prohibits kindergarten through 12th grade schools from teaching students that “any sex, race, ethnicity, religion, color, national origin, or political affiliation” is inherently superior, inferior, racist, sexist, oppressive. Teachers would also be prohibited from making individuals feel “discomfort, guilt, anguish, responsibility or any other form of psychological distress” when it comes to meritocracy and the notion that it was created by one group to oppress another." Schools across Wales were given two planning days at the start of term with most children in south Wales back in class on Thursday. The bill also prohibits teachers and curriculums from teaching that Indiana and the United States was founded as a racist or sexist state or nation.

The midwest chapter of the Anti-Defamation League has criticized Baldwin’s apology, arguing that it “doesn’t change the deep harms of using ‘impartiality’ or ‘neutrality’ as tools to sanitize history”. Pupils in Ceredigion and Powys were taught online on Friday but both councils said all schools were now open for onsite teaching. “This is part of the continued efforts by some to try and rewrite history and characterize extremism, racism, and genocide as somehow legitimate That is dangerous and despicable. It should be categorically, universally, and loudly rejected,” the organization added. Only 1. The incident comes less than three months after a north Texas school official that classrooms with books on Holocaust must offer “opposing” viewpoints. Topics . In Denbighshire, years 7 to 9 in St Brigid's School, Denbigh, will be learning online until Friday, with other year groups going in as usual.

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SB 167 was filed in recent weeks in response to the fierce debates that have emerged across Indiana Photograph: Michael Conroy/AP SB 167 was filed in recent weeks in response to the fierce debates that have emerged across Indiana Photograph: Michael Conroy/AP Tue 11 Jan 2022 08.Image caption, "Weird and stressful," says 18-year-old Dyfan Dyfan, 18, from Trevor, a student at Ysgol Dinas Bran, said: "It feels weird to be back with more restrictions.Tom White Image caption, Ralph White's wife Lynn suggested two miles a day might be more realistic than 10 A great-grandfather is marking 10 years of living with cancer with a 10-day walking challenge just weeks after having a major operation.: 1:01, 10 Jan 2022 A GIRL fled after being followed by two men in a white van in an alleged attempted “abduction”.

00 GMT Last modified on Tue 11 Jan 2022 08.03 GMT An Indiana state senator has backtracked on his remarks that teachers must be impartial when discussing nazism in classrooms after he sparked widespread backlash. "It's quite stressful - [we] didn't sit exams last year or the year before - so not only is there the stress of preparing for them but the stress of thinking, 'Am I ready to sit down in a room for two hours and just get on with it?' I've not been in that environment ever in my life. During a state senate committee hearing last week about Senate Bill 167, a proposed bill that would ban “concepts that divide” , Republican Senator Scott Baldwin, who co-wrote the bill, said teachers should remain unprejudiced when teaching lessons about fascism and nazism. Mr White, from Walney Island, Barrow-in-Furness, said he felt "so lucky to be alive". “Marxism, nazism, fascism … I have no problem with the education system providing instruction on the existence of those ‘isms’,” Baldwin said, adding, “I believe we’ve gone too far when we take a position … We need to be impartial." She said Covid had flipped her life upside down.” He went on to say that teachers should “just provide the facts” and that he is “not sure it’s right for us to determine how that child should think and that’s where I’m trying to provide the guardrails”. “Can people please keep their eyes open.

Read more Baldwin has since walked back on his remarks." Mr Hatch admitted it was that uncertainty that poses the biggest challenge to schools. Image source, Image caption, Ralph White said he wanted to spend another 10 years with his family He had originally suggested to his wife he could walk 10 miles a day to reflect his 10 years living with cancer and the 10 days since being discharged. In an email to the Indianapolis Star last Thursday, he said that his intention with the bill was to make sure teachers are being impartial when discussing and teaching “legitimate political groups”. “When I was drafting this bill, my intent with regard to ‘political affiliation’ was to cover political parties within the legal American political system,” Baldwin said . "The difficulty in planning for this term has been the uncertainty - whether we're planning for a full lockdown, for blended learning, knowing how many staff we've got in but also the amount of restrictions we're going to have to put in place. “In my comments during committee, I was thinking more about the big picture and trying to say that we should not tell kids what to think about politics. "This is my second major cancer and you look and you see kids of five, six, seven, eight who aren't gonna live for another couple of years because of it," he said.” He went on to denounce the aforementioned ideologies, saying, “nazism, Marxism and fascism are a stain on our world history and should be regarded as such, and I failed to adequately articulate that in my comments during the meeting." Image caption, Uncertainty and disruption has affected pupils and staff, says head teacher Mark Hatch However the restrictions have had an impact on the pupils' education, he says.

I believe that kids should learn about these horrible events in history so that we don’t experience them again in humanity.” SB 167 was filed in recent weeks in response to the fierce debates that have emerged across Indiana and the rest of the country in the past year regarding the ways schools should teach children about racism, history and other subject matters. "Their education has been disrupted through being in the same classroom, having supply teachers, having lockdowns, blended learning," he said. "I feel very lucky that I can still carry on with a fairly normal life and I haven't got to worry about looking for a toilet," he joked. The bill prohibits kindergarten through 12th grade schools from teaching students that “any sex, race, ethnicity, religion, color, national origin, or political affiliation” is inherently superior, inferior, racist, sexist, oppressive. Teachers would also be prohibited from making individuals feel “discomfort, guilt, anguish, responsibility or any other form of psychological distress” when it comes to meritocracy and the notion that it was created by one group to oppress another." Schools across Wales were given two planning days at the start of term with most children in south Wales back in class on Thursday. The bill also prohibits teachers and curriculums from teaching that Indiana and the United States was founded as a racist or sexist state or nation.

The midwest chapter of the Anti-Defamation League has criticized Baldwin’s apology, arguing that it “doesn’t change the deep harms of using ‘impartiality’ or ‘neutrality’ as tools to sanitize history”. Pupils in Ceredigion and Powys were taught online on Friday but both councils said all schools were now open for onsite teaching. “This is part of the continued efforts by some to try and rewrite history and characterize extremism, racism, and genocide as somehow legitimate That is dangerous and despicable. It should be categorically, universally, and loudly rejected,” the organization added. Only 1. The incident comes less than three months after a north Texas school official that classrooms with books on Holocaust must offer “opposing” viewpoints. Topics . In Denbighshire, years 7 to 9 in St Brigid's School, Denbigh, will be learning online until Friday, with other year groups going in as usual.