Will COVID-19 end the French 2-kiss bise on the cheeks forever?

7/8/2021 2:06:00 AM

Will COVID-19 end the French 2-kiss bise on the cheeks forever?

Will COVID-19 end the French 2-kiss bise on the cheeks forever?

Many are split over whether to go back to the way greetings used to be and question whether the bise was all that great to begin with.

“COVID-19 made us stop doing the bise,” said al-Hakkak, 23. “It’s a lot easier now. I don’t need to ask myself tons of questions about whether I should do it or not.”Related:“The pandemic made us realise that we had the choice to do the bise or not,” said Karine Boutin, a psychoanalyst based in the western French city of Poitiers. “The question to ask is whether the bise of tomorrow will be the same bise as yesterday, with the same intensity and the same spontaneity. We don’t know if this traumatic memory is here to stay.”

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LinkedIn Twice a year, Louise al-Hakkak would sit on her front porch in Burgundy, waiting for her sister Flora and dreading the moment of “la bise.(Aug 4).Read full article 5 August 2021, 12:31 pm · FILE PHOTO: SOMOS Community Care administers Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine at pop-up site in New York By Michael Erman (Reuters) - Moderna Inc said on Thursday its COVID-19 shot was about 93% effective through six months after the second dose, showing hardly any change from the 94% efficacy reported in its original clinical trial.LinkedIn SINGAPORE: Singapore will soon allow travellers from Taiwan to take a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test upon arrival and to go about their activities in Singapore if the PCR test result is negative.

” In this Franco-Iraqi family, only Flora enjoyed France’s traditional two-kiss greeting on the cheeks. For al-Hakkak and her father, “It was more a chore than anything else. The Biden administration has interagency working groups working"to have a new system ready for when we can reopen travel", the official said, adding it includes"a phased approach that over time will mean, with limited exceptions, that foreign nationals traveling to the United States (from all countries) need to be fully vaccinated".” But times have changed. During a second-quarter earnings call, Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel said that the company would not produce more than the 800 million to 1 billion doses of the vaccine that it has targeted this year. “COVID-19 made us stop doing the bise,” said al-Hakkak, 23. Numerous other countries have been added, most recently India in May. “It’s a lot easier now. If they test negative, they will be allowed to go about their activities in Singapore.

I don’t need to ask myself tons of questions about whether I should do it or not. Last month, Reuters reported that the White House was considering requiring foreign visitors to be vaccinated as part of discussions on how to relax travel restrictions.6% to around $403.” In France, the bise is a long-standing tradition for greeting loved ones, or even strangers, that was upended by the coronavirus. Throughout the pandemic, French authorities have urged people to avoid physical contact to prevent the virus from spreading. Related: Biden chides Republican governors who resist COVID-19 vaccine rules Some countries, including Canada and the United Kingdom, are relaxing or lifting restrictions for vaccinated Americans to travel. But now, with more than half of the French population at least partly vaccinated and most lockdown restrictions lifted, many are split over whether to go back to the way greetings used to be and questioning whether the bise was all that great to begin with. The Moderna data compares favorably to that released by Pfizer and BioNTech last week in which they said their vaccine's efficacy waned around 6% every two months, declining to around 84% six months after the second shot. Related: Is work weighing you down? Don't be afraid to take a 'sad day' for your mental health (Photo: iStock) “The pandemic made us realise that we had the choice to do the bise or not,” said Karine Boutin, a psychoanalyst based in the western French city of Poitiers. The administration must also answer other questions including what proof it would accept of vaccination and if the United States would accept vaccines that some countries are using but which have not yet been authorized by US regulators..

“The question to ask is whether the bise of tomorrow will be the same bise as yesterday, with the same intensity and the same spontaneity. We don’t know if this traumatic memory is here to stay. The White House interagency talks previously had focused on requiring vaccines for nearly all foreign visitors arriving by air. The comment comes as public health officials across the world debate whether additional doses are safe, effective and necessary even as they grapple with the fast-spreading Delta variant of the coronavirus.” The agreed-upon number of kisses varies across French regions: Sometimes, the standard is two, but in the southern city of Montpellier, it is three, and it is just one in the northwestern region of Brittany. There are even “maps of bises” to help newcomers understand this confusing geography. Currently, the only foreign travelers allowed to cross by land into the United States from Mexico and Canada are essential workers such as truck drivers or nurses. The bise has also become a political tool, symbolising the closeness of an elected official with his fellow citizens. Story continues It said neutralizing antibody levels following the boost approached those observed after the second shot.

