Exclusive: Intel Reveals Plans for Massive New Ohio Factory, Fighting the Chip Shortage Stateside

Exclusive: Intel reveals plans for massive new Ohio factory, fighting the chip shortage stateside

1/21/2022 6:03:00 AM

Exclusive: Intel reveals plans for massive new Ohio factory, fighting the chip shortage stateside

The semiconductor company has announced what will be the 'largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet' in New Albany, Ohio, fighting the chip shortage stateside.

to build a semiconductor factory, also in Arizona. Samsung is investing $17 billion in a chip plant in Texas.Of course, some of the urgency of having more chip manufacturers in the U.S. is purely political. Locating a chip factory in the United States doesn’t necessarily insure against further supply chain disruptions; Intel’s chips will still be sent to Asia for assembly, packaging, and testing. Chips cross borders dozens of times before they make their way to consumers in phones, computers, and cars, said Dan Hutcheson, vice chair at TechInsights, which follows the semiconductor industry. Three-quarters of the world’s semiconductor manufacturing capability is within the flight path of the Chinese Air Force, Hutcheson said, which could be problematic in an era of growing geopolitical tensions.

Read more: TIME »

Texas school shooting live: Official admits police made mistakes as questions over officers' actions grow and extraordinary survival stories emerge

Texas' public safety chief holds a news conference after a mass shooting at a primary school in which 19 children and two teachers were killed. The attack by Salvador Ramos happened at Robb Elementary School in the city of Uvalde, which is around 80 miles west of San Antonio. Read more >>

chamath this is good news right? Hi, I am a structural engineer from Iran who have many ideas. I have summarized some of my ideas on my twitter(I suggest look at the idea of generating electricity by gravity). I want to work with companies and investors. Do you want to cooperate? Go Columbus Ohio! God Bless Cape Canaveral USA 🚀 Cape Florida ... 🇺🇲 ❤❤❤ VotingRightsAct USHistory

God Bless Rocket City USA 🚀 Huntsville Alabama ... 🇺🇲 ❤❤❤ VotingRightsAct USHistory God Bless Kitty Hawk USA 🦅 WrightBrothers North Carolina ... 🇺🇲 ❤❤❤ VotingRightsAct USHistory 🇺🇲🇺🇲🇺🇲 God Bless Jefferson NH USA ThaddeusLow 🦅 New Hampshire... 🇺🇲 ❤❤❤ VotingRightsAct USHistory 🇺🇲🇺🇲🇺🇲

Laura Hamilton reveals 'BIG plans' after moving into new home following surprise split from husbandA Place in the Sun's Laura Hamilton has shown off her new Surrey home and revealed exciting renovation plans

New Amsterdam airs season 4 tragic character twistNew Amsterdam season 4 reveals tragic character twist in latest episode: NewAmsterdam

Motorists now face paying per MILE to drive in London under Sadiq Khan's planSADIQ Kahn has been accused of targeting motorists in the capital again after plotting to charge them by the mile. The Mayor of London wants to force drivers who use petrol and diesel cars to switc… London voted for this. You only have yourself to blame. If you didn't vote you can't whinge.

Dubai ruler plans luxury garden room overlooking loch in the HighlandsSheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum (pictured with his ex-wife in 2011) wanted to expand his Inverinate Estate by erecting the glass-fronted summer house. Foreign rulers own the best UK real estate ..... Princess Latifa and Princess Shamsa

Australia offers visa fee refund to lure international workers and students as Morrison defends handling of pandemicPrime minister tells backpackers and students to ‘come on down’ as critical workforce shortages bite So long as they are not coming to show up how ludicrous its covid rules are. What will be needed at the same time is some mechanism to ensure these people are informed of their rights as workers, and paid properly. The current Government will not do anything about this. Nice gesture but hopefully will not be exploited, treated fairly and with dignity. Mr. Morrison doesn’t have a good reputation for treating people well. My suggestion is to weigh all other options first. Australia is last on my list.

