Ditching VMware over the Broadcom buy? Here are your options

6/28/2022 9:02:00 PM

What's your contingency plan?

Ditching VMware over the Broadcom buy? Here are your options

What's your contingency plan?

Then there's Oracle, which offers a suite of hypervisors for everything from desktop virtualization to datacenter-scale deployments.For enterprise use cases, Oracle's KVM-based virtualization is built around the company's Linux OS and can be used to run virtual machines or"hard provision" workloads with core or socket-based licensing models.

These deployments are managed via Oracle's Linux Virtualization Manager, which provides a centralized dashboard for deploying, managing, and monitoring clusters, hosts, and VMs.The combination boasts support for Oracle Linux, Red Hat, SUSE Linux, Ubuntu, Solaris, and Microsoft Windows.

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3.15:30 UTC Copy VMware today revealed details about Project Arctic, the vSphere-as-a-service offering it teased in late 2021, though it won't discuss pricing for another month.15:30 UTC Copy VMware today revealed details about Project Arctic, the vSphere-as-a-service offering it teased in late 2021, though it won't discuss pricing for another month.06:27 UTC Copy Hitachi has taken a modest step towards becoming a public cloud provider, with the launch of a VMware-powered cloud in Japan that The Register understands may not be its only such venture.

Oracle Then there's Oracle, which offers a suite of hypervisors for everything from desktop virtualization to datacenter-scale deployments. For enterprise use cases, Oracle's KVM-based virtualization is built around the company's Linux OS and can be used to run virtual machines or"hard provision" workloads with core or socket-based licensing models. Managing them all centrally is not easy. These deployments are managed via Oracle's Linux Virtualization Manager, which provides a centralized dashboard for deploying, managing, and monitoring clusters, hosts, and VMs. Enter , which run in the cloud and can control multiple on-premises instances of vSphere or VSAN. The combination boasts support for Oracle Linux, Red Hat, SUSE Linux, Ubuntu, Solaris, and Microsoft Windows. To make that possible, users will need to adopt the Cloud Gateway, which connects vSphere instances to a Cloud Console. 4. Buyers of such clouds know that sovereign cloud providers can't match hyperscalers for elasticity but, as they require surety that using any cloud won't expose them to exotic legal entanglements, are happy to get as much of the cloud experience as possible.

Microsoft For customers closely aligned with Microsoft's software ecosystem, Redmond offers a pair of ESXi and vSphere alternatives... For small businesses that just need to run a couple of virtual machines, there's Microsoft's venerable Hyper-V, which ships with Windows Server. Meanwhile, for enterprises managing large virtualization clusters, there's Microsoft Azure Stack. yet "The Cloud Console provides visibility and centralized management across all the connected vCenter environments, including vCenter lifecycle management, remediation of configuration drift, monitoring global inventory, alerts, and security posture," the folks at VMware told The Register "Customers can also provision VMs to any vSphere cluster from the Cloud Console. The platform is based on a combination of Hyper-V and the hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) tech used in Azure." If you'd rather work with vCenter without involving Cloud Console, that's entirely possible. Azure Stack essentially extends the public cloud provider's control system for virtualization, containerization, networking, and storage to customer's existing on-prem infrastructure. The services aren't VM-centric.

The tight integration with Azure may have benefits for customers looking to migrate workloads to the cloud or take advantage of the company's cloud-based services on prem. Time to containerize? Another question customers looking for VMware alternatives may want to consider is whether to take the opportunity to modernize their apps through containerization. vSphere+ and VSAN+ also make it possible to apply VMware auxiliary cloud services – for now the options are DR, ransomware protection, and lifecycle management – to on-prem vSphere and VSAN without having to change anything on local hosts. vSphere+ and VSAN+ also make it possible to apply VMware auxiliary cloud services – for now the options are DR, ransomware protection, and lifecycle management – to on-prem vSphere and VSAN without having to change anything on local hosts. This is by no means a trivial task, notes Chhabra. "I have my applications running on a hypervisor stack, but for me to even approach and run a Kubernetes or container platform, I will need to make changes to my application," he said. It's now updated quarterly in its cloudy incarnation and that's translated into updates including quite substantial features (at least the updates that aren't. Those are"massive efforts from an application development standpoint.

" And that assumes the end user even wants to modernize the application. There are many applications on which customers may still rely, but they have no interest in investing the resources to modernize them, Chhabra added. But for enterprises that have already prioritized application modernization, container migration may be worth considering. And when it comes to independent software vendor (ISV) workloads, many are already validated to run on Docker or in Kubernetes clusters. Before you make the switch Before committing to any new platform, customers should validate whether it meets their needs, something Chhabra notes is far from guaranteed.

"Don't resort to a knee-jerk reaction," he said."Make calculated decisions." This means taking stock of existing product and support contracts to get a better understanding of the organization's dependence — both perceived and real — on VMware. What's more, customers need to be mindful of ISV compatibility, or they may find that their workloads may not be supported even if they manage to get them running on a competing virtualization stack. "Not all ISVs will certify non-VMware stack at the same speed at which you want them," Chhabra said.

"Just because the customer wants to move off VMware doesn't mean the entire ISV ecosystem will move at your speed." For example, if a customer has deployed a SAP workload on VMware ESXi, and they now want to migrate to a competing hypervisor, they may have to wait for SAP to certify their software to run on that platform."You cannot outpace your ISV partners," he said. And even if a viable alternative is available, IT teams may need time to develop the skills necessary to implement and integrate a new virtualization stack into their workflow. ® Share .