Ceo Of Pfizer, Pfizer, Clalit Health Services, Vaccinations, Variants, Health Worker

Ceo Of Pfizer, Pfizer

Pfizer CEO predicts 'we will able to come back to normal life' within a year even with new variants of the coronavirus

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said the COVID-19 virus would likely continue to evolve, requiring annual vaccinations.

27/9/2021 12:30:00 PM

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said the COVID-19 virus would likely continue to evolve, requiring annual vaccinations.

The US Food and Drug Administration last week authorized Pfizer boosters for people 65 years and older and others at high risk of severe COVID-19,

26 September 2021, 6:47 pm·3-min readA health worker administers a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at the Clalit Health Services in the Palestinian neighborhood of Beit Hanina, in the Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem, on August 29, 2021.Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images

MOH urges people to limit social activities as ICU patients continue to rise; 3,994 new Covid-19 cases Explainer: Has the Covid-19 stabilisation phase been effective, and what can we expect next? Volaris in El Salvador set to accept bitcoin

The CEO of Pfizer said Sunday the COVID-19 pandemic would likely subside by next year, allowing for a return to normal life.He said the COVID-19 virus would likely continue to evolve, requiring annual vaccinations.His comments are similar to those made last week by Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel.

See more stories on Insider's business page.Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said Sunday he believed life would return to normal within the next year even though new variants of COVID-19 are likely to continue to emerge around the globe."I agree that within a year I think we will be able to come back to normal life," Bourla said during an appearance on ABC News' "This Week." "I don't think this means that variants will not continue coming, and I don't think this means we should be able to live our lives without having vaccinations." headtopics.com

Bourla's commentsecho remarks made last week by Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel, who predicted the pandemic would end "in a year.""If you look at the industry-wide expansion of production capacities over the past six months, enough doses should be available by the middle of next year so that everyone on this Earth can be vaccinated," Bancel told Swiss newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung,

Reuters reported Thursday.Bancel said people who do not get vaccinated would "immunize themselves naturally" because the Delta variant is highly transmissible.This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.Update your settings here to see it.

"In this way we will end up in a situation similar to that of the flu. You can either get vaccinated and have a good winter. Or you don't do it and risk getting sick and possibly even ending up in hospital," he added.Bourla on Sunday told ABC News' George Stephanopoulos he believed COVID-19 would likely require annual vaccination to tackle variants that emerge across the world.

"The most likely scenario for me - because the virus is spread all over the world - is we will continue seeing new variants that are coming out, and also we will have vaccines that will last at least a year," he said. "I think the most likely scenario is annual vaccinations. But we don't know really. We need to wait and see the data." headtopics.com

All healthcare workers can apply for leave to go to vaccinated travel lane countries: MOH Holdings 92 people caught breaching COVID-19 measures at hawker centres during 'stepped-up' enforcement action: NEA Commentary: No, COVID-19 vaccines don’t stay in your body for years

Story continuesThe comments come as vaccine booster shots become available to millions of eligible Americans.The US Food and Drug Administration last weekauthorized Pfizer boostersfor people 65 years and older and others at high risk of severe COVID-19, including people who are more likely to get sick because of their health status, and others at high risk of exposure to the virus due to where they live and work, as Insider's Aria Bendix and Andrea Michelson reported.

The development came the same week thatthat of the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic. Read more: Yahoo Singapore »

Covid-19: From Oct 13, unvaccinated people not allowed to dine in or enter malls, attractions

SINGAPORE — Starting Wednesday (Oct 13) those who are not fully vaccinated will not be allowed entry into malls, large standalone stores, attractions, hawker centres and coffee shops, so as to protect them and reduce the strain on the healthcare system, the Ministry of Health (MOH) said.

Moderna vs Pfizer: Both knockouts, but one seems to have the edgeNEW YORK — It was a constant refrain from federal health officials after the coronavirus vaccines were authorised: These shots are all equally effective. Define 'edge'? current vaccine not good enough. need to hve one that has very long lasting effect. keep injecting booster is nt a viable solution. oni to enrich the pharmaceutical.

Covid: Immune therapy from llamas shows promiseThe COVID-19 therapy is a treatment made of 'nanobodies', small, simpler versions of antibodies, which llamas and camels produce naturally in response to infection.

Moderna vs Pfizer: Both knockouts, but one seems to have the edgeNEW YORK — It was a constant refrain from federal health officials after the coronavirus vaccines were authorised: These shots are all equally effective. Define 'edge'? current vaccine not good enough. need to hve one that has very long lasting effect. keep injecting booster is nt a viable solution. oni to enrich the pharmaceutical.

Singapore steps back from the ‘New Normal’SEPTEMBER 26 — So Singapore has re-introduced a slew of Covid-19 restrictions. Once again only groups of two people can dine out and households can receive only two visitors at a time... Though, unexpected and not welcomed by many. Still, one of the best routes available given the situation.

The verdict is in: Pregnant women pass COVID-fighting antibodies to their unborn childrenA new study found high antibody levels in newborns whose mothers had received the Pfizer or Moderna shots.