SPF warns public of fake SMSes sent by scammers who pretend to be the police

Always verify the authenticity of the information.

17/1/2022 2:05:00 PM

SPF warns public of fake SMSes sent by scammers who pretend to be the police

Always verify the authenticity of the information.

Scammers message victim pretending to be SPFIn one case, the receiver of the SMS was the victim of a loan scam who had provided his personal particulars and bank account details for the application of loans.He was asked to transfer money to make payment for administrative or transfer fees, before a loan could be disbursed to him.

While waiting for his loan approval, he received a fake SMS with the header"SPF".The message indicated that he was under supposedly investigation for money laundering offences and was instructed to contact the investigation officer listed in the SMS for further information.

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Scam alert: Police warn of fake SMS with ‘SPF’ headerSINGAPORE — The Singapore Police Force (SPF) has warned the public to be wary of fake SMSes which appear as though the message comes from the police but, in fact, have been sent by scammers.

Scam alert: Police warn of fake SMS with ‘SPF’ headerSINGAPORE — The Singapore Police Force (SPF) has warned the public to be wary of fake SMSes which appear as though the message comes from the police but, in fact, have been sent by scammers.

Police raid 17 handphone shops in crackdown on SIM cards registered to fake usersThe SIM cards are sold to customers who want to remain anonymous, and could have been used for crimes. Too bad. Remove their license if they don't know or follow the law. why is it too bad? help to cut down on scamsters

Police raid 17 handphone shops in S'pore selling SIM cards allegedly registered using fake detailsThe fraudulent SIM cards are typically exploited by criminals who wish to remain anonymous to conduct illicit activities. Shit… no more burners to use for my XXX appointments… 😰

OCBC compensates more than 30 SMS scam victimsSINGAPORE - OCBC Bank said on Monday (Jan 17) that it has already been making goodwill payments to customers who lost funds from their bank accounts in a recent spate of SMS phishing scams. The bank said it has been doing so since Jan 8 and more than 30 customers have received them so far. 'The payouts to this group... Who are the “beneficiaries”? Let them get away scot-free? ZERO explanation from Head of Digital Business and Transformation? What about SGFinDEx? Conveniently expose depositors to all sort of risk and never said a word?

The Singapore Police Force (SPF) has put out an advisory to warn members of the public about fake SMSes where scammers spoof the SMS header. Scammers message victim pretending to be SPF In one case, the receiver of the SMS was the victim of a loan scam who had provided his personal particulars and bank account details for the application of loans. He was asked to transfer money to make payment for administrative or transfer fees, before a loan could be disbursed to him. While waiting for his loan approval, he received a fake SMS with the header"SPF". The message indicated that he was under supposedly investigation for money laundering offences and was instructed to contact the investigation officer listed in the SMS for further information. SPF clarified that none of these messages were sent by the police force. Verify via hotline SPF further advised members of the public to always verify the authenticity of the information by contacting the relevant government agencies through their official hotline. Should you receive a similar SMS, you can verify such information through the Police hotline at 1800-255-0000. The police added that licensed moneylenders are not allowed to solicit for loans via text messages, phone calls or social media platforms, are required to meet the borrower in person, and will not ask a loan applicant to make any payment before the disbursement of a loan. Furthermore, the business address of each licensed moneylender is published on the Ministry of Law’s Registry of Moneylenders website at