Indonesia's Covid-19 cases decline despite return of Ramadan bustle

16/4/2022 5:00:00 PM

Indonesia has seen a declining number of daily Covid-19 cases.

Indonesia, Covid-19

Indonesia has seen a declining number of daily Covid-19 cases.

Indonesia has seen a declining number of daily Covid-19 cases in the past few weeks despite the continued relaxation of pandemic rules and an increase in public mobility.

On Thursday, Indonesia recorded 833 new cases of Covid-19. It was the first time the country recorded less than 1,000 daily cases since mid-January.During the third COovid-19 wave fuelled by the highly contagious Omicron variant, daily cases climbed rapidly from mere hundreds in mid-January to a peak of more than 63,000 cases by Feb. 17.

The positivity rate also dropped below 1 percent on Thursday – to 0.85 percent – for the first time since January. The bed occupancy rate has dropped to 4 percent as of Wednesday, down 2 percent from the previous week.These improving numbers occurred amid unprecedented relaxations of Covid-19 restrictions as Indonesia seeks to gradually transition to endemicity.

Read more:
The Star »

PM still finalising Cabinet, Dec 1 unveiling not likely

BREAKING NEWS: Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim is still putting the final touches to his Cabinet line-up and contrary to some media reports, will not be naming them on Thursday (Dec 1). Read more >>

Covid-19 (April 14): 10,413 new cases, 18 deathsUptick in R-number after new cases at 5-digit mark for two consecutive days.

Covid-19 Watch: 10,413 new cases bring total to 4,363,024PETALING JAYA: Malaysia recorded 10,413 new Covid-19 cases on Thursday (April 14), says the Health Ministry.

Covid-19: 10,413 new cases, 22 deathsPETALING JAYA: The Health Ministry reported 18 Covid-19 deaths yesterday. The death toll now stands at 35,381. Five of the deaths were classified as b...

Health Ministry logs 10,413 new Covid-19 cases, 18 more deaths | Malay MailKUALA LUMPUR, April 15 — The Health Ministry (MoH) recorded 10,413 new Covid-19 cases yesterday, bringing the total number of infections detected in the country since the pandemic started to 4,363,024. In a statement today, Health director-general Tan Sri Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah also stated that...

Covid-19: Education clusters re-emerge, dominate new casesKUALA LUMPUR: there has been a resurgence of Covid-19 cases at educational institutions in the country, with 17 clusters or 85% out of 19 clusters reported from April 9 to 14, according to data from the Health Ministry.

Shanghai reports slight drop in Covid-19 cases as economic impact bitesSHANGHAI (April 15): Shanghai posted a slight decline in new infections on Friday as the lockdown in the commercial capital at the centre of China's Covid-19 outbreak, coupled with curbs elsewhere, threatens to take a heavier toll on the world's second-biggest economy.China's efforts to stop the virus with a strict 'zero-Covid' policy are triggering economic disruptions that are rippling through global supply chains for goods from electric vehicles to iPhones.Electric-car maker Xpeng and technology giant Huawei warned of looming

The total virus caseload has dropped around 38 percent in the past week from 15,055 cases to 9,329, while the number of active cases fell by 34..According to the ministry's CovidNow portal, 10,386 of the new Covid-19 infections in the country were local transmissions, while there were 27 imported cases.: The Health Ministry reported 18 Covid-19 deaths yesterday.

7 per cent from 98,000 cases to 64,000. On Thursday, Indonesia recorded 833 new cases of Covid-19. It was the first time the country recorded less than 1,000 daily cases since mid-January. Article type: free. During the third COovid-19 wave fuelled by the highly contagious Omicron variant, daily cases climbed rapidly from mere hundreds in mid-January to a peak of more than 63,000 cases by Feb. 17. Meanwhile, the ministry also reported 10,413 new Covid-19 cases, bringing the cumulative infections to 4,363,024.

The positivity rate also dropped below 1 percent on Thursday – to 0.85 percent – for the first time since January. The bed occupancy rate has dropped to 4 percent as of Wednesday, down 2 percent from the previous week. These improving numbers occurred amid unprecedented relaxations of Covid-19 restrictions as Indonesia seeks to gradually transition to endemicity. Last month, authorities waived mandatory quarantine for fully vaccinated international visitors and lifted the Covid-19 test requirement for domestic travelers who have received booster shots.

For the first time in two years, the government has allowed Muslims to pray at public mosques without physical-distancing requirements or a limit on the number of worshipers allowed to gather at any one time. It has also allowed people to embark on the mudik (exodus) for Idul Fitri, marking the first time in two years since travel restrictions were eased for holiday festivities. Increase in mobility The relaxation has led to a significant increase in public mobility, with people beginning to crowd shopping centers, restaurants and places of worship. National Covid-19 task force spokesperson Wiku Adi Sasmito said that as of March 30, public mobility had reached the highest level since the pandemic started. "Especially in public parks, supermarkets, malls and vacation spots," Wiku said last week as reported by tempo.

co. According to Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data, people’s movement around public parks increased more than four times in March from the previous month, from 7.39 percent to 32.19 percent. Similar increases also occurred in offices, with mobility increasing from 6.

23 to 6.57 per cent, and in supermarkets, where mobility rose from 25.75 percent to 27.85 percent. Wiku said public mobility was expected to continue to rise until the Idul Fitri holiday, when millions of people are predicted to participate in mudik in early May.

Authorities are expecting 85 million people to go on mudik, with some 14 million travelers set to leave Greater Jakarta alone. This figure is much higher than pre-pandemic levels, when some 30 million people participated in the annual tradition. Concerns over new wave High public mobility has raised concerns over the possibility of another wave of Covid-19 transmission, as Indonesia's previous infection spikes usually occurred following a long holiday period when people travel and gather with their relatives. The country saw its worst run of infections in July of last year, six weeks after millions of people participated in the annual mudik to celebrate Idul Fitri despite a prevailing travel ban. This was considered to have exacerbated the spread of the Delta variant across the nation, with Covid-19 cases spiking 374 per cent.

High public mobility during last year's Christmas and New Year's holiday – with some 5.8 million people traveling across the country – fueled the spread of the highly contagious Omicron variant, triggering COVID-19's third wave in Indonesia. Health Minister Budi Gunadi Sadikin has expressed optimism that high mobility during the upcoming Idul Fitri holiday would not cause another wave of infections. "Based on our observations, the main cause of a surge of infections is not [long] holidays but the emergence of new variants [of concerns]. I'm sure we'll not see another wave of infections after Idul Fitri, but we must pray that there will not be another [dangerous] new variant emerging in the future," Budi told a seminar on Wednesday.

While the BA.2 subvariant of Omicron has caused an uptick in cases in some European and Asian countries, Indonesia has yet to see a similar increase, he said. However, hexperts still believe that there is still a possibility that high public mobility during the Idul Fitri holiday would cause another surge in Covid-19 cases, especially considering the fact that some 15 percent of Indonesia's population still does not have immunity against the virus. "The government's latest seroprevalence survey found that some 86.6 per cent of Indonesians had developed coronavirus antibodies, which means that around 15 per cent, or 40 million people, still don't have immunity against the disease," he said.

However, he believed that the surge of cases would not be as dramatic as last year, as most patients would be asymptomatic, so they would very likely not get tested for Covid-19. - The Jakarta Post/ANN Article type: free .