Global chip shortage likely to last through 2023: US official

31/5/2022 9:03:00 PM

Global chip shortage likely to last through 2023: US official

https://str.sg/w2jSWASHINGTON (AFP) - The global shortage of critical semiconductors is likely to last at least through next year and perhaps longer, US Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo warned on Tuesday (May 31).Shutdowns of key Asian suppliers due to the Covid-19 pandemic crippled supplies last year, just when American consumers, flush with cash from government aid, went on a spending spree buying cars and electronics, which depend on the chips.

"I do not unfortunately see the chip shortage abating in any meaningful way anytime in the next year," Raimondo told reporters following her recent trip to Asia.She said she convened a dozen CEOs, including leaders of chipmakers, during her time in South Korea to discuss the shortage"and they all agreed that ... deep into 2023, possibly early '24 before we see any real relief."

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sg/w2jS WASHINGTON (AFP) - The global shortage of critical semiconductors is likely to last at least through next year and perhaps longer, US Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo warned on Tuesday (May 31). Shutdowns of key Asian suppliers due to the Covid-19 pandemic crippled supplies last year, just when American consumers, flush with cash from government aid, went on a spending spree buying cars and electronics, which depend on the chips. Applicants are also eligible if they have experienced an income loss of at least 30 per cent from all jobs if they are earning a salary of $3,000 or less. "I do not unfortunately see the chip shortage abating in any meaningful way anytime in the next year," Raimondo told reporters following her recent trip to Asia. Mr Alex Yam, the mayor of North West District, said:"These past two years have been a trying ordeal for many families in Singapore. She said she convened a dozen CEOs, including leaders of chipmakers, during her time in South Korea to discuss the shortage"and they all agreed that . "As we move through this transition, it is a reminder to us all to not forget our neighbours and friends who may need a helping hand..7-5.

. She said:"For years, we have rallied and mobilised our strong network of partners to. She said:"For years, we have rallied and mobilised our strong network of partners to. deep into 2023, possibly early '24 before we see any real relief." She repeated her call for Congress to act to provide funding for legislation that aims to stimulate domestic manufacturing of the computer chips that are key to a wide array of products, from smartphones to medical equipment to vacuum cleaners.. "We are really on borrowed time," she said. assist the needy and bond the community. "Every other country has subsidies on the table now, and if Congress doesn't act very quickly," key producers like Samsung, Intel and Micron"are going to build in another country and that be that would be hugely problematic. I am grateful for the compassion and cooperation shown by (the temple) to do good for Singaporeans who are in need, regardless of race or religion.3 per cent so far this year, a depreciation rate that Warjiyo said was better than some other emerging markets.

" The US Senate and the House of Representatives each have approved US$52 billion Bills - the CHIPS Act and the America COMPETES Act - that would invest in domestic chip research and manufacturing, but so far have failed to agree on the final form of the legislation. More On This Topic . Ms Low Yen Ling, the chairman of mayors' committee and mayor of South West District, said:"As we move towards a post-Covid-19 new normal, there's no letting up in the CDCs' efforts to uplift the vulnerable among us. Ms Low Yen Ling, the chairman of mayors' committee and mayor of South West District, said:"As we move towards a post-Covid-19 new normal, there's no letting up in the CDCs' efforts to uplift the vulnerable among us.