‘A lot of anxiety’: childcare centres and parents warn of trouble ahead as Covid spreadsEarly childhood educators are pleading for more financial support and rapid tests amid spiralling staff shortages I never thought of meeting a legit bitcoin trader after been scammed many times at my age but the heavens sent AmelieBtc1 guided me and help me make a living through bitcoin with my coinbase app, I recommend you to meet her now and also be a beneficiary of good work

driving the price of used cars up 24% over the course of a year, and slowing national economic growth. Supply chain bottlenecks have motivated big companies to start increasing capacity in the U.S.; Intel itself said last year it would spend $20 billion to build two major factories in Arizona, and in 2020, the global leader in chip manufacturing Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), to build a semiconductor factory, also in Arizona. Samsung is investing $17 billion in a chip plant in Texas. Read More: Apple Set to Cut iPhone Production Goals Due to Chip Crunch Of course, some of the urgency of having more chip manufacturers in the U.S. is purely political. Locating a chip factory in the United States doesn’t necessarily insure against further supply chain disruptions; Intel’s chips will still be sent to Asia for assembly, packaging, and testing. Chips cross borders dozens of times before they make their way to consumers in phones, computers, and cars, said Dan Hutcheson, vice chair at TechInsights, which follows the semiconductor industry. Three-quarters of the world’s semiconductor manufacturing capability is within the flight path of the Chinese Air Force, Hutcheson said, which could be problematic in an era of growing geopolitical tensions. Intel could bring some packaging, assembly, and testing back to the United States if the CHIPS for America Act is funded, Gelsinger said, which would be beneficial for national security. The sand used to make semiconductors comes from the U.S. South, after all, so it’s not inconceivable that the process of making some chips, from start to finish, could happen domestically. “My objective would be sand to product to services, all on American soil,” he said. So much chip manufacturing ended up in Asia because of the low cost of labor there, in addition to the incentives offered, he said. But now, with increasing automation in chip factories and potential government funding, Intel is able to reshore some of this manufacturing and still be cost-effective. Since there are subsidies for the taking, now is the time to build semiconductor fabs in the U.S., said Stacy Rasgon, senior analyst at Bernstein Research. Subsidies for U.S. manufacturing have bipartisan support, especially in the tech industry. Locating a factory in the political battleground of Ohio could help the legislation gain even more support; on Jan. 14, GOP members of the Ohio congressional delegation to fully fund the $52 billion CHIPS for America Act. What the factory means for Ohio Intel’s choice of New Albany for its new facility is a vote of confidence in the Midwest as a manufacturing hub after years of factories decamping from Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana to the U.S. South and overseas. There are 34% fewer manufacturing jobs in Ohio now than there were in 1991; the closure of plants like General Motors’ Lordstown Complex have left whole towns reeling. But some companies have started to move back to Ohio from the coasts. “I truly believe this is our time. This is our time in history,” Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine told TIME, wearing a hooded sweatshirt and sitting by his home fireplace. The pandemic has helped the state sell its low cost of living and suburban lifestyle, which is coming back into vogue after an era in which tech companies and their employees wanted to be in expensive, coastal cities. Last year, companies including Peloton, First Solar, and Amgen announced plans to establish factories in Ohio. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine learned that Intel had selected New Albany as the location for its manufacturing mega-site on Christmas Day. Warren Dillaway—The Star-Beacon/AP The changing nature of manufacturing has helped the state attract new factories. “It used to be assembly line work, now it’s tech work,” Ohio Lt. Gov. Jon Husted told TIME. “It’s a lot more enjoyable kind of manufacturing—clean, tech-oriented, higher-paying. These are the kinds of the manufacturing jobs that are part of the modern economy.” And the past and future of manufacturing in the state is already inextricably tied up in the semiconductor supply chain; last year, Ford cut the production schedule at its Ohio Assembly Plant because of chip shortages. Intel considered 38 different sites “in every major state you can imagine” before choosing New Albany in December, Keyvan Esfarjani, Intel’s senior vice president of manufacturing, supply chains and operations told TIME. DeWine said the state learned that it had won the site on Christmas Day. The state agreed to invest $1 billion in infrastructure improvements, including widening State Route 161, to support the factory and the nearby community. In advance of the Intel factory and other deals, the Ohio General Assembly also , allowing mega projects with more than $1 billion in investment to benefit from job creation tax credits for up to 30 years, rather than the previous 15. Read More: U.S. Taxpayers Bankrolled General Electric. Then It Moved Its Workforce Overseas Gelsinger has spoken of a new mega-fab as “a little city,” which