Liam and Sofia noticed more targeted ads after COVID remote learning. Experts say it may not be a coincidence

25/05/2022 4:29:00 AM

Liam and Sofia noticed more targeted ads after COVID remote learning. Experts say it may not be a coincidence

Education, Tech

Liam and Sofia noticed more targeted ads after COVID remote learning. Experts say it may not be a coincidence

A global study into the murky world of student data during COVID-19 lockdowns finds more than 4 million Australian school students were at risk of unprecedented tracking and surveillance during remote learning.

Several products used in Australia were found sharing children's data with advertisersDespite international privacy obligations, the products requested access to students' contacts and locations and monitored their keystrokes. The data was sent to nearly 200 ad-technology companies.

Specialist.Team@abc.net.auThe products of concernThe Adobe Connect app is often used for screen sharing and web conferencing.A software development toolkit (SDK) was also detected, which allowed Google to access the same data in real time."The big tech companies like us to believe that any kind of regulation is going to break their products and break the internet, but there is a range of sensible, reasonable, appropriate regulations that we can introduce," Mr Cooper said.

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An unfortunate illustration of why privacy-by-design is urgently needed for digital platforms along with rules about how data can be used for targeted marketing. Sadly, companies selling harmful and addictive products access this type of data to drive their products into homes.

Why experts fear only a fraction of COVID-19 cases are being reportedAustralia has the highest per capita rate of COVID-19 infections of any comparable country in the world, but pathologists fear they do not have the full picture. 7NEWS Here we go sunriseon7 People are over all the Covid stuff. Non serious infections/symptoms are likely going unreported. Those needing tests for work etc are still being captured regularly. ONLY because the rest of the world had it 2 YEARS AGO 🙄🙄🙄🙄

Albanese seeks briefing on COVID-19 ‘step-up’ as experts push for fourth jabThe new PM has directed the Health Department to prepare a briefing on COVID-19 as one of his first agenda items after returning from Japan. Dana_Adele Experts clinging to power grab. Dana_Adele I'm very pleased to read this. The current situation with covid is not sustainable. Hopefully people have had their fill of trying to 'live with it' by ignoring it and all getting sick, and we can use more intelligent methods to reduce death and disease. Dana_Adele God speed, AlboMP

Albanese seeks briefing on COVID-19 ‘step-up’ as experts push for fourth jabPrime Minister Anthony Albanese has directed the Health Department to prepare a briefing on COVID-19 as one of his first agenda items upon returning from meetings in Japan. auspol COVID COVID19 COVID19Vic No human rights lawyers? This says a lot. Uh oh at least let the people work from home who can don't force them to come on work site by force

‘How convenient’: South Australia ends COVID state of emergencyThe former PM did that himself when he botched quarantine, botched getting vaccines, botched the vaccine roll-out, favoured NSW over every other state then took all the credit Yeah, coz he cocked up and dodged the vaccine rollout, aged care, and quarantine issue spectacularly. Scomo wedged himself firmly with his incompetent response to COVID

AFL crowds slump to lowest levels in 26 years, excluding COVID seasonsWhile it would be unrealistic to expect attendances to bounce back to pre-pandemic levels, crowds in 2022 are, on average, at their lowest since 1996, when fewer than 30,000 people per match attended the footy. Covid and footy are not a great mix.. Bread & circuses Absolute bottom line; way too much footy on tv. 4/7 and 3/7 days footy is live on tv. Much of it free. You can only enjoy so much vanilla slice before enough is enough. And the live experience is a manufactured sterile theatre event. The tribalism passion is much diminished.

Covid can cause ongoing damage to heart, lungs and kidneys, study findsOne in eight Covid hospital patients have heart inflammation up to two months later, researchers find biosensors LongCovid Effective digital healthcare monitors serum levels of protective nocturnal melatonin, circulating short-chain fatty acids, toxic gut microbiota metabolites, vitamin D from sunlight, polyphenols, alpha-tocopherol and minerals from nuts and seeds. .

More than 4 million Australian school students were at risk of unprecedented tracking and surveillance during remote learning as corporations exploited their access to children.public health responses and assess the impact of treatments and vaccines.Full election results Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has directed the Health Department to prepare a briefing on COVID-19 as one of his first agenda items upon returning from meetings in Japan, as health experts push for wider access to fourth vaccine doses.Full election results Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has directed the Health Department to prepare a briefing on COVID-19 as one of his first agenda items upon returning from meetings in Japan, as health experts push for wider access to fourth vaccine doses.

Key points: Human Rights Watch analysed 164 educational apps and websites used in 49 countries It found 89 per cent of EdTech products used globally could put children's privacy at risk Several products used in Australia were found sharing children's data with advertisers The findings come from the most comprehensive global study into the murky world of student data during COVID-19 lockdowns, and the privacy risks for both students and their families as education shifted from schools to homes. The global advocacy group Human Rights Watch (HRW) analysed 164 educational apps and websites used in 49 countries, running tests on the code and attempting to track where the data of hundreds of millions of children worldwide ended up. Most are probably still self-isolating,” Keighley told AAP. The HRW findings show that 89 per cent of the educational technology, or "EdTech", products used globally could put children's privacy at risk. Credit: AP Professor Greg Dore from the University of NSW’s Kirby Institute said Albanese should consider expanding access to fourth doses of COVID-19 vaccines, currently approved only for severely immunocompromised people, those aged 65 and over and First Nations people aged 50 and over. Despite international privacy obligations, the products requested access to students' contacts and locations and monitored their keystrokes. Pathologists fear they haven’t got the full picture. The data was sent to nearly 200 ad-technology companies. “Albanese should be saying to ATAGI: ‘What is the best scientific advice about reducing the impact on the hospital system’?” the health economist said.

Parents and schools had little choice but to adopt these products to ensure their children kept up with classmates. Credit: AAP But she said a PCR test was helpful to distinguish if the patient also suffered from concurrent influenza - which could be tested for on the same PCR. Loading The United States recently made fourth doses available to everyone aged 50 and over. Opting out could mean repeating a year. In Australia, it is alleged a number of companies did not meet the promises made in their privacy statements. “When you are unwell, reporting your positive test may not seem like a priority, but it is so important to take the time to do so. Do you know more about this story? Email Specialist. Advertisement “Our third dose rates have languished,” she said.Team@abc.”. “But there’s been no effort.

net.au ABC News shared the findings with students in years 11 and 12 at a Sydney school where the products were used. We don’t see any health promotion. "It's pretty shocking," said year 12 student Liam, whose last name has been withheld for privacy reasons. "When you're at school, you have the right to feel protected and feel safe. And school ensures that you're protected and safe.5 million people – almost a third – have not had a booster, including more than 11,470 aged care residents and 191,000 First Nations people.5 million people – almost a third – have not had a booster, including more than 11,470 aged care residents and 191,000 First Nations people.

So to have this going on, you don't expect it." The products of concern The HRW investigation began a year after remote learning began in March 2021 — well beyond the first chaotic months of the pandemic. Many Australian schools were still using the Adobe Connect app for videoconferencing and screen sharing. Loading He said it was unclear how many of the people most vulnerable to COVID-19 – such as aged care residents – were being given access to antiviral drugs Paxlovid and Lagevrio, which studies show can reduce the chance of hospitalisation or death by up to 80 per cent. The application had access to students' cameras and microphones, and HRW identified code allowing it to collect phone numbers. The Adobe Connect app is often used for screen sharing and web conferencing. Monash University infectious diseases Professor Allen Cheng said any change to the federal government’s COVID-19 strategy should aim to protect under-vaccinated groups and mitigate effects on hospitals through clear public health messaging.

( ABC News: Danielle Bonica ) A software development toolkit (SDK) was also detected, which allowed Google to access the same data in real time. While the public was no longer willing to tolerate mask mandates, he said, information campaigns could encourage voluntary mask wearing – particularly in high-risk settings – and convince people to come forward for a vaccine or booster. Chris Cooper, the Executive Director of Reset Australia, said tech companies like Adobe had "opaque" business models and were not subject to the same regulations as other companies operating in Australia. "Teachers, students and parents are left really in the dark with what's happening with the data the company is collecting on young people," he said. ABC News engaged Mr Cooper for expert technical analysis and independent review of the HRW findings. “We need to continue to be vigilant and recognise that this pandemic is still having a real human impact,” he said. Reset Australia is part of a global, apolitical advocacy group pushing policy solutions to data privacy issues as well as countering digital threats to democracy. The Morning Edition newsletter is our guide to the day’s most important and interesting stories, analysis and insights.

"The big tech companies like us to believe that any kind of regulation is going to break their products and break the internet, but there is a range of sensible, reasonable, appropriate regulations that we can introduce," Mr Cooper said. Chris Cooper says tougher privacy rules should apply to tech companies. ( ABC News: Conor Duffy ) Adobe made clear in its privacy policy that it uses users' personal data to target them with behavioural advertising and that data is shared with third parties. Adobe was approached for comment but declined, citing an unpublished response to HRW. Another global giant After Microsoft spent $US2.

5 billion ($3.5 billion) purchasing the popular Minecraft adventure game, it leveraged its investment by creating a new education spin-off, Minecraft: Education Edition. The purchase came just before remote learning — a once in a lifetime opportunity to push the product as schools relied on software rather than teachers. But HRW has accused the company of breaching its privacy policy, which reassured parents with promises that it would not collect or use children's personal data for non-educational purposes. MineCraft has a popular Education Edition spin-off which is used in many schools.

( ABC News: Danielle Bonica ) The investigation found code in the app making it possible to track children's precise locations and times they were at those locations, as well as embedding seven SDKs which gave other giant corporations like Google, Twitter and Facebook the same access. "We know that the tracking built into these apps is very comprehensive and collecting a wide range of data, including real-time GPS location data, as well as information sometimes from the contact lists on people's phones. As well as things like who they're hanging out with, where they go to school," Mr Cooper said. A Microsoft spokesman declined to address questions about the discrepancies in its privacy policy but said the company was investigating further. "We take reports of this nature seriously and are investigating these allegations: however, Human Rights Watch has not provided sufficient information on the configurations they tested for us to verify their findings.

We're reaching out to them to get more information so that we can conduct any further investigation needed," a Microsoft spokesperson said. The local company A smaller company that started in New Zealand is among those seeking a future in the rapidly expanding EdTech industry. It is accused, though, of violating its own privacy policies. Education Perfect: Science, an online learning platform, is used around the world. The HRW analysis detected ad trackers on the Education Perfect: Science site.

( ABC News: Danielle Bonica ) The global private equity giant Kohlberg Kravis Roberts purchased a majority stake in June last year in a deal that valued the company at $US318.82 million. In Australia, the educational product is in fact licensed to a company called EPL Marketing Services Pty Ltd. Despite the company's pledge to protect student data, the HRW analysis shows the presence of ad trackers from Google and Facebook. It also shows keystroke logging was used to monitor students' work and send it to a third-party American company.

"The parents, teachers and students that are using this platform will have signed a privacy policy consent form that neglects to talk about the 11 or so trackers that the report identified that is collecting a wide range of data on these young people," Mr Cooper said. .