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Singapore Armed Forces, Confirmed Cases

2 new community COVID cases, including fully-vaccinated cleaner, 88

The Ministry of Health (MOH) on Thursday (6 May) confirmed 18 new COVID-19 cases in Singapore, taking the country's total case count to 61,286.

6/5/2021 6:40:00 PM

Five more locations were added to the list of public places visited by COVID-19 cases such as Yummy Food Link (over seven days) and NTUC FairPrice at White Sands. The places were visited between 22 April to 4 May. READ MORE:

The Ministry of Health (MOH) on Thursday (6 May) confirmed 18 new COVID-19 cases in Singapore, taking the country's total case count to 61,286.

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14 hours agoPolice investigating cause of midnight blaze in Hong Kong residential blockPolice are investigating the cause of a blaze that broke out in a Hong Kong residential block on Wednesday, sending a woman to hospital and forcing more than 30 to flee from their homes. Emergency personnel were sent to the six-storey building on Canton Road in Mong Kok at 12.08am when a first-floor flat burst into flames. No one was inside the flat at the time, according to police. Dense smoke billowed out from the burning flat, spreading to the staircases and forcing 32 tenants to flee the building.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. According to the Fire Services Department, 12 fire engines and two ambulances were deployed to the scene. “Firefighters had to break through the door to enter the flat and fight the blaze with two water jets,” its spokeswoman said. Four family members, including 2-year-old girl, killed in blaze She said the flat was packed with piles of sundry items and firefighters spent more than two hours battling the flames. A search was also carried out inside the flat to ensure no one was trapped. Two female tenants inhaled smoke while fleeing from the building and complained of feeling unwell. One of them, aged 40, was sent conscious to Kwong Wah Hospital in Yau Ma Tei for treatment. The other one was treated at the scene. The spokeswoman said initial investigation found nothing suspicious about the cause of the fire, and the case had been handed over to police. A police spokesman said some accelerant substances were found at the scene and officers were investigating the cause of the blaze. There were two cases of deadly fire in the city over a stretch of four days last month. On April 16, a 47-year-old woman, her two daughters and granddaughter were killed in a fire at their flat in Kwun Tong. The woman’s husband was also critically injured. Fatal fire at Hong Kong housing estate leaves one dead, one injured Police said a lithium battery in an electric massage chair in the flat was suspected to have overheated, causing the piece of furniture to burst into flames. The fire department said a task force had been set up to investigate the cause of the blaze. On April 19, a 70-year-old man suffered serious burns while trying to put out a fire that broke out in his Sham Shui Po flat. He died in hospital the next day.More from South China Morning Post:Fatal fire at Hong Kong housing estate leaves one dead, one injuredFour family members, including 2-year-old girl, killed in Hong Kong housing estate blaze after massage chair catches fireThis article Police investigating cause of midnight blaze in Hong Kong residential block first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021.

