Review: Alphonse: Wajdi Mouawad’s naive, but moving solo show about unchosen change brings in-person theatre back to Toronto

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Alphonse: Wajdi Mouawad’s naive, but moving solo show about unchosen change brings in-person theatre back to Toronto

Even in his lesser plays, Wajdi Mouawad always manages to write a line that plants itself in your mind, takes root and grows in meaning the more you water and fertilize it through memory., a 1996 solo show about the unchosen change of adolescence by the Lebanese-Quebecois playwright.The one-person show is being performed outdoors in a Toronto park by two people: Alon Nashman and Kaleb Alexander, in alternating performances.

Mouawad braids together two strands of story in this highly symbolic play about a 14-year-old named Alphonse who goes missing one day, and gets lost somewhere between childhood and adulthood. The symbolic nature of Alphonse, both the character and the play, is accentuated in the performance delivered by Nashman, whom I saw in the afternoon on Thursday.

By contrast, Alexander’s performance had a hiccup or two, but was full of discovery and feeling. I preferred the sensitivity he brought to his depiction of the parade of minor characters, too.

Source: Entertainment Trends (entertainmenttrends.net)

 

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