'Girls' education is a climate solution': Malala Yousafzai joins climate protest

10/6/2022 7:12:00 PM

'Girls' education is a climate solution': Malala Yousafzai joins climate protest

Education, Climate Change

'Girls' education is a climate solution': Malala Yousafzai joins climate protest

STOCKHOLM: The fight against climate change is also a fight for the right to education of girls, millions of whom lose access to schools due to climate-related events, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai told Reuters on Friday (Jun 10). Yousafzai was speaking outside the Swedish parliament where sh

STOCKHOLM: The fight against climate change is also a fight for the right to education of girls, millions of whom lose access to schools due to climate-related events, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai told Reuters on Friday (Jun 10).Yousafzai was speaking outside the Swedish parliament where she joined environmental campaigners Greta Thunberg and Vanessa Nakate at one of the Friday climate protests which have been held there every week since 2018 and sparked a global movement.

In 2012, the now 24-year-old survived being shot in the head by a Pakistani Taliban gunman after she was targeted for her campaign against the Taliban's efforts to deny women education.She subsequently became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for her education advocacy.

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Singapore’s dengue ‘emergency’ considered a ‘climate change wake-up call’ for the world - The Independent Singapore News“Changing environmental conditions are magnifying mosquito breeding rates, so unless the climate emergency improves, it will become even more difficult to eliminate the risk of dengue fever altogether. And it will be a painful battle for Singapore in the long run.” — Winston Chow, Climate Scientist, Singapore Management University

LinkedIn STOCKHOLM: The fight against climate change is also a fight for the right to education of girls, millions of whom lose access to schools due to climate-related events, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai told Reuters on Friday (Jun 10).Copy to clipboard https://str.Copy to clipboard https://str.Copy to clipboard https://str.

Yousafzai was speaking outside the Swedish parliament where she joined environmental campaigners Greta Thunberg and Vanessa Nakate at one of the Friday climate protests which have been held there every week since 2018 and sparked a global movement. In 2012, the now 24-year-old survived being shot in the head by a Pakistani Taliban gunman after she was targeted for her campaign against the Taliban's efforts to deny women education. The research, released by a consortium of 55 developing nations across Africa, Asia, the Americas and the Pacific, comes as UN climate negotiators meeting in Germany wrangle over"loss and damage" - the costs of climate change impacts that are already unfolding. She subsequently became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for her education advocacy. Singapore has been a party to the Montreal Protocol since 1989. "Due to climate-related events, millions of girls lose their access to schools. Ghana's Finance Minister Kenneth Nana Yaw Ofori-Atta, who wrote the preface to the report, said the finding should"sound alarm bells for the world economy", calling for global action to support nations most exposed. Events like droughts and floods impact schools directly, displacements are caused due to some of these events," Yousafzai said in an interview. China recently struck a security pact with the Solomon Islands, to the consternation of the United States and its Australian and New Zealand allies, who have for decades seen the Pacific islands as largely their sphere of influence.

"Because of that, girls are impacted the most: They are the first ones to drop out of schools and the last ones to return. It finds that rising temperature and modified rainfall patterns have already reduced wealth in these countries by 20 per cent, or US$525 billion (S$722 billion), over the past two decades. However, HFCs are potent greenhouse gases that contribute significantly to global warming." During the demonstration, Yousafzai recounted a story of how her own education was interrupted by climate change as her school and many others in the locality were flooded. Yousafzai, Nakate and Thunberg all stressed how women, especially those in developing countries, were disproportionately affected by the climate crisis and can be part of the solution if they are empowered by education. "Losses and damage go well beyond what can be quantified in dollars and cents in the form of lost and destroyed lives, livelihoods, land, even threats to our culture. "When girls and women are educated, it helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions, it helps build resilience and it also helps reduce the existing inequalities that so many women and girls face in different parts of the world," said Nakate, a 25-year-old activist from Uganda. These aim to shift the market towards more climate-friendly technologies and equipment. Nobel peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai attends a "Fridays For Future" protest, in Stockholm, Sweden, Jun 10, 2022. Vulnerable countries say wealthy nations' failure to curb emissions - coupled with a lack of adequate adaptation funding - is leading to ever-greater losses and damages as temperatures rise. "Climate change is a global issue, one that is writ large in our region, and we are very eager to work alongside our Pacific partners on this significant threat," said Ms Ardern.

(Photo: Reuters/Philip O'Connor) Nobel peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai attends a "Fridays For Future" protest in Stockholm, Sweden, Jun 10, 2022. (Photo: Reuters/Philip O'Connor) Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate, Nobel peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai and Swedish activist Greta Thunberg attend a "Fridays For Future" protest outside the Swedish parliament, in Stockholm, Sweden, Jun 10, 2022. Africa was particularly affected, it said, adding that one estimate suggests gross domestic product per capita was around 13 per cent lower for African countries in 2010 than it would have been without the previous two decades of global warming. Since 2019, HFCs imported into Singapore have been subject to licensing controls. (Photo: Reuters/Philip O'Connor) Related: Taliban orders girl high schools to remain closed, leaving students in tears Yousafzai, who through her Malala Fund has also become a global symbol of the resilience of women in the face of repression, took selfies with passing locals and tourists, and talked at length to the Fridays For Future activists who have protested outside the parliament building since 2018, becoming a global movement in the process. Activists unveiled banners and placards expressing support for the right of Afghan girls to education and linking the climate crisis and future solutions to it to the educational opportunities of women around the world. Developing nations managed to push loss and damage up the agenda at the Glasgow UN summit last year. "Any girl can change the world if provided with the right tools to do so," said Thunberg, 19. More On This Topic. Some 670,000 New Zealand citizens - nearly 15 per cent of the smaller country's population - live in Australia, according to official data.

Source: Reuters/ng . More On This Topic Developing countries are leading climate actions: Daily Star contributor "People are suffering, people are dying, how are we going to help them?" said Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate on the sidelines of the meeting.