Brexit, Britain, Operation Yellowhammer

Brexit, Britain

UK govt releases 'worst case' details on no-deal Brexit

The British government has published its 'Operation Yellowhammer' 'reasonable worst case planning assumptions' in the event of a no-deal Brexit

11.9.2019

The British government has published its ' Operation Yellowhammer ' 'reasonable worst case planning assumptions' in the event of a no-deal Brexit

The British government has published its ' Operation Yellowhammer ' 'reasonable worst case planning assumptions' in the event of a no-deal Brexit , in response to MPs voting for it to happen.

The British government has published its "Operation Yellowhammer" "reasonable worst case planning assumptions" in the event of a no-deal Brexit, in response to MPs voting for it to happen. The document says: "Protests and counter-protests will take place across the UK and may absorb significant amounts of police resource. "There may also be a rise in public disorder and community tensions." The document also says: "Low-income groups will be disproportionately affected by any price rises in food and fuel." Cross-border financial services, law enforcement data sharing, and the flow of personal data could be disrupted, the document says. The document's assumptions are "as of 2 August" this year, and it notes that day one after Brexit is a Friday "which may not be to our advantage" and may coincide with the end of the October half-term school holidays. The government dossier says France will impose EU mandatory controls on UK goods "on day 1 no deal" - 'D1ND' as the document refers to it - and have built infrastructure and IT systems to manage and process customs declarations and support a risk-based control regime. The document says UK citizens travelling to and from the EU "may be subject to increased immigration checks at EU border posts". It warns: "This may lead to passenger delays at St Pancras, Cheriton (Channel Tunnel) and Dover where juxtaposed controls are in place. "Dependent on the plans EU member states put in place to cope with these increased immigration checks, it is likely that delays will occur for UK arrivals and departures at EU airports and ports. "This could cause some disruption on transport services. Travellers may decide to use alternative routes to complete their journey." Read more: RTÉ News

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Irish people WILL have duty-free shopping for UK trips under a no-deal BrexitIRISH travellers will have duty-free shopping when travelling to Britain in the event of a no-deal Brexit , it’s emerged. UK Chancellor Sajid Javid last night announced British fliers will get…

No-deal Brexit to see return of duty-free shopping for passengers between Ireland and UKDuty-free shopping will be reintroduced for travellers between Ireland and Britain in the event of a no-deal Brexit .

No-deal Brexit to see return of duty-free shopping for passengers between Ireland and UKDuty-free shopping will be reintroduced for travellers between Ireland and Britain in the event of a no-deal Brexit .

Irish people will have duty-free shopping on UK trips under no-deal BrexitPassengers will able to buy alcohol, cigarettes and perfumes at hugely reduced prices if the UK crashed out of Europe with no-deal

Irish people will have duty-free shopping on UK trips under no-deal BrexitPassengers will able to buy alcohol and cigarettes at hugely reduced prices if the UK crashed out of Europe with no-deal



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11 September 2019, Wednesday News

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British government warns of Channel delays and electricity price hikes in no-deal planning document
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