Pregnant Women, Complications, British Scientists, University Of Oxford, Premature Birth, Women Giving Birth, Virus İnfection, Risk

Pregnant Women, Complications

More risks to pregnant women, their newborns from COVID-19 than known before - study

Women with COVID-19 during pregnancy were over 50% more likely to experience pregnancy complications compared to pregnant women unaffected by COVID-19, according to a new study.

25/4/2021 5:48:00 AM

Women with COVID-19 during pregnancy were over 50% more likely to experience pregnancy complications compared to pregnant women unaffected by COVID-19, according to a new study.

An infection of the new coronavirus in such newborns is associated with a three-fold risk of severe medical complications, according to a study conducted by scientists at the University of Oxford. Pregnant women are at higher risk of complications such as premature birth , high blood pressure with organ failure risk, need for intensive care and possible death.

AdMelde dich schnell, kostenlos und sicher an & hole dir deinen 100€ Sportwetten Bonus!Yahoo News SingaporeDeputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat has “left behind big shoes to fill” at the Ministry of Finance (MOF), said Education Minister Lawrence Wong on Friday (23 April).

Iswaran, WP MPs lock horns over editorial independence, choice of former PAP chairman to head SPH’s new media entity PM Lee Hsien Loong, other ministers speak out against racism after alleged attack 3 community cases, including 2 fully vaccinated linked to new Changi Airport cluster

2 days agoFire at Apple supplier near Shanghai kills eight including two firefightersEight people, including two firefighters, died after a fire on Thursday at a subsidiary factory of Taiwanese electronic manufacturer Casetek Group, a supplier of US tech giant Apple, in the outskirts of Shanghai. The fire broke out at 1:30pm on Thursday at the plant. It raged until Friday morning, trapping two firefighters and six civilians, according to a statement from the district government on Friday. The firefighters went missing while performing an overnight search for more people caught in the factory, owned by Shengrui Electronic Technology (Shanghai) Ltd in Jinshan District, in the southwestern part of the city. They, and the six other people, were confirmed dead on Friday morning. Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. Officials are still investigating how the blaze started, but the flames quickly engulfed the large plant when it gathered momentum. It was so fierce that over 900 firefighters, 123 fire engines and eight robots were deployed to fight the fire. According to the statement, the fire does not appear to have caused significant air or water pollution to the surrounding area. According to the Commercial Times, Shengrui Electronic Technology was acquired last year by the iPhone assembler Pegatron, another Taiwanese electronic manufacturer, which is how the company began to take orders for Apple products. Shengrui Electronic Technology is a subsidiary of Casetek Group, which is itself owned by Pegatron. Casetek is a manufacturer from Taiwan that builds casings for Apple’s MacBooks and iPads. China has experienced its share of firefighting tragedies in the past few years. Last March, 18 firefighters died trying to extinguish a wildfire that swept through a mountainous county in Sichuan province. A year before, another 27 firefighters died fighting a fire in the same area.More from South China Morning Post:Fire at Hong Kong tenement kills one, injures 10 others, including a firefighterThree killed in fire at Taiwan karaoke barApple supplier Luxshare unnerves Foxconn as US-China feud speeds supply chain shiftApple supplier Foxconn, others said to be disrupted by India’s greater scrutiny of imports from ChinaThis article Fire at Apple supplier near Shanghai kills eight including two firefighters first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

