International, Bahamas, Hurricane Dorian, Wreckage, Category 5 Storm, Post Storm Destruction, People, Home, Nassau, Abaco

International, Bahamas

Hurricane Dorian survivors struggle pick up the pieces in the Bahamas

Hurricane Dorian survivors struggle pick up the pieces in the Bahamas

10.9.2019

Hurricane Dorian survivors struggle pick up the pieces in the Bahamas

The struggle to start a new life in a Bahamas devastated by the strongest hurricane on record begins for the traumatized citizens

Audio for this article is not available at this time. This translation has been automatically generated and has not been verified for accuracy. Open this photo in gallery Randy Nagy, center, talks with firefighters arriving from the city of Miami to help those affected by Hurricane Dorian while his wife Silvia, 63, goes out the door of his destroyed house in Pelican Point, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. The American couple retired to Pelican Point, Bahamas 3 years ago, had been traveling to the Bahamas for years and had lived through several storms, including Hurricane Francis. They never imagined that their lives 'work would be destroyed in an instant with the passing of Hurricane Dorian. Ramon Espinosa/The Associated Press Thousands of hurricane survivors are filing off boats and planes in the capital of the Bahamas, facing the need to start new lives after Hurricane Dorian but with little ideas on how or where to begin. Some sat in hotel lobbies as they debated their next steps. Others were bused to shelters jammed to capacity. Some got rides from friends or family who offered a temporary place to stay on New Providence, an island of some 13,000 residents that has never seen so many people arrive on its shores in recent history. Carla Ferguson, a 51-year-old resident of Treasure Cay, walked out of a small airport in Nassau with her daughter and other relatives late Monday afternoon and looked around as the sun set. Story continues below advertisement “We don’t know where we’re going to stay,” she said. “We don’t know.” Ferguson and her family had one large duffel bag and three plastic storage boxes, most of them stuffed with donated clothes they received before leaving their tiny, devastated island. “No one deserves to go through this,” said her daughter, 30-year-old Dimple Lightbourne, blinking away tears. The government has estimated that up to 10,000 people from the Abaco islands alone, including Treasure Cay, will need food, water and temporary housing as officials consider setting up tent or container cities while they clear the country’s ravaged northern region of debris so people can eventually return. Getting back to Abaco is the dream of Betty Edmond, a 43-year-old cook who picked at some fries Monday night while with her son and husband in a restaurant at a Nassau hotel, where her nephew is paying for their stay. They arrived in Nassau on Saturday night after a six-hour boat trip from Abaco and plan to fly to South Florida on Wednesday, thanks to plane tickets bought by friends who will provide them a temporary home until they can find jobs. But the goal is to return, Edmond said. “Home will always be home,” she said. “Every day you wish you could go back.” Story continues below advertisement Story continues below advertisement “You try to keep your hopes up, but …,” she added, her voice trailing off as she shook her head. The upheaval, however, was exciting to her 8-year-old son, Kayden Monestime, who said he was looking forward to going to a mall, McDonald’s and Foot Locker. Instead of starting school Monday, as had been scheduled before the Category 5 storm hit, Monestime spent the day accompanying his parents to the bank and a shelter as they prepared for the move to the U.S. Also flying to Florida was 41-year-old Shaneka Russell, who owned Smacky’s Takeaway, a takeout restaurant known for its cracked conch that opened in 2005 and was named after the noises her son made as a baby. Russell’s mother once ran the place, which was destroyed by Dorian. On Monday, she sat in a white plastic chair under a white plastic tarp as she waited for her 13-year-old son to arrive from Abaco. Russell said good Samaritans had taken her and a group of people into their home over the weekend and found them a hotel room in Nassau for a couple of days. Story continues below advertisement “To know that we were going to a hotel, with electricity and air conditioning and a proper shower, I cried,” she said. “I’ve never been through anything like this in my life.” Dorian slammed into Great Abaco and Grand Bahama islands a week ago as one of the strongest Atlantic hurricanes ever, killing at least 44 people, with emergency workers saying they expect to find more victims. Members of the Gainesville, Florida, fire department were checking the ruins of The Mudd, the Bahamas’ largest Haitian immigrant community on Great Abaco. “We’ve probably hit at most one-tenth of this area, and so far we found five human remains,” said Joseph Hillhouse, assistant chief of Gainesville Fire Rescue. “I would say based off of our sample size, we’re going to see more.” After U.S. teams recovered some bodies, Bahamas police and medical authorities moved in to conduct autopsies and fly the bodies south to Nassau. “There are still more bodies,” said Genoise Arnold, a resident of The Mudd, who knew of at least three neighbours killed during the storm. Story continues below advertisement Arnold said one neighbour clung to a tree during Dorian and succumbed to flood waters that surged through the low-lying neighbourhood. Others were caught under their homes when winds turned the structures into splinters, leaving the cowering residents exposed, he said. The huge debris piles left by the storm are challenging for search and recovery teams, which cannot use bulldozers or other heavy equipment to search for the dead. That makes recovery and identification a slow process. At least five deaths have been blamed on the storm in the southeastern United States and one in Puerto Rico. Lightbourne, the Abaco resident now in Nassau, said she couldn’t wait to escape the disaster Dorian left behind. “I don’t want to see the Bahamas for a while. It’s stressful,” she said. “I want to go to America. …This is a new chapter. I’ve ripped all the pages out. Just give me a new book to fill out.” Related Read more: The Globe and Mail

Hurricane survivors struggle to start new life in BahamasThousands of hurricane survivors are filing off boats and planes in the capital of the Bahamas , facing the need to start new lives after Hurricane Dorian but with little ideas on how or where to begin. Hard to start a new life when one's total life is a tent and camp stove, or life in a shelter. Tell Trump to stay out of the Bahamas ,they don’t need paper towels ,they need help !