requires a lot of space. The amount of available land in Ohio, in addition to a favorable regulatory environment, were factors in making the decision, Esfarjani told TIME. Although another location offered bigger incentives, Intel chose Ohio because it seemed like the best fit, he said; the company did not want to displace any residents, an increasingly important factor for companies since pushback against a proposed Amazon headquarters in New York City killed the deal. Ohio also seemed willing to move quickly to approve permits and plans, Esfarjani said. “We want to make sure that where we go, the community is going to be happy,” Esfarjani said. “There were states where we were going to go, where we got a sense that people were not going to be happy, so we ruled them out,” he said, though he would not specify which states. Places where potential problems around protected species or land ownership might cause problems were taken off the list. Intel was also drawn to Ohio because of the availability of talent to draw on from local colleges and universities. Making semiconductor chips is a completely different type of work than making cars; much of the work is done by engineers in “bunny suits”—protective clothing that ensures that no dust gets into the microchips. Over the last two years, 60% of Intel’s external hires have had a bachelor’s degree or higher. The company said it will spend $100 million over the next 10 years to establish the Intel Ohio Semiconductor Center for Innovation, a partnership with universities and community colleges to build semiconductor-specific curricula. Ohio State University, with its 10,000 person College of Engineering, will be one partner. In August of 2020, Ohio State named a new president, Kristina M. Johnson, who received bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in engineering from Stanford University and who established partnerships with tech companies like IBM while the head of the State University of New York. Ohio State is in the process of building an to establish a health and sciences research space near its West Campus and recently hired a female robotics professor from the Georgia Institute of Technology to be dean of the College of Engineering. Transforming a suburban town The Intel project, the first leading-edge semiconductor fab in the Midwest, will accelerate the transformation of a sleepy rural area outside of Columbus into a diverse city full of tech workers. In recent years, companies like Google, Facebook, and Amazon have established data centers in New Albany, a city of 12,000 residents. Much of New Albany today consists of a master-planned community created in the 1990s by Les Wexner, the founder of L Brands—best known for subsidiaries like Victoria Secret—and Ohio developer Jack Kessler. The two wanted to create the type of town that was attractive to companies while still offering an idyllic country lifestyle for residents. New Albany today features white picket fences, Georgian architecture, and walking trails: Drive through and you might mistake it for a Virginia horse farm. The choice of New Albany is a bet that after nearly two years of a global pandemic, Intel’s employees will embrace a suburban environment with reasonable home prices and good schools. (Zillow estimates the typical New Albany home is worth $516,752, about one-third the value of homes in Intel’s home base of Santa Clara, Calif.) The pandemic has hastened a move from urban locations to suburban places with more space. “It’s a place where a new college grad can come with a husband, or wife, or significant other, a kid, and they can build a life,” Esfarjani said. There is some potential for some pushback from New Albany residents who are already worried that development is fundamentally changing the nature of where they live. “Two years ago, there were cows, now there are houses,” said Andre Vatke, who has lived in New Albany since 1986, about the area around his home. When he moved in, New Albany was essentially a farm town; now it’s known as one of the wealthiest towns in Ohio. Insider America’s No. 1 suburb in 2015 because of the quality of its schools and public parks. Vatke has publicly objected to the tax abatements given to big tech data centers because the projects don’t create a lot of jobs. He consults with small businesses who are seeing costs go up locally but who aren’t offered the same tax incentives as the multinational tech companies, he said. Read More: Senate Overwhelmingly Passes $250 Billion Tech Investment Bill Aimed at Countering China Neighbors of Intel chip factories in other states have raised questions about the environmental impact of fabs, too. In Arizona, residents are also concerned about the amount of water fabs use—millions of gallons a day—in their drought-stricken state. And in Corrales, New Mexico, where Intel has had a factory for decades, residents have complained about air quality issues. “A lot of people have an impression that this is a clean industry—but the chemicals they are using are incredibly dangerous,” said Dennis O’Mara, a member of the Community Environmental Working Group, which advocates for improvements at the New Mexico facility. In the summer, O’Mara and his wife have been overwhelmed by a smell like burnt coffee; once, recently, his wife had difficulty breathing in the fumes. He says that because Intel is categorized as a “minor” source of emissions, creating less than 100 tons per year of pollutants, the company is allowed to hire its own monitoring companies who are not verified by an independent party. He helped create a group,