National digital literacy programme has enabled students to have access to digital devices amid COVID-19: Halimah Yacob

25/1/2022 9:46:00 AM

National digital literacy programme has enabled students to have access to digital devices amid COVID-19: Halimah Yacob

National digital literacy programme has enabled students to have access to digital devices amid COVID-19: Halimah Yacob

SINGAPORE: The Education Ministry\u0027s (MOE) National Digital Literacy Programme (NDLP) has enabled students to have access to digital devices amid the COVID-19 pandemic, President Halimah Yacob said on Tuesday (Jan 25). Speaking during a visit to Pasir Ris Secondary School, she said the personal learnin

With technology, students can also seek help online for their mental well-being, said Mdm Halimah.Stressing the importance of mental resilience throughout life, the President said the COVID-19 pandemic has “exacerbated” the situation, particularly for students who are studying and struggling with other issues in their lives.

“Because of isolation, the fact that you cannot tap on your usual social networks physically – it does have an impact. (For) mental resilience through technology, when students have any problems, they can go online, then they can get someone to respond to the problems that they have,” said Mdm Halimah.

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Digital literacy is “very important” not only for the learning, development and growth of students, but for them to integrate into society after they leave school, she added.Copy to clipboard https://str.Copy to clipboard https://str.Read now Please verify your e-mail to read this subscriber-only article in full The gift link for this subscriber-only article has expired.

With technology, students can also seek help online for their mental well-being, said Mdm Halimah. Stressing the importance of mental resilience throughout life, the President said the COVID-19 pandemic has “exacerbated” the situation, particularly for students who are studying and struggling with other issues in their lives. More than 616 million students are still being affected by full or partial school closures, the UN children's agency said. “Because of isolation, the fact that you cannot tap on your usual social networks physically – it does have an impact. Part of his role included oversight of spending and reducing fraud. (For) mental resilience through technology, when students have any problems, they can go online, then they can get someone to respond to the problems that they have,” said Mdm Halimah. "Quite simply, we are looking at a nearly insurmountable scale of loss to children's schooling," said Unicef Chief of Education Robert Jenkins in a statement, almost two years into the pandemic. “I think that's really important, because there is then someone they can talk to, they can relate to, someone they can seek help from.99/month for the first 3 months.

So that in a way helped them to get through this period." Unicef reported that"learning losses to school closures have left up to 70 per cent of 10-year-olds unable to read or understand a simple text, up from 53 per cent pre-pandemic" in countries with low and middle income.8 billion) in fraud across more than 80 billion pounds of job support given by the Treasury, but acknowledging that some fraud had occurred.” She also stressed the growing importance of cyber wellness. MOE rolled out a new character and citizenship education curriculum to lower secondary students in 2021. Rich countries are far from being spared. It was extended to upper secondary students this year. Finance Minister Rishi Sunak said on Twitter that Mr Agnew had served with diligence and commitment and thanked him for his"tireless work" during the pandemic. “It's not just a question of knowing how to access the different apps, use the computer to access information, but also it’s to know what is the information that is out there,” said Mdm Halimah. School dropouts are also a problem: in South Africa, between 400,000 and 500,000 students"reportedly dropped out of school altogether between March 2020 and July 2021.

Online users need to process this information, and may need people who can tell them that some of this information is not safe or may be detrimental, she added. For example, one of the activities at Pasir Ris Secondary School helps students to identify problems they may face when they share information on websites or social networking platforms like Instagram and Facebook “without thinking carefully”, she noted." More On This Topic.9 billion pounds of the loan claims had been fraudulent, the NAO said. Excessive gaming has also “become quite a serious problem” globally and in Singapore, said Mdm Halimah. Children and students should be taught about the dangers of excessive gaming, which “can become a problem”, she added. “Teaching our students or young people about the importance of accessing information, being on social media, Internet, but yet using it safely and responsibly, is important,” said Mdm Halimah." The Treasury said it was taking action on multiple fronts to crack down on anyone who had sought to exploit its programmes.

“Being a responsible user, you know that you don't want to use that platform in order to cause harm to others. "And raising your awareness to the potential of causing that harm is important so you become more responsible, so the place that you're leveraging on the Internet is safe for others as well as for you.” Source: CNA/hw(mi) .2 billion pounds in potential fraud from the Bounce Back Loan Scheme and 743 million pounds of overclaimed furlough grants.