Ancient Roman snacks found in Colosseum dig

11/25/2022 2:21:00 AM

Ancient Roman snacks found in Colosseum dig

Ancient Roman snacks found in Colosseum dig

The study of the sewers under Rome's landmark found traces of olives, nuts and other foods.

By Mattea BubaloBBC NewsSpectators at Rome's ancient gladiator arena, the Colosseum, may have enjoyed snacks of olives, fruit and nuts, archaeologists have found.Food fragments of figs, grapes, cherries, blackberries, walnuts and more have been unearthed at the site.

Archaeologists also found the bones of bears and big cats that were probably used in the arena's hunting games.The discoveries were made by archaeologists examining the 2,000-year-old landmark's sewers.Relics like these provide a snapshot into the "experience and habits of those who came to this place during the long days dedicated to the performances", said Alfonsina Russo, Director of the Colosseum Archaeological Park.

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the real question is, is it edible? Wolf's nipple chips, get 'em while they're hot, they're lovely. Meow Mix Roman style was my first thought. Thank you inside the Colosseum there are also more than than 350 species of plants that have grown spontaneously and that scientists are studying. And this is my artwork of the Colosseum, if I may show you, please

Get me some Jaguars earlobes. No Wrens livers - I'm watching my weight Guisseppe had forgotten his panini in ruins few months ago... Larks' tongues. Otters' noses. Ocelot spleens.

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The Colosseum is one of Italy's most popular tourist sites By Mattea Bubalo BBC News Spectators at Rome's ancient gladiator arena, the Colosseum, may have enjoyed snacks of olives, fruit and nuts, archaeologists have found.London , said: ‘For much of ancient Roman history, Roman mints produced coins featuring portraits of current emperors.BBC News Image caption, The face of Sponsian the first, who was purged from history by experts in the nineteenth century.A papyrus fragment in Israel, dating from the First Temple period (late seventh or early sixth century BCE) found in the Judean Desert caves (Photo: Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty) By November 24, 2022 12:27 pm The most famous collection of books the world has ever seen was the great library of Alexandria.

Food fragments of figs, grapes, cherries, blackberries, walnuts and more have been unearthed at the site. Archaeologists also found the bones of bears and big cats that were probably used in the arena's hunting games. ‘While the Transylvanian coins follow the general style of mid-third Century Roman coins, they diverge in certain stylistic characteristics and in how they were manufactured, leading many experts to dismiss them as forgeries created to sell to collectors. The discoveries were made by archaeologists examining the 2,000-year-old landmark's sewers. The coin bearing the name of Sponsian and his portrait was found more than 300 years ago in Transylvania, once a far-flung outpost of the Roman empire. Relics like these provide a snapshot into the "experience and habits of those who came to this place during the long days dedicated to the performances", said Alfonsina Russo, Director of the Colosseum Archaeological Park. ‘Additionally, in 1713, Sponsian was not yet known to be a name that had ever existed in ancient Rome. Researchers say bones from bears, lions and jaguars were probably left by animals that were forced to fight each other and gladiators for entertainment. Back then books came in cylindrical form – papyrus is a reed that grows around the Nile, and it was used to make sheets of writing material which were rolled up and stored in scrolls.

Smaller animal bones belonging to dogs were also found. They applied visible light microscopy, ultra-violet imaging, scanning electron microscopy, and reflection mode Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy to the four coins and, for comparison, two undoubtedly authentic Roman gold coins. Prof Paul Pearson University College London, who led the research, told BBC News that he was astonished by the discovery. A selection of fruit seeds, stones, & pits recovered from the drainage system of the Colosseum in .