How can your employer block a request to work from home?

Employers who refuse a request must identify why on the basis of ‘reasonable business grounds’

Social Affairs

25/01/2022 18:25:00

Employers who refuse a request must identify why on the basis of ‘reasonable business grounds’

Employers who refuse a request must identify why on the basis of ‘reasonable business grounds’

If employers refuse such requests they have to identify why on the basis of “reasonable business grounds”.And they may have to defend the reasons if the case is appealed to the Workplace Relations Commission (WRC).So what are the reasons your boss may use to refuse a request to work from home?

1. If the nature of the work does not allow for it to be done remotely;2. If the employer cannot reorganise work among existing staff;3. Where there is a potential negative impact on work quality;4. If there is a potential negative impact on performance;

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I love how the Irish media constantly focus on the welfare of office workers. This will have little or no relevance to people working on or near minimum wage. livingwage

The 13 reasons why employers can deny staff requests to work from homeLeo Varadkar published details of the new regulation which will be introduced in order to 'make better terms and conditions for workers a legacy of the pandemic'.

Remote working: Bill will require employers to have written policy on working from homeWorkers will be able to appeal if a request for remote working is refused by an employer terminology used will be vital here - as remote working, work from anywhere and home working (from a fixed address) have differing meanings and potential obligations Compelling employers to allow home working will provide a great incentive to have cheap labour abroad working ' from home' for companies....

Right to request remote working: Government reveals details of new legislation | NewstalkThe Government has revealed details of its planned legislation to give employees the right to request remote working - including 13 'reasonable business grounds' under which employers could refuse a request. Very nice brown coat. A birthday present? A man under a criminal investigation pontificates about legalities. Seems normal. What's he wearing. The gut can't dress to save his life.

Government rejects calls to introduce a right to work from homeProposed Bill would require employers to consider requests but can still refuse approval Means nothing then really does it? Of course they do. Once again looking like they are doing something without actually doing something. All decisions lie with employer, govt absolved of all responsibility Proof if any required, all decisions are political. Imagine the lowered carbon footprint we would enjoy,but no, not in the national interest. Crazy. WFH

The Government has unveiled plans to give people the right to request remote working. If employers refuse such requests they have to identify why on the basis of “reasonable business grounds”. And they may have to defend the reasons if the case is appealed to the Workplace Relations Commission (WRC). So what are the reasons your boss may use to refuse a request to work from home? 1. If the nature of the work does not allow for it to be done remotely; 2. If the employer cannot reorganise work among existing staff; 3. Where there is a potential negative impact on work quality; 4. If there is a potential negative impact on performance; 5. In cases where the employer has planned structural changes; 6. When there is a burden from additional costs, taking into account the financial and other costs entailed and the scale and financial resources of the employer’s business; 7. Where there are concerns about the protection of business confidentiality or intellectual property; 8. In instances where there are concerns about the suitability of the proposed workspace on health and safety grounds; 9. If there are concerns about the suitability of the proposed workspace on data protection grounds; 10. When there are concerns over the internet connectivity of the proposed remote working location; 11. If there is an inordinate distance between the proposed remote location and on-site location; 12. If the proposed remote working arrangement conflicts with the provisions of an applicable collective agreement; 13. In cases where there is an ongoing or recently concluded formal disciplinary processes. The Government has set out these 13 reasons in the draft legislation but also left open the possibility of other potential grounds for refusal. And if my employer says no? What then? People whose applications are refused will be able to make an appeal. Employers may have internal appeals processes and in those cases that will be the first place an appeal is made. Applicants whose workplaces don’t have an internal appeals process - or those whose internal appeal is refused - will be able to bring their case to the Workplace Relations Commission (WRC). Read More