Monkeypox presents moderate risk to global public health, WHO says

30/5/2022 1:27:00 AM

Monkeypox presents moderate risk to global public health, WHO says

https://str.sg/w2EzGENEVA (REUTERS) - The World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Sunday (May 29) that monkey pox constitutes a"moderate risk" to overall public health at global level after cases were reported in countries where the disease is not typically found.

"The public health risk could become high if this virus exploits the opportunity to establish itself as a human pathogen and spreads to groups at higher risk of severe disease such as young children and immunosuppressed persons," WHO said.As of May 26, a total of 257 confirmed cases and 120 suspected cases have been reported from 23 member states that are not endemic for the virus, the health agency said in a statement. There has been no reported fatalities so far.

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'We should not be surprised' if S'pore detects Monkeypox virus here in coming weeks: Ong Ye KungOver 200 cases of monkeypox have been detected in over 20 countries. Of course, Monkeypox will come to Singapore shortly. We do have monkeys. Monkeys see… monkeys do. Don't mind me. I am going to act surprised anyway .

First steps in reforming global health emergency rules adopted at WHO meeting: USGENEVA: Countries around the world on Saturday (May 28) adopted an initial US-led reform of the rules around disease outbreaks, known as the International Health Regulations (IHR), the United States said. The amendments, adopted at the World Health Organization (WHO) assembly, were agreed at a meeting seen

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Disease experts call on WHO, governments for more action on monkeypoxGENEVA: Some prominent infectious disease experts are pushing for faster action from global health authorities to contain a growing monkeypox outbreak that has spread to at least 20 countries. Th

Mexico confirms its first monkeypox caseMEXICO CITY: Health officials in Mexico confirmed Saturday (May 28) the country\u0027s first known case of monkeypox, in a 50-year-old US resident being treated in Mexico City. The man, a permanent resident of New York City, \u0022was probably infected in the Netherlands,\u0022 Hugo Lopez-Gatell, an undersecretary of hea

Not a surprise if Singapore detects monkeypox case in coming weeks: Ong Ye KungSINGAPORE: It should not be a surprise if Singapore detects a monkeypox case in the coming weeks, as people in the country travel widely and also due to its position as a commercial and international hub, said Health Minister Ong Ye Kung on Saturday (May 28). However, he assured that Singapore ha Many travellers are coming in now, of course not a surprise. It is a surprise if no case here. When the government said this.... it means it's likely to come. Another plandemic

Copy to clipboard https://str.Facebook post on May 28 that Singapore should not be surprised if a case of monkeypox is detected here in the coming weeks.LinkedIn GENEVA: Countries around the world on Saturday (May 28) adopted an initial US-led reform of the rules around disease outbreaks, known as the International Health Regulations (IHR), the United States said.Copy to clipboard https://str.

sg/w2Ez GENEVA (REUTERS) - The World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Sunday (May 29) that monkey pox constitutes a"moderate risk" to overall public health at global level after cases were reported in countries where the disease is not typically found. "The public health risk could become high if this virus exploits the opportunity to establish itself as a human pathogen and spreads to groups at higher risk of severe disease such as young children and immunosuppressed persons," WHO said. Monkeypox not the same as Covid Ong said that the potential for monkeypox to become a pandemic like Covid-19 is unlikely. As of May 26, a total of 257 confirmed cases and 120 suspected cases have been reported from 23 member states that are not endemic for the virus, the health agency said in a statement. The changes sought by Washington, and backed by others such as Japan and the European Union, mark a first step in a broader reform of the IHR, which set out countries' legal obligations around disease outbreaks, expected to take up to two years. There has been no reported fatalities so far. For example, if you are highly exposed to someone with rash lesions because of monkeypox, you might be potentially infected by the virus. WHO also said that the sudden appearance of monkeypox at once in several non-endemic countries suggests undetected transmission for some time and recent amplifying events. The WHO is considering whether the outbreak should be assessed as a potential public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC), an official told Reuters.

The agency added that it expects more cases to be reported as surveillance in endemic and non-endemic countries expands. This was due to an of the virus in 2019. Source: Reuters. Monkeypox is an infectious disease that is usually mild, and is endemic in parts of west and central Africa. It is spread by close contact, so it can be relatively easily contained through measures such as self-isolation and hygiene. Once confined to certain places in Africa, the virus spreads in several ways such as through contact with infected animals, humans or items contaminated with the virus. Most of the cases reported so far have been "The vast majority of reported cases so far have no established travel links to an endemic area and have presented through primary care or sexual health services," the UN agency said. More On This Topic . The virus can incubate in a person for up to three weeks, with symptoms lasting between two to four weeks. Eckerle called for the WHO to encourage countries to put more coordinated and stringent isolation measures in place even without an emergency declaration.