Concerns for life in Western Australia’s Pilbara after 50.7C heat record matched

14/01/2022 10:07:00 AM

Concerns for life in Western Australia’s Pilbara after 50.7C heat record matched

Australia Weather, Western Australia

Concerns for life in Western Australia ’s Pilbara after 50.7C heat record matched

The heatwave sweeping the vast region prompts calls for authorities to consider how to make it more sustainable

Sign up to receive the top stories from Guardian Australia every morningNearby towns of Roebourne and Mardie also sweltered through the heatwave, with automatic weather stations recording temperatures of 50.5C – matching the hottest day ever recorded in

Western Australiaand breaking a new record for the second hottest day recorded nationally.Last year’s hottest place was Mardie, with a reading of 47.9C, meaning the temperature in Onslow was hotter than anywhere else in the country during 2021.Temperatures of 40C were felt from Fitzroy Crossing in the southern Kimberley and down to Norseman in the southern Goldfields.

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Australian temperatures top 50 degrees, matching hottest day ever recordedAustralia has matched its hottest ever recorded temperature today, with parts of Western Australia scorching over 50 degrees. Global warming again? Ll It's not unusual for that area, been going on for countless years

Australian temperatures top 50 degrees, matching hottest day ever recordedAustralia has matched its hottest ever recorded temperature today, with parts of Western Australia scorching over 50 degrees. Meanwhile in Sydney its felt more like a spring than summer Well it is a desert out there

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WA smashes Australian weather records with scorching dayA coastal Pilbara town in Western Australia has matched the all-time maximum temperature for Australia recorded in 1960, hitting a sweltering 50.7C. 7NEWS So 60 years ago we had these temps, probably 200 years ago as well.. climate change my arse

Second hottest day in Australia’s history recorded as the east prepares for stormsTowns in Western Australia have sweltered through the second hottest day in Australian history, while other parts of the country are bracing themselves for heavy rains, humid nights and the after-effects of an ex-tropical cyclone. Laura_R_Chung Most worrying news. Laura_R_Chung Laura_R_Chung My 2 dehumidifiers arrived the other day. Relief!

Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Sign up to receive the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Nearby towns of Roebourne and Mardie also sweltered through the heatwave, with automatic weather stations recording temperatures of 50.Western Australia scorching at over 50C on Thursday.Western Australia scorching at over 50C on Thursday.to save articles for later.

5C – matching the hottest day ever recorded in Western Australia and breaking a new record for the second hottest day recorded nationally. Last year’s hottest place was Mardie, with a reading of 47. READ MORE: Australia has matched its hottest ever recorded day today, with warmer than average sea temperatures and global warming a likely factor, (Weatherzone) In the town of Onslow temperatures hit 50.9C, meaning the temperature in Onslow was hotter than anywhere else in the country during 2021.7C, matching the hottest day on Australian record, originally established in Oodnadatta, in South Australia in 1960. Temperatures of 40C were felt from Fitzroy Crossing in the southern Kimberley and down to Norseman in the southern Goldfields. Other regions in Western Australia felt temperatures of 50. Temperatures were not expected to get as high on Friday, but Onslow recorded a temperature of 48C just after midday. He said the results were worrying and continued a long-standing trend of rising ocean temperatures, particularly given records had been broken despite last year’s La Nina event, which brings cooler conditions.

Despite experiencing 50C on Thursday, Roebourne locals were unfazed by the extreme weather. The 50. The 50. Michael Woodley, the CEO of the Yindjibarndi Aboriginal Corporation and a resident of the 630-person town, said it was “just another day in the Pilbara”. Woodley said people were pragmatic about the near-record-breaking day and looked to beat the heat however they could. READ MORE: The Pilbarra region in Western Australia is known as the country's hottest region. Those who had air conditioning spent the day inside, while those without were forced to venture out to find some shade and keep cool with a garden sprinkler – or at the local pool. (Getty) Senior Weatherzone meteorologist Brett Dutschke said temperatures in the Pilbarra, dubbed Australia's hottest region, are due to warmer than normal sea surface temperatures off WA's northern coast. Read more “People don’t really think about it. He added global warming was also a likely factor.7 and 5.

People here just know one day is hotter than the next, but I think it’s something people should be a bit more aware of now with climate change,” Woodley said. “If 50C becomes the norm, there’ll be serious problems, obviously. The town of Marble Bar bills itself as Australia's hottest town. The town of Marble Bar bills itself as Australia's hottest town.” He said that given the records, he hoped authorities would now consider what was needed to make living in the Pilbara sustainable, particularly as it was home to many First Nations people. Last year was the world’s fifth-hottest year on record, according to preliminary readings, and was likely the hottest recorded year in the Pacific.7C and it once went 160 days with max temps of 37. La Niña years are characterised by the Pacific Ocean absorbing more heat than in a neutral year.7C or higher," Mr Dutschke said. Professor Howden added the report provided a sense of urgency to reduce the impact of climate change, with technology and business already leading the way.

The Macquarie University deputy vice-chancellor and member of the Climate Council, Prof Lesley Hughes, said temperature spikes during heatwaves showed the danger of climate change because “life isn’t lived on an average”. "The region is also sunnier than normal given the monsoon and cyclone has focused the cloud, rain on Australia's northeast. “Averages are useful because we can compare averages between years or averages between decades, but what averages hide is a whole world of pain,” Hughes said. “Along with those averages are the extremes, and it’s with the extremes we actually get the impact. Mr Dutschke added sweltering days could be ahead for lower parts of the state. Mr Dutschke added sweltering days could be ahead for lower parts of the state. Averages don’t usually kill. It’s the extremes that do the harm. "The WA capital is a chance to experience a near-record heatwave, most likely from Tuesday to at least Friday.” Physical oceanographer Ian Young at the University of Melbourne said warmer ocean temperatures would create more intense weather systems, such as storms and tropical cyclones.

” Heatwaves ." READ MORE:.