U.K. clamps down to fight virus, but confusion still reigns

Covıd-19, Britain, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Herd İmmunity, Pandemic Response

U.K. clamps down to fight virus, but confusion still reigns

Covıd-19, Britain

24.3.2020

U.K. clamps down to fight virus, but confusion still reigns

Confusion rippled through Britain Tuesday, a day after Prime Minister Boris Johnson ordered a three-week halt to all non-essential activity to fight the spread of the new coronavirus.

Jill Lawless Published Tuesday, March 24, 2020 10:00AM EDT Last Updated Tuesday, March 24, 2020 12:55PM EDT SHARE LONDON -- Confusion rippled through Britain on Tuesday, a day after Prime Minister Boris Johnson ordered a three-week halt to all non-essential activity to fight the spread of the new coronavirus. Streets were empty but some subways were full. Hairdressers were closed but construction sites were open. Divorced parents wondered whether their children could continue to see them both. The government has ordered most stores to close, banned gatherings of more than two people who don't live together and told everyone apart from essential workers to leave home only to buy food and medicines or to exercise. "You must stay at home," Johnson said in a sombre address to the nation on Monday evening. Newsletter sign-up: Get The COVID-19 Brief sent to your inbox But even as the U.K. recorded its biggest single-day increase in COVID-19 deaths, photos showed crowded trains on some London subway lines on Tuesday, amid confusion about who was still allowed to go to work. As of Tuesday, Britain had 8,077 confirmed cases of COVID-19, and 422 deaths, 87 more deaths than a day earlier. Julia Harris, a London nurse, said her morning train to work was full. "I worry for my health more on my commute than actually being in the hospital," she said. Sporting goods chain Sports Direct said its shops would remain open, arguing that selling exercise equipment was an essential service. It reversed course after an outcry from the public and officials. Many building sites remained open, with construction workers among those crowding onto early-morning subways. Electrician Dan Dobson said construction workers felt "angry and unprotected," but felt they had to keep working. "None of them want to go to work, everyone is worried about taking it home to their families," he said. "But they still have bills to pay, they still have rent to pay, they still have to buy food." Authorities sent mixed messages. British Treasury chief Rishi Sunak defended keeping construction sites open, insisting it could be done safely. Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, however, said construction sites should close unless the building work was "essential." Some closed voluntarily. Construction was halted on London's huge Crossrail train project, and home builder Taylor Wimpey stopped work on all its sites. London Mayor Sadiq Khan implored employers: "Please support your staff to work from home unless it's absolutely necessary. Ignoring these rules means more lives lost." Many families were also confused by the new rules. After Johnson said people should not mingle outside of their household units, separated parents asked whether their children could still travel between their homes. Cabinet minister Michael Gove initially said children should not move between households, before clarifying that it was permitted. The restrictions are the most draconian ever imposed by a British government in peacetime. But they don't go as far as lockdowns in Italy and France, where people need a document authorizing their movements. The government said police would have powers to break up illegal gatherings and fine people who flout the rules. But some expressed doubts about whether the lockdown could be enforced. Britain has lost thousands of police officers during a decade of public spending cuts by Conservative-led governments. Johnson has promised to recruit 20,000 more police officers, but those efforts are still in the early stages. Unlike some other European countries, Britons do not carry ID cards, another factor complicating enforcement efforts. "There is no way really that the police can enforce this using powers. It has got to be because the public hugely support it," Peter Fahy, former chief constable of Greater Manchester Police, told the BBC. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever or coughing. But for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. Hospitals in Italy and Spain have been overwhelmed by the critically ill. Intensive care departments in London, the hardest-hit city, are being inundated with COVID-19 patients. Johnson warned that the National Health Service could be overwhelmed within weeks unless people took the lockdown seriously. Critics say British authorities have acted too slowly to avert an Italy-scale crisis. Schools were closed less than a week ago, and pubs and restaurants were only shuttered on Friday. Andrea Collins, Senior Clinical Lecturer in Respiratory Medicine at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, said the new restrictions were welcome but didn't go far enough. "I think we need permits across controlled areas to go to a workplace," she said. "Home working is hard for many but it is possible, we just need to adapt to a new way of being." ------ Associated Press writers Danica Kirka and Pan Pylas contributed to this story RELATED IMAGES view larger image Soldiers from Royal Logistics Corps delivering facemasks to St Thomas' Hospital in London, on March 24, 2020. (Dave Jenkins / MoD via AP) A sign at Heathrow Airport Terminal 5 arrivals warns of coronavirus, in London, England, on March 24, 2020. (Kirsty Wigglesworth / AP) Read more: CTV News

What does declaring a state of emergency mean for a city?Across Canada, cities are enacting states of emergency and acting swiftly to clamp down on activities that mayors and councils believe are violating the spirit of public-health officials’ warnings

Feds secure three flights to retrieve Canadians stuck in PeruThe federal government has secured authorizations for three flights to bring home Canadians stuck in Peru, where the government is clamping down to slow the spread of COVID-19 . Well done Can they get from places like mancora, cuzco or trujillo to get to Lima? What is happening there? These flights obviously arent happening from every city. Hey gasbag PeterMacKay, what will you complain about today? Come on man, you know you can find SOMETHING.

CTV National News: No chance to say goodbyeSean Leathong reports on Mubarak Popat, a man who died where his daughter and son-in-law are fighting the virus on the front lines. CTVSean I hope it spreads throughout your entire network.

Coronavirus: UN chief calls for global ceasefire in conflicts to fight COVID-19The U.N. chief said: 'It is time to put armed conflict on lock down and focus together on the true fight of our lives.'

Rosie O'Donnell's streaming Broadway show raises US$600KRosie O'Donnell's streaming Broadway charity show has raised over US$600,000 for virus victims. I'm sorry, how much has the Cheeto in Chief personally raised again? I think he donated $100,000 but he claims it cost him BILLIONS of dollars to get to the White House... Narrator: $579,000 of the money was just to get them to stop. That is all she could raise with all her multi millionaire Hollywood buddies

Five people to listen to during coronavirus outbreak — and five to ignoreCoronavirus confusion? You're not alone. Here's who to pay attention to and who to ignore. Hint: don't listen to Global Global is the Trudeau liberal propaganda fake news network Hint: Don’t listen to the Chinese communist Bureau of Propaganda. Is that your ONLY source for “news”, Global?



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