What the election means to sharemarkets

In the 14 elections since 1983, the average return of the market during the five-week campaign leading to election day is 1.7 per cent.

19/04/2022 4:39:00 AM

In the 14 elections since 1983, the average return of the market during the five-week campaign leading to election day is 1.7 per cent.

In the 14 elections since 1983, the average return of the market during the five-week campaign leading to election day is 1.7 per cent.

Obviously, we enter thisBoth campaigns are focused on spending rather solving the bottlenecks in a time where inflation, supply issues, productivity and labour force problems could hinder our development long after polling day.On average the All Ordinaries performs well in both the lead-up to and after an election. In the 14 elections since 1983, the average return of the market during the five-week campaign leading to election day is 1.74 per cent.

Party leadership changes can have an effectPleasingly, there have only been two periods where markets were negative both in the lead-up to and after an election. The 1990 election was won back on the hopes of a large surplus fuelled by rampant asset value growth, which by September quickly deteriorated into the “recession we had to have”.

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