Francois Hollande, the Socialist former president, liked to call himself “the president of kisses. Industry officials still think it will be at least weeks and potentially months before restrictions are lifted.” Related: Feeling off? Here are tips on how to get things done even when you don't feel up to it “Campaigning without being able to get close to people, it kind of kills the mood,” Rachida Dati, a conservative candidate in last year’s Paris mayoral race, said at the time. But when the pandemic gripped the nation, it instilled a fear that the bise could pose a threat. Trump did attempt to lift European countries from the restrictions in January but Biden reinstated the restrictions before they were dropped. The company, however, has not been able to keep pace with the much larger Pfizer, which expects to manufacture as many as 3 billion doses this year and 2021 sales https://www. In an awareness video it posted in September, the French government used ominous music to underscore the new risks of previously routine actions, including greeting a colleague in front of a coffee machine. “I rely on you to follow the instructions, and in particular these famous barrier gestures, against the virus,” President Emmanuel Macron said in a televised address in the early days of the pandemic. The restrictions have separated loved ones and prevented some people working in the United States from returning to home countries and others from coming for employment.

“This means greeting without kissing or shaking hands to not spread the virus.5 billion.” People began using new forms of greeting, such as the “elbow bump” or the “footshake” that trended on TikTok and inspired some French ministers to follow suit. The sources said at the time no decisions had been made. Not everyone has missed the bise. Half of the respondents to a survey published in March by IFOP, a polling institute, said that they would stop greeting loved ones with it in the future, and 78 per cent said that they would no longer use it to greet strangers..S. Adrien Beaujean, 26, said the greetings that have replaced the cheek kiss suit him just fine.

“The best alternative is a smile,” said Beaujean, who lives in the eastern city of Strasbourg. “There is nothing more beautiful than a smile.4 billion, slightly above expectations of $4.” But after months of being locked down and as people have been repeatedly urged to abide by social distancing, the lack of physical contact has worn some people down. “Humans are naturally suffering from so-called skin hunger,” said Gautier Jardon, who conducted the IFOP poll, finding that the proportion of people who still did the bise with strangers had shrunk far more than it did for family members, friends and colleagues. Greeting each other with a kiss means integrating personal space, said Boutin, the psychoanalyst. Moderna earned $2.

“With the prohibition of physical contact, it is as if we had completely annihilated what we were, as if we did not exist anymore,” she said. “We need human contact, if only to stay alive.” Related: We need to take self-care seriously: Our mental and physical health depend on it Disease outbreaks have halted kissing customs before.96 a share. In the mid-1300s, Europe was struck by the “Black Death,” a plague that killed 25 million to 30 million people, almost a third of its population. At the time, the kiss was not a systematic form of greeting, according to Alain Montandon, a philosopher, in his book Le Baiser.

But it did have significant sociopolitical importance. “It had the value of a contract or a pact,” Montandon said. As summer approached this year, and mask mandates were dropped, some grew restless with the lack of la bise – including, it seemed, Macron himself, who kissed two World War II veterans on the cheeks in June during a commemorative ceremony. (Macron was wearing a mask.) But Pauline Gardet, 24, is hoping COVID-19 will bring the bise era – and its many unwanted kisses – to an end.

“Typically, two days ago, a guy came very close to me, not leaving me any choice but to kiss him,” she said. “I found it very rude – the coronavirus is still there.” Valerie Camus, 47, a director of human resources living in the Paris region, said dropping the bise with her work colleagues did not really matter. “But I think it would be really sad if we were to abandon it,” she said, “at least in the family and friendship circles.” By Gaelle Fournier © The New York Times This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/31/world/europe/covid-france-bise.html .