Curve serve and forehand slice: How Dylan Alcott has dominated his sport

. @TennisAustralia’s national high-performance wheelchair coach, Francois Vogelsberger explains how @DylanAlcott has stayed ahead of pack. | @scottspits

27/01/2022 3:28:00 AM

. TennisAustralia’s national high-performance wheelchair coach, Francois Vogelsberger explains how DylanAlcott has stayed ahead of pack. | scottspits

Tennis Australia’s high-performance wheelchair coach, Francois Vogelsberger, explains the weapons that have made Dylan Alcott a 15-time grand slam champion in quad singles and eight-time winner in the doubles.

“If you see the able-bodied players, they use a lot of the legs to create the momentum [for the kick serve]. In wheelchair tennis it’s way harder and the kick serve doesn’t have enough pace and gives your opponent too much time.“It’s very accurate, which he does with the flat serve as well.”

“When he started his forehand was his weakness, but he’s been working a lot on it,” Vogelsberger said.“One of the reasons I think is because they are lower on the ground and are more likely to hit the ball high.“Those guys hit a lot of balls above their head, so this grip allows them to generate more topspin and pace as well.”

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Dylan Alcott named Australian of the YearThe tennis champion and golden slam winner is the first person with a disability to receive the national honour in its 62-year history. Lol why

Dylan Alcott says he’s an ‘emotional mess’ after being named Australian of the YearTennis champion DylanAlcott has been named Australian of the Year 2022. The Paralympic gold medallist and passionate disability advocate was given the honour in a ceremony in Canberra overnight. Rob7Scott 7NEWS

Australian Open live: Dylan Alcott makes it through to an eighth consecutive final.DylanAlcott has made it through to an eighth consecutive Quad Wheelchair Singles final at the AustralianOpen after beating long-time rival lapstar11 6-3, 6-0 in their semifinal. AusOpen 7NEWS

Dylan Alcott makes 62-year history as Australian of the YearMultiple tennis Grand Slam champion and disability advocate Dylan Alcott took a brief moment to make a joke at his own expense in front of a star-studded crowd after he was named the 2022 Australian of the Year. Inspired choice who will inspire others. Will make such a wonderful change from the last hate spewing victim. Bravo. 👏👏👏

Praise pours in for Dylan Alcott after being named Australian of the YearSports stars and disability advocates are applauding Dylan Alcott after he was named the first-ever Australian of the Year with a visible disability. When Labor came up with the NDIS it was supposed to be paid for with an increase in the Medicare levy. Tony Abbott scrapped the levy and left the NDIS without funding. Thank you for updating your reporting and correcting the error in claiming Dylan was the first disabled winner outright. It's still not the wording I would have chosen but at least you're not erasing Grace Tames autism now.

Dylan Alcott named Australian of the YearParalympian and disability advocate Dylan Alcott has been named the 2022 Australian of the Year. Really hoped someone who had worked their butt off during the pandemic and helped save lives be the one who was named Cool! Good work Dylan. Don’t let Scumo get you down Fantastic! 👏👏👏 well done DylanAlcott 👏👏👏

“His serve is a big weapon – power, speed but also curve,” said Vogelsberger. Advertisement “He can do like a slight curve towards the left. Not a kick serve. A kick serve is a little bit difficult [for wheelchair athletes] because the motion is a little bit high. “If you see the able-bodied players, they use a lot of the legs to create the momentum [for the kick serve]. In wheelchair tennis it’s way harder and the kick serve doesn’t have enough pace and gives your opponent too much time. “With Dylan ... he can put it out wide. Like you saw against [left-hander] Andy Lapthorne [in his semi-final], it was one of the tactics to start really wide on Andy’s backhand. “He can do also the left one where the ball arrives, for example, on Andy’s forehand and curve back into the body. “It’s very accurate, which he does with the flat serve as well.” The slice forehand Ashleigh Barty is renowned for her backhand slice – Jim Courier said this week Barty’s key weapon was reminiscent of Roger Federer – but for Alcott, he has added the forehand version to his armory. “When he started his forehand was his weakness, but he’s been working a lot on it,” Vogelsberger said. “He used to use the slice forehand as a ‘safety mode’ [a defensive option] back in the days, and now he uses it as a weapon. “You can keep the ball lower, the ball is travelling sideways [a sidespin shot] … compared to the topspin backhand – then the ball will go high. “One of the reasons I think is because they are lower on the ground and are more likely to hit the ball high. Vogelsberger is also a big fan of Alcott’s cross-court backhand. “[And the] backhand topspin – the inverted backhand with a semi-western grip,” he said. “Those guys hit a lot of balls above their head, so this grip allows them to generate more topspin and pace as well.” Endurance Vogelsberger says stamina is Alcott’s “main strength”. “He’s working extremely hard at the gym [and] pushing sessions. To be honest he’s had very, very few injuries. Which I think is amazing after those seven years. We don’t exactly know how that happened, but it happened. Good for us.” Vogelsberger said the time away playing a team sport was ideal for him. Dylan Alcott with his seventh consecutive Australian Open title. Credit: Getty Images “He’s been playing basketball, so that had a massive positive impact on his fitness, and his recovery,” he said. “The fact that he can hit ball, after ball, after ball, it’s very difficult for the other players to pass him because he’s very fast.” Problem-solving, building momentum Vogelsberger says one of the main challenges for wheelchair athletes is building momentum in a point, especially after serving. “What is making him very strong is he never stops on the tennis court. “You start from a still position, you serve, the second shot after the serve you’re not moving too fast because you come out from the serve. “But after that second shot you start moving the chair and you never stop. What is hard in wheelchair tennis is that first or second push to bring the chair to momentum, but when the momentum is there and you carry the momentum through the shot and to prepare the next shot, then everything is easier. Alcott’s capacity to solve problems on the court was tested when he went a set down against another Dutchman, Niels Vink, . “[It was] not his best match in regards to the quality of tennis he played,” Vogelsberger said. “There’s a lot of pressure, a lot of spectators and he managed to dig deep, to find a way. “He finds a way to make it happen.” News, results and expert analysis from the weekend of sport sent every Monday.