2 days agoSouth China Morning PostHong Kong protests: pro-independence group member jailed for 12 years over explosives find wanted to ‘create terror’ in city, judge saysHong Kong’s High Court has jailed a former member of a now-dissolved pro-independence group for 12 years for a bomb plot in the heaviest sentence to date over charges stemming from the anti-government protests and civil unrest of 2019. In sentencing Louis Lo Yat-sun on Friday, Mr Justice Andrew Chan Hing-wai said the 29-year-old defendant “came close to declaring war” on society by creating “terror among citizens” with his involvement in Hong Kong’s largest seizure of high explosives in two decades. The judge compared Lo’s crime to that committed by the late Yip Kai-foon, the notorious gangster who was jailed for 18 years in 1997 for possession of nearly 2kg of trinitrotoluene, or TNT.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. Lo had pleaded guilty earlier to one count of keeping explosives with intent to endanger life or property, after police seized 1kg of triacetone triperoxide, also known as TATP, in an industrial building in July 2019. He appeared calm upon hearing the sentence, and waved goodbye to his family and friends in the courtroom before being taken away by prison officers. Despite a lack of evidence linking Lo to the civil unrest, the judge ruled that the defendant had intended to use the explosives to subvert the government and push for the city’s independence, given the propaganda materials found in the industrial unit and his home, as well as two manuals on explosives on his mobile phone. Arrested Hong Kong protesters: how the numbers look one year on “The defendant’s action, in my view, came close to declaring war [on] the society,” the judge said. “The defendant in this case was going after the [Hong Kong] government, the stability of the region, with the intention of creating fear and terror among citizens within the society.” Lo, a former human resources manager at a logistics company, was a member of the Hong Kong National Front (HKNF) until the group was disbanded in June 2020, just ahead of the promulgation of the Beijing-imposed national security law. He was the first defendant to plead guilty to charges arising from the 2019 unrest at the High Court, where no sentencing cap applies. His offence is punishable by 20 years’ imprisonment under the Crimes Ordinance. The prosecution said Lo had stored the TATP in multiple batches in a rented studio in the Lung Shing Factory Building. Police found the explosives during a raid on July 19, 2019. Officers also discovered 10 petrol bombs, materials used to promote Hong Kong independence, and large amounts of weapons and equipment used by protesters, including helmets, masks and body shields. While Lo had admitted to possessing, not producing, the TATP, Judge Chan said the defendant was still as culpable as the one who had manufactured the high explosives. The judge concluded that Lo must have been the mastermind, given the frequency of his visits to the industrial studio and propaganda materials found there and at his home. Comparing Lo’s case with that of the late gangster Yip, Chan said the court was obliged to impose a heavy penalty. “Mr Yip Kai-foon, together with his gang, [was] more likely than not going after money ... [The defendant’s] criminality is just as serious, if not more, as Mr Yip,” the judge said. “This court would be failing its duty to the public if it does not impose a heavy, deterrent sentence [in cases] such as this.” Chan took Yip’s jail term as the starting point for Lo’s sentence, but granted a six-year remission for the defendant’s guilty plea. Yip, from Shanwei, Guangdong province, rose to notoriety for holding up jewellery stores in Hong Kong in the 1980s with a Kalashnikov. He was jailed for 18 years in 1985, but escaped four years later at Queen Mary Hospital. He was recaptured after a shoot-out with police in 1996 and ordered to serve 41 years for a string of charges, including possessing and using firearms, kidnapping and his escape. He later won an appeal and had his sentence reduced to just over 36 years, but died at the age of 55 at Queen Mary in April, 2017, while still serving time. More than 10,200 arrested in connection with Hong Kong protests since 2019 While police had earlier suggested links between the seized TATP and an anti-government march on July 21, 2019, prosecutors were unable to ascertain Lo’s motive, as he refused to say exactly how he had planned to use the powerful explosives. After initially accusing Lo of producing the explosives, prosecutors agreed to amend the charge to one of keeping explosives, given his guilty plea. Acting superintendent Lui Sze-ho, of the organised crime and triad bureau, praised the court’s ruling and said police would endeavour to make Hong Kong “the world’s safest city”. Police have investigated 17 cases involving the possession or production of explosives during the 2019 turmoil. Three cases have been slated for trial at the High Court.More from South China Morning Post:Large-scale counterterrorism drill staged at Hong Kong airport to strengthen city’s response to bomb attacks, marauding knifemenHong Kong protests: woman injured during intense clashes loses legal fight over police access of her medical recordsVideo: The complete version of SCMP’s protest documentary - China’s Rebel City: The Hong Kong ProtestsThis article Hong Kong protests: pro-independence group member jailed for 12 years over explosives find wanted to ‘create terror’ in city, judge says first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021. headtopics.com

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