Ireland fall just short of famous win over India

28/06/2022 23:33:00

Ireland fall just short of famous win over India

Ireland fall just short of famous win over India

Deepak Hooda century enough to spare the visitors’ blushes at Malahide

Mark Adair celebrates after dismissing India's Ishan Kishan. Photograph: Ben Whitley/InphoByNathan JohnsTue Jun 28 2022 - 21:26“For every punch they throw, we throw one back.” That was the message from Ireland captain Andrew Balbirnie heading into this second T20I against India.

Ireland took a lot of punches in the field, 104 of them in particular from Deepak Hooda but they threw plenty back of their own, falling just four runs short in defeat as a famous maiden victory against India slipped through their fingers in the last over.

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Ireland vs India second T20I - Ireland forced to play catch up but will be more competitivePreview: Ireland vs India second T20I - Ireland shook off some of the international rust through Harry Tector and Craig Young as they look for more to follow suit in Tuesday's second T20I. via IrishTimesSport

India see off Ireland in rain-affected T20This was the first match of a two-game series in Malahide.

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Expand Mark Adair celebrates after dismissing India's Ishan Kishan.Expand Craig Young had most of Ireland's success with the ball when taking advantage of the swinging conditions.Harry Tector was among the brightest for Ireland.Ireland v India – LevelUp11 Second Men's T20 International Photos 1.

Photograph: Ben Whitley/Inpho By Nathan Johns Tue Jun 28 2022 - 21:26 “For every punch they throw, we throw one back.” That was the message from Ireland captain Andrew Balbirnie heading into this second T20I against India.30pm, Malahide, live on BT Sport New season, new coach but it’s the same conversation for Ireland when it comes to playing the top teams. Ireland took a lot of punches in the field, 104 of them in particular from Deepak Hooda but they threw plenty back of their own, falling just four runs short in defeat as a famous maiden victory against India slipped through their fingers in the last over. The first match of a two-game series in Malahide was reduced to 12 overs per side due to a rain-delayed start. This game had it all: 446 total runs, 25 maximums, four dropped catches and even a dead ball off a kicked leg bye. There were positives in the result for Ireland no doubt; Harry Tector’s innings of 64 being the obvious one while Lorcan Tucker’s dismantling of Hardik Pandya and Conor Olphert’s economical response to seeing his first ball in international cricket launched out of the park can also be referenced. Not many T20 displays on these shores would come close to the treat offered up to a packed Malahide crowd.

Hooda started it off for India, notching a career best 104 off 57 balls as India threatened a score of 250 plus after winning the toss and choosing to bat. India’s players looked like they had been battle-hardened by a two-month stint in the world’s premier T20 domestic tournament, the IPL. However, Harry Tector’s 64 not out, aided by Lorcan Tucker’s 18 off 16 balls, at least allowed Ireland to set a respectable total. A death overs fightback led by Craig Young and Josh Little double strikes looked to be merely a case of damage limitation at the innings break as India ended on 225 for seven off their 20 overs. India's Deepak Hooda celebrates his century. Through no fault of the players, Ireland’s preparation continues to be worlds away from the competition at the top level. Photograph: by Paul Faith /AFPv ia Getty Images) (Paul Faith/Getty) Ireland would need something special to make this competitive, which is exactly what their batters pulled out of the bag. Hooda completed the job with back-to-back boundaries as India reached 111-3 with 16 balls to spare. After a powerplay misfire in the last outing, Paul Stirling in particular took the chase by the scruff of the neck, smashing Bhuvneshwar Kumar’s first over for 18 on his way to an 18-ball 40. We all know Andrew Balbirnie’s quality and record for his country, but after watching two in-swingers to Paul Stirling he looked genuinely surprised when Bhuvneshwar Kumar offered him an out-swinger.

Ireland’s powerplay effort of 73 for one was the third highest they’ve scored in T20Is. Once Stirling departed skipper Balbirnie took the reins, bludgeoning seven maximums on his way to a half-century. Bhuvneshwar Kumar caused Ireland plenty of problems with the ball in his first spell. He departed carving a wide delivery from Harshal Patel to deep point and despite Harry Tector, George Dockrell and Mark Adair taking the game deep, that one final boundary required off Umran Malik’s 20th over fialed to materialise. It truly was a bonkers game. At one point during the powerplay, TV graphics suggested that 84 per cent of Ireland’s deliveries were short or on a length, in other words not deliveries that would move in the air a great deal. Hooda and fellow half-centurion Sanju Samson found the boundary at will, punishing Ireland every time they dropped short.

Hooda was imperious over square leg and equally elegant driving down the ground - Ireland had no answers. “We were good for most of it but missed every now and then and were made to pay for that. Yet India stuttered in their last three overs. Hooda opted to take four singles to get to his century instead of staying aggressive, part of a wider malaise that saw the last three overs go for just 26 runs as Ireland snared five wickets. The noise of the Indian-dominated spectators can often be over-played, but it’s still true that Ireland aren’t tested in front of fervent atmospheres like that all too often. In response, all of Ireland’s threat initially came from one end - Stirling’s. Balbirnie’s first seven deliveries saw misses outside off, inside edges, balls thundering into the thigh; everything but the middle of the bat. Yet after starting slowly with both bat and ball in such a frenzied environment, Ireland showed they have the ability to pull things back and still compete - Tector reverse-sweeping leg stump full-tosses with the bat, Young taking two wickets in as many deliveries with the ball.

That was until Kumar offered a delivery on his pads that sailed over square-leg. One shot was all the skipper needed to find his range. Pity the series is so short and they won’t get a chance to keep doing so against India after Tuesday evening. From then it was largely a case of six or nothing. Shots over square-leg - India didn’t learn to not bowl short - fine leg and mid off brought further maximums. When his 50 came up in the 10th over, 44 of his runs had come via boundaries.

Andrew Balbirnie notched a half-century for Ireland. Photograph: Ben Whitley/Inpho (Ben Whitley/Inpho) India changed tack, and it worked. The trap was set for deliveries outside off, and Balbirnie fell into it as he picked out the deep man. Ireland always stayed within striking difference, though, as Tector anchored the rest of the chase, carving Ravi Bishnoi through point and and flicking Kumar through square leg. When he picked out long on with 18th, he left his side with a chance with 37 needed off 17 balls.

George Dockrell showed why he is Ireland’s finisher, peppering the boundary six times in an unbeaten knock of 34 with a strike-rate of 212. Mark Adair came in and launched arguably the biggest maximum of the day over square leg but one last Patel yorker left 17 required off the last. The Northern Knights man missed the first two deliveries off Malik’s last set, but a free-hit carved over extra and a nick over third brought the deficit into single figures. Malik had been poor earlier in his spell, ending up with an economy of over 10 but he nailed his yorker to Dockrell when it mattered and Adair couldn’t find the maximum required off the final delivery. Latest Stories .