Monkeypox has likely spread undetected 'for some time', says WHO

1/6/2022 7:33:00 PM

Monkeypox has likely spread undetected 'for some time', says WHO

https://str.sg/w2tqGENEVA (AFP) - The WHO said on Wednesday (June 1) that hundreds of monkeypox cases have surfaced beyond the African countries where the disease is typically found, warning the virus has likely been spreading under the radar."Investigations are ongoing, but the sudden appearance of monkeypox in many countries at the same time suggests there may have been undetected transmission for some time," World Health Organisation chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters.

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Unlikely monkeypox outbreak will lead to pandemic, WHO says

WHO aims to contain monkeypox outbreak by minimising human transmissionBERLIN — It is not clear yet whether the spread of monkeypox can be contained completely, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Tuesday (May 31), adding that its goal was to contain the outbreak by stopping human-to-human transmission to the maximum extent possible.

WHO aims to contain monkeypox outbreak by minimising human transmissionBERLIN - It is not clear yet whether the spread of monkeypox can be contained completely, the World Health Organisation said on Tuesday (May 31), adding that its goal was to contain the outbreak by stopping human-to-human transmission to the maximum extent possible. 'Tools to manage it – including readily available diagnostics, vaccines and therapeutics – are not likely to...

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Copy to clipboard https://str.Copy to clipboard https://str.A handout photo."Tools to manage it — including readily available diagnostics, vaccines and therapeutics — are not likely to be immediately or widely accessible to countries," it said in a statement.

sg/w2tq GENEVA (AFP) - The WHO said on Wednesday (June 1) that hundreds of monkeypox cases have surfaced beyond the African countries where the disease is typically found, warning the virus has likely been spreading under the radar. "Investigations are ongoing, but the sudden appearance of monkeypox in many countries at the same time suggests there may have been undetected transmission for some time," World Health Organisation chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters. There have been 71 additional cases of monkeypox identified in England, the agency said on Monday, taking the total number of confirmed cases in the United Kingdom as a whole since May 7 to 179. Since on May 7, more than 550 confirmed cases of the disease have been verified in 30 countries outside of the west and central African nations where it is endemic, the WHO said. More than 300 suspected and confirmed cases of monkeypox - a usually mild illness that spreads through close contact and can cause flu-like symptoms and pus-filled skin lesions - have been reported in May, mostly in Europe. The UN health agency's top monkeypox expert Rosamund Lewis said that the appearance of so many cases across much of Europe and other countries where it has not been seen before"is clearly a cause for concern, and it does suggest undetected transmission for a while". Scientists are looking into what might explain the unusual surge of cases, given most are not linked to travel. "We don't know if it is weeks, months or possibly a couple for years," she said, adding that"we don't really know if it is too late to contain".

Monkeypox is related to smallpox, which killed millions around the world every year before it was eradicated in 1980. Infected people can limit the risk of spread by using standard cleaning and disinfection methods, and washing their own clothing and bedlinen with detergents in a washing machine, the agency advised. Asked whether this monkeypox outbreak has the potential to grow into a pandemic, Rosamund Lewis, technical lead for monkeypox from the WHO Health Emergencies Programme said: "We don't know but we don't think so. 'Fight stigma' But monkeypox, which spreads through close contact, is much less severe, with symptoms typically including a high fever and a blistery chickenpox-like rash that clears up after a few weeks. So far, most cases have been reported among men who have sex with men, although experts stress there is no evidence that monkeypox is transmitted sexually. The highest risk of transmission is through direct contact with someone with monkeypox - but the overall risk to the UK population remains low, said Ruth Milton, senior medical advisor and monkeypox strategic response director at UKHSA. "Anyone can be infected with monkeypox if they have close physical contact with someone else who is infected," Tedros said. [[nid:581207]] "We really don't actually yet know whether there's asymptomatic transmission of monkeypox - the indications in the past have been that this is not a major feature - but this remains to be determined, she said. He urged everyone to help"fight stigma, which is not just wrong, it could also prevent infected individuals from seeking care, making it harder to stop transmission. The smallpox and monkeypox viruses are closely related.

" The WHO, he said, was also"urging affected countries to widen their surveillance". Lewis insisted it was vital"that we collectively all work together to prevent onward spread," through contact tracing and isolation of people with the disease. The vaccine will now also be offered to healthcare workers involved in the care of patients with confirmed monkeypox and staff working in sexual health services who have been identified as assessing suspected cases. Scientists are therefore looking into what might explain this unusual surge of cases, while public health authorities suspect there is some degree of community transmission. Remote video URL .