a day agoSouth China Morning PostUS efforts to rally allies may not sway China, says Joe Biden’s top Asia officialThe United States should prepare for the possibility that its strategy to rally allies to confront China may not succeed in pressuring Beijing to alter its behaviour, the White House’s top Asia official said on Tuesday. One abiding belief held by China analysts was that the Chinese government would alter course if it faced opposition from a front of other countries, said Kurt Campbell, who serves as the Indo-Pacific coordinator on the Biden administration’s National Security Council. “I believe that there is some hope for that, but at the same time I do believe that Chinese foreign policy is in the midst of a substantial evolution,” Campbell said during a discussion event hosted by the Financial Times.Do you have questions about the biggest topics and trends from around the world? Get the answers with SCMP Knowledge, our new platform of curated content with explainers, FAQs, analyses and infographics brought to you by our award-winning team. “It’s entirely possible that in some circumstances they will simply double down and that they will not backtrack,” he said. “And I think we have to recognise that some elements of our playbook may require revision.” As the Biden administration has formulated its nascent China policy, senior officials have repeatedly highlighted the need to bolster partnerships with allies to confront Beijing, distancing themselves from the go-it-alone approach of the previous administration. In the new administration’s first three months, the push for multilateralism has brought coordinated sanctions with allies against Beijing over its treatment of ethnic minority groups in China’s far west; a rare joint statement from Tokyo and Washington regarding the importance of peace in the Taiwan Strait; and a G7 session this week dedicated entirely to the challenges posed by Beijing. Yet Chinese officials have shown little sign of bowing to the mounting pressure, instead issuing their own retaliatory sanctions, dismissing criticism as interference in China’s internal affairs, and using a bilateral meeting in Alaska to chastise US diplomats in front of the cameras over their claims to occupy a “position of strength”. Speaking on Tuesday, Campbell did not suggest that a refusal by Beijing to change course in the face of an international front meant the policy was not worth pursuing. Rather, he said, a coordinated approach would help the US and allies to better defend their interests should China continue to rebuff their grievances. “The reason that we work together with other countries is not simply about the hope that China will change course, but [is also] for the goal of working with other countries in and of itself,” Campbell said. “It leads to greater resiliency: we may need to work more closely together if we face, in some circumstances, an implacable set of circumstances with regard to China.” Campbell’s remarks come as the Biden administration wades through an inter-agency review of its China policy, touching on matters ranging from defence to the suite of tariffs on Chinese imports – a legacy of the Trump administration. What is going on in Xinjiang and who are the Uygur people? Top US officials have publicly expressed the belief that the Chinese government under President Xi Jinping is pursuing an increasingly authoritarian agenda, be that domestically, in the Indo-Pacific region or in multilateral forums such as the United Nations. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in a recent CBS interview that Beijing was “acting more repressively at home and more aggressively abroad”, while US President Joe Biden last week described Xi as an autocrat who was “deadly earnest about [China] becoming the most significant, consequential nation in the world”. The prospect of a Chinese government increasingly defiant of international pressure came as Xi chose to surround himself with a smaller number of loyalists, said Campbell, a long-time China expert who previously served as Barack Obama’s top diplomat overseeing East Asian and Pacific affairs. Xi had moved China’s governance away from a model of collective leadership towards a scenario in which he would listen to the counsel of three to seven advisers, according to Campbell, who said: “He is a person who likes to be reaffirmed in his views.” Asked about any plans for Biden to convene a face-to-face meeting with Xi, Campbell suggested that such an event was a way off. “We want to make sure that the set of circumstances domestically in the United States are appropriate before we undertake some of the things that we’re contemplating [regarding China] as we go forward,” he said. The Biden administration’s early approach to handling relations with Beijing – keeping in place many of the Trump administration’s unilateral policies while fortifying partnerships with like-minded nations – represented “the worst of all worlds” for Beijing, said Elizabeth Economy, a senior fellow for China studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. Despite the double-pronged approach, it would be “very difficult” to get China to change course on issues surrounding Hong Kong and Xinjiang, said Economy, speaking alongside Campbell at the Financial Times event. But that could change if an increasing number of countries in the Middle East and Africa began to join the international outcry over China’s actions in Xinjiang, according to Economy. “It’s easiest for China to push back against this when it’s just the United States or even just the United States and sort of the advanced democracies” because Beijing can frame such opposition as “an effort by the US to contain China in some way”, she said. Additional reporting by Robert DelaneyThis article US efforts to rally allies may not sway China, says Joe Biden’s top Asia official first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2021. headtopics.com

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Outpouring of support will spur me on, says Joseph Schooling after Olympics exit

TOKYO: Less than a day after his exit from the 2020 Olympic Games, Joseph Schooling sits on a foldable chair in the shadow of the hulking Tokyo ...

On December 4, 2014 Allah showed me. Two out of three castles were destroyed by the wicked Illuminati forces. And they faced not much resistance. Muhammad Qasim Dreams