CTV National News: Desperation in the Bahamas.TomWaltersCTV reports on the desperation to escape the Bahamas after the devastation from Hurricane Dorian : TomWaltersCTV prayin for my dawgz 🙏🏾 TomWaltersCTV Damn. Once upon a time it was the other islands

Mother wants body of daughter killed in Dorian returned to CanadaThe mother of a Canadian citizen killed when Hurricane Dorian hit the Bahamas is asking the federal government for help in bringing her daughter's body back to Canada. First off, what about the husband? He doesn’t get the child he’s been helping raise? Secondly, as sad and disgusting as it is, let the people get the living out first so more people don’t die. Seriously stop posting the same news story over and over again! And what about the $40000 GoFundMe. Maybe that money should be given to the husband who lost a wife so he can continue to care for his step-son.

Rain on your wedding day? Halifax couple gets married despite DorianThe beaming couple had just gotten married on Saturday, in the face of Hurricane Dorian -- a major storm that made landfall in Nova Scotia after devastating the Bahamas . GlobalNational Love conquers all! GlobalNational Love is love, weather cannot interfere!! Some people really missed the 'if anyone has a problem with this marriage please come forward now' part of the ceremony.

NOTEBOOK: Facing the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian in the BahamasIn the wake of Hurricane Dorian , Global News' Mike Drolet travels to one of the hardest-hit areas in the Bahamas to hear the stories of those affected by the storm.

Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas, but some are stayingNearly a week after HurricaneDorian devastated Abaco island, survivors of the storm sift through the damage left behind. Global News' Mike Drolet reports. READ MORE: GlobalNational 😢Prayers for all affected. I hope you get all the help you so obviously need. Carabeans will never be paradise ! It' s not finished for the other Islands in the Carabean , the climate change is giving the result forcasted for long Time ! Wow 😮 Devistaring. Stay safe MDroletGlobalTV



Puppy that can’t walk befriends pigeon that can’t fly — and it’s adorable

Which Maple Leafs goalie should start Thursday vs. the Penguins? - Sportsnet.ca

Venezuelan elections key to ending political crisis, Colombian envoy to Canada says

Roll Up the Rim 2020: Tim Hortons slashes contest while pushing app ‘rolls’

Canadian couples still follow traditional roles when it comes to chores, StatCan says

Canadiens' playoff hopes dealt fatal blow by last-place Red Wings - Sportsnet.ca

Neil Young blasts Trump for 'short-term thinking' and using his music

Write Comment

Thank you for your comment.
Please try again later.

Latest News

News

10 September 2019, Tuesday News

Previous news

Oakland Raiders beat Denver Broncos 24-16 in 1st game after Brown’s release

Next news

India locates missing Moon lander
The RCMP needs your help naming their new puppies | CBC News ‘Critical’ propane shortage in Quebec forces companies to ration supplies Will news of RCMP departure lift Ontario rail blockade as it enters 15th day? Government will continue to give out new licence plates despite admitting they're defective Ted Morton: Trudeau’s nightmare comes true as he’s forced to choose between climate activists and national unity Pigeons in tiny MAGA hats take flight for pro-Trump stunt in Las Vegas Wet’suwet’en members speak in favour of Coastal GasLink pipeline This California university will give free tuition to students with US$80K or less family income Why are so many big retail stores closing? Experts weigh in Watch Live: Oilers GM Ken Holland addresses media after practice - Sportsnet.ca Canadians can lose Nexus passes over legal cannabis use in Canada: U.S. document B.C. premier says cancelling Coastal GasLink pipeline is ‘not an option for me’
Puppy that can’t walk befriends pigeon that can’t fly — and it’s adorable Which Maple Leafs goalie should start Thursday vs. the Penguins? - Sportsnet.ca Venezuelan elections key to ending political crisis, Colombian envoy to Canada says Roll Up the Rim 2020: Tim Hortons slashes contest while pushing app ‘rolls’ Canadian couples still follow traditional roles when it comes to chores, StatCan says Canadiens' playoff hopes dealt fatal blow by last-place Red Wings - Sportsnet.ca Neil Young blasts Trump for 'short-term thinking' and using his music Opinion: The RCMP’s involvement in the Wet’suwet’en blockades crisis puts Indigenous women at risk Conservatives open door to advancing first non-confidence motion Conservatives back away from non-confidence motion, for now Three people charged after 11-year-old gives birth in Missouri bathtub 'We need to be patient': Indigenous leaders call for dialogue amid rail blockades