‘I couldn’t move my body’: Singaporean, 30, stricken by myocarditis; doctors explain why younger people get it

15/8/2022 8:00:00 AM

WATCH: In May, Ms Lee Pei Hsia came down with a #fever. The 30-year-old did not expect the #viral infection to lead to a serious case of acute #myocarditis, which is an inflammatory condition of the heart muscle.

WATCH: In May, Ms Lee Pei Hsia came down with a fever. The 30-year-old did not expect the viral infection to lead to a serious case of acute myocarditis, which is an inflammatory condition of the heart muscle.

SINGAPORE — In May, Ms Lee Pei Hsia came down with a fever. What had initially looked like a viral infection led to a serious case of acute myocarditis, which is an inflammatory condition of the heart muscle. The 30-year-old financial adviser said: “I thought it was just a common infection. I didn’t

After developing a fever, she recalled feeling weak and had trouble falling asleep at night due to chest pain and breathlessness. She also vomited.In May, Ms Lee Pei Hsia came down with a fever. Being young and healthy, the 30-year-old did not expect the viral infection to lead to a serious case of acute myocarditis, which is an inflammatory condition of the heart muscle. Read more here. Video: Nuria Ling, Raj Nadarajan/TODAY

Assistant Professor Louis Teo, senior consultant at the department of cardiology at National Heart Centre Singapore (NHCS), explained that the Sars-Cov-2 coronavirus, which causes Covid-19, can directly infect the heart cells and damage them.They include the adenovirus (which causes cold-like symptoms), influenza virus, and the dengue, hepatitis B and C, varicella and rubella viruses.

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