What Australia can learn from New Zealand about signing a treaty with its Indigenous peoples

5/02/2021 11:00:00 PM

As New Zealanders reflect on what their upcoming national day means to them, SBS News looks at what Australia can learn from our closest neighbours.

Waitangiday

As New Zealanders mark WaitangiDay and reflect on what their national day means to them, SBS News looks at what Australia can learn from our closest neighbours.

As New Zealanders reflect on what their upcoming national day means to them, SBS News looks at what Australia can learn from our closest neighbours.

On the 6th of February, 1840, representatives of the British crown and 540 Māori rangatira signed the treaty, in a bid to align the Māori people and the new British colonists.Associate Professor O'Sullivan, an expert in Indigenous policy, said that around the time of its signing, violence between British settlers and First Nations' peoples was at its peak in Australia.

Written in both Māori and English, the Treaty of Waitangi contains three articles, considered a set of broad principles in which the Māori and British agreed to build a government.“So although the Māori text was presented to the people who signed it as a translation of the English text, in fact it wasn't a translation, it was a different version using very different language.”

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The Maori fought hard for their land and deserved to be treated with respect. The Aborigines were utterly decimated, therefor deserve nothing The maori men dont allow woman to speak pubically on a marae so new zealand needs to learn from australia. The problem is that the Maoris had defined areas of land with boundaries, compared to Australian indigenous. So attempting to compare to two shows a lack of insight.