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“It’s a very misunderstood condition.”

Pcos, Pcosawarenessmonth

9/24/2021 8:31:00 PM

Did you know that this can be a 'hidden' symptom of PCOS ? PCOS AwarenessMonth

“It’s a very misunderstood condition.”

You may also like“Black women with PCOS are being failed by doctors – and it’s causing a loss of trust in the NHS”Alex Williams, a registered associate nutritionist who specialises in PCOS management, believes that people with PCOS need more support to deal with the emotional toll of the condition on their lives.

“As the most common reproductive age endocrine (hormone) disorder, we require more high-quality research into its management rather than doctors only prescribing the hormonal birth control pill and/or weight loss,” she says.“Treatment must be individualised and may be best decided with help of a specialist,” agrees Dr Bajekal, while also stressing the importance of reliable, credible and evidence-based health resources, such as Verity, the NHS and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

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, where they’re less likely to be given effective painkillers as men. You may also like “Black women with PCOS are being failed by doctors – and it’s causing a loss of trust in the NHS” Alex Williams , a registered associate nutritionist who specialises in PCOS management, believes that people with PCOS need more support to deal with the emotional toll of the condition on their lives. “As the most common reproductive age endocrine (hormone) disorder, we require more high-quality research into its management rather than doctors only prescribing the hormonal birth control pill and/or weight loss,” she says. “Treatment must be individualised and may be best decided with help of a specialist,” agrees Dr Bajekal, while also stressing the importance of reliable, credible and evidence-based health resources, such as Verity, the NHS and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. You may also like Polycystic ovary syndrome and exercise: 7 yoga poses for soothing PCOS symptoms How can PCOS be managed effectively? PCOS is a chronic condition so, while there is no “cure”, health professionals state that making positive lifestyle changes can go a long way in managing PCOS and its symptoms in both the short and long term. “All national and international guidelines recommend lifestyle and behavioural changes as the first line of management for PCOS, even before medications,” explains Dr Bajekal. “Some people with PCOS will benefit from medication such as the oral or fertility treatment, alongside lifestyle changes. It’s best to weigh up all options with your health professional.” Before taking any advice or making medical decisions, be sure to always consult your GP. Sign up for the latest news and must-read features from Stylist, so you don't miss out on the conversation. Enter your email address