Actor Prince Amponsah talks Station Eleven and the ‘everyday challenge’ of living with trauma

2022-01-29 5:35:00 AM

Prince Amponsah hasn’t let a devastating fire that led to the loss of both hands deter him from an acting career, joining the cast of HBO Max series Station Eleven in a recurring role.

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Prince Amponsah hasn’t let a devastating fire that led to the loss of both hands deter him from an acting career, joining the cast of HBO Max series Station Eleven in a recurring role.

Prince Amponsah hasn’t let a devastating fire that led to the loss of both hands deter him from an acting career, joining the cast of HBO Max series Station Eleven in a recurring role.

JOIN THE CONVERSATIONPrince Amponsah was badly scarred and lost both hands in a devastating house fire a decade ago. But he hasn’t lost his love of acting as he forges ahead with his career.Amponsah, 36, relishes his latest role on the HBO Max limited series Station Eleven, which premiered in December. Adapted from the award-winning novel by Canadian author Emily St. John Mandel, the series is centred in a world decimated by a swine flu pandemic, with a storyline shifting between past and future. (The show has an enviable 98 per cent critics rating and 73 per cent audience score on Rotten Tomatoes.)

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Article was updated 4 hrs ago JOIN THE CONVERSATION Prince Amponsah was badly scarred and lost both hands in a devastating house fire a decade ago.Entertainment Disney responds to Peter Dinklage's Snow White criticism Walt Disney Co.Social Sharing.He was 78.

But he hasn’t lost his love of acting as he forges ahead with his career. Amponsah, 36, relishes his latest role on the HBO Max limited series Station Eleven, which premiered in December. Social Sharing Spokesperson says company is now 'taking a different approach' to Snow White remake Thomson Reuters · Posted: Jan 26, 2022 3:38 PM ET | Last Updated: January 26 Peter Dinklage attends the 71st Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on Sept. Adapted from the award-winning novel by Canadian author Emily St. John Mandel, the series is centred in a world decimated by a swine flu pandemic, with a storyline shifting between past and future. After Dinklage criticized the new Snow White remake, Disney shared that it is 'taking a different approach' on the classic tale. (The show has an enviable 98 per cent critics rating and 73 per cent audience score on Rotten Tomatoes. He was working as a waiter when he landed his first film role in "The South's Shark" in 1978.

) He actor plays August, a member of the Travelling Symphony, which brings the joy of stage performance to a world bereft of culture. He’s also a confidant to Kirsten, who was a child when the plague first arrived. “I really enjoyed the character of August. The Travelling Symphony, which he’s a member of, comes across a lot of experiences, a lot of difficult times as well as good times. August tries to find the positive and holds the group together in a lot of ways,” Amponsah said.

“I just loved his relationship with the main character, Kirsten (played by Mackenzie Davis) as long-time friends as well as the fact that it was about a pandemic within a pandemic, life imitating art imitating life. I thought that would be a neat challenge. It’s more than just a pandemic story in my opinion,” Amponsah said. Some changes have made in the adaptation from book to television, including Amponsah’s role with the collaboration of writer/producer Patrick Somerville, who adapted the novel. “In the book, (August) is not a person with a disability so a lot of things were tweaked.

Patrick Somerville had a lot of conversations with me just to bring a little more authenticity to the character,” Amponsah said. Since his recovery, Amponsah has landed roles in Killjoys and The Handmaid’s Tale as well as theatre and is collaborating with long-time friend Viktor Lukawski as part of a two-year residency at the Theatre Centre on Queen St. W. exploring the art of puppetry. In the fall, he’ll play Creon in a Winnipeg production of Greek tragedy Antigone.

Arriving from Ghana with his family as an infant, Amponsah grew up in Mississauga after a short stay in Montreal. After performing in high school productions, he pursued acting at the George Brown Theatre School. “Of course I had my parents saying, ‘do you have any backup plans?’ It’s been my road ever since,” he said. After the fire in 2012 at his walk-up apartment on Queen St. W.

, Amponsah endured two years of rehabilitation along with a lot of soul-searching. “I do have to say (acting) wasn’t in my mind all the time during recovery. I definitely had moments of ‘oh geez, I don’t know if this is for me anymore. Do I want to be seen like this? Do I want to put myself out there in this new body?’” Amponsah said. “And then I started to question: ‘well, why not, right?’ It’s also then to challenge people as well as to what they see and what they’re used to.

The fact is there are about 15 to 20 per cent of people living with disability in the world so why shouldn’t I be seen on the screen or on stage?” he added. RELATED